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Title: Durant Weekly News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,529 items from Durant Weekly News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War Came to America from our point of view a tremendous step in advance. For although, like any effort to concisely formulate the broad principles of equity, it did not wholly succeed in its purpose, it was at least an honest attempt to arrive at an agreement on a complete international code of sea law, based upon mutual consent and not to be altered by any belligerent in the heat of the conflict. But the Declaration of London was not ratified by the British Parliament, for the point of view prevailing then in England was that a power dependent almost wholly upon its navy for protection could not safely accept further limitations upon action at sea unless there were compensating limitations on land powers. And this latter concession Germany consistently refused to make. The conference therefore came to naught. And the London Declaration having been rejected by the strongest maritime power, its indorsement was postponed by all the other countries involved. Our motives, howeve...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

....;tMJu4ftjajgateg?"s How the War Came to America the purpose of effecting dual arbitration treaties. And before the end of 1914 we had signed far-reaching treaties with 30 nations, 20 of which had been duly ratified and proclaimed. But in this work, too, we were made to feel the same opposition as at The Hague. For while Great Britain, France, Russia, and Italy cordially welcomed our overtures, the German and Austro-Hungarian Empires were noticeably absent from the list of those nations who desired by specific agreements in advance to minimize the danger of war. On the eve of the present conflict, our position toward other nations might have been summarized under three heads: I. The Monroe doctrine. We had pledged ourselves to defend the New World from European aggression, and we had by word and deed made it clear that we would not intervene in any European dispute. II. The freedom of the seas. In every naval conference our influence had been given in support of the principle tha...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War Came to America "We are the mediating Nation of the world," he declared in an address on April 20, 191 5. "We are compounded of the nations of the world; we mediate their blood, we mediate their traditions, we mediate their senti ments, their tastes, their passions; we are ourselves compounded of those things. We are, therefore, able to understand them in the compound, not separately as partisans, but unitedly :is knowing and comprehending and embodying them all. It is in that sense that I mean that America is a mediating Nation." American neutrality, in those first months of the great Avar, was beyond any question real. But the spirit of neutrality was not easy to maintain. Public opinion was deeply stirred by the German invasion of Belgium and by reports of atrocities there. The Royal Belgian Commission, which came in Septem ber, 1914, to lay their country's cause for complaint before our National Government, was received with sympathy and respect. The President in his...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War Came to America precedents which they invoked. But painful as this divergence of opinion sometimes was, it did not seriously threaten our position of neutrality, for the issues that arose involved only rights of property and were amply covered by the arbitration treaty signed only a short time before by Great Britain and the United States. And this controversy led to a clearer tinderstanding on our part of the British attitude toward our ideal of the freedom of the seas. They were not willing to accept our classification of the seas as being distinct from the Old Word. We had confined our interest to matters affecting rights at sea and had kept carefully aloof from issues affecting the interests of Kuropean nations on land. The British were interested in both. They explained that they had participated in the London naval conference in the hope that it would lead to a sound and liberal entente in the interest of the rights of all nations on the sea and on the land as well...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War Came to America relations we had with Great Britain and 19 other nations. But these over tures had been rejected. And this action on the part of the Imperial German Government was only one example of its whole system of diplo macy. In both conferences at The Hague it had been the German dele gates who were the most active in blocking all projects for the pacific set tlement of disputes between nations. They had preferred to limit inter national relations to the old modes of diplomacy and war. It was there fore obvious from the first that any controversy with the German Govern ment would be exceedingly serious; for if it could not be solved by direct diplomatic conversations, there was no recourse except to war. From such conversations there is small hope of satisfactory results unless the good faith of both sides is profound. If either side lacks good faith, or reveals in all its actions an insidious hostility, diplomacy is of no avail. And so it has proved in the presen...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War Came to America But evidence of the bad faith of the Imperial German Government soon piled up on every hand . Honest efforts on our part to establish a firm basis of good neighborliness with the German people were met by their Govern ment with quibbles, misrepresentations, and counter accusations against their enemies abroad. And meanwhile in this country official agents of the Central Powers protected from criminal prosecution by diplomatic immunity conspired against our internal peace, placed spies and agents provocateurs throughout the length and breadth of our land, and even in high positions of trust in departments of our Government. While expressing a cordial friendship for the people of the United States, the Government of Germany had its agents at work both in Latin America and Japan. They bought or subsidized papers and supported speakers there to rouse feelings of bitterness and distrust against us in those friendly nations, in order to embroil us in war. They ...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War Came to America The break would have come sooner if our Government had not been restrained by the hope that saner counsels might still prevail in Germany. For it was well known to us that the German people had to a very large extent been kept in ignorance of many of the secret crimes of their Govern ment against us. And the pressure of a faction of German public opinion less hostile to this country was shown when their Government acquiesced to sjmc degree in our demands, at the time of the Sussex outrage, and for nearly a year maintained at least a pretense of observing the pledge they had made to us. The tension was abated. While the war spirit was growing in some sections of our Nation, there was still no widespread desire to take part in the conflict abroad ; for the tradition of noninterference in Europe's political affairs was too deeply rooted in our national life to be easily overthrown. Moreover, two other considerations strengthened our Government in its efforts...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War Came to America Moreover, the German proposal was accompanied by a thinly veiled threat to all neutral nations; and from a thousand sources, official and unofficial, the word came to Washington that unless the neutrals used their influence to bring the war to an end on terms dictated from Berlin, Germany and her allies would consider themselves henceforth free from any obligations to respect the rights of neutrals. The Kaiser ordered the neutrals to exert pressure on the Entente to bring the war to an abrupt end, or to beware of the consequences. Clear warnings were brought to our Government that if the German peace move should not be successful, the submarines would be unleashed for a more intense and ruthless war ujxni all commerce. On the 1 8th of December, the President dispatched his note to all the belligerent powers, asking them to define their war aims. There was still hope in our minds that the mutual suspicions between the warring powers might be decreased, and...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

H o w the War Ca m e to A m e r 1 c a At this juncture the President read his address to the Senate, on January 22, 1917, in which he outlined the kind of peace the United States of America could join in guaranteeing. His words were addressed not only to the Senate and this Nation but to people of all countries. " May I not add that I hope and believe that I am in effect speaking for liberals and friends of humanity in every nation and of every program of liberty? I would fain believe that I am speaking for the silent mass of mankind everywhere who have as yet had not place or opportunity to speak their real hearts out concerning the death and ruin they see to have come already upon the persons and the homes they hold most dear." The address was a rebuke to those who still cherished dreams of a world dominated by one nation. For the peace he outlined was not that of a victorious emperor, it was not the peace of Caesar. It was in behalf of all the world, and it was a Peace of the Peo...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

H the War Came to America o w be made is to endure, it must be a peace made secure by the organized major force of mankind." If there were any doubt in our minds as to which of the great alliances was the more in sympathy with these ideals, it was removed by the popular response abroad to this address of the President. For while exception was taken to some parts of it in Britain and France, it was plain that so far as the peoples of the Entente were concerned the President had been amply justified is stating that he spoke for all forward-looking, liberal-minded men and women. It was not so in Germany. The people there who could be reached, and whose hearts were stirred by this enunciation of the principles of a people's peace, were too few or too oppressed to make their voices heard in the councils of their nation. Already, on January 16, 1917, unknown to the people of Germany, Herr Zimmerman, their Secretary of Foreign Affairs, had secretly dispatched a note to their minister in Me...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War Came to America them. God grant we may not be challenged by acts of willful injustice on the part of the Government of Germany. " In this address of the President, and in its indorsement by the Senate, there was a solemn warning ; for we still had hope that the German Govern ment might hesitate to drive us to war. But it was soon evident that our warning had fallen on deaf ears. The tortuous ways and means of German official diplomacy were clearly shown in the negotiations opened by theui through the Swiss legation on the iotli of February. In no word of their proposals did the German Government meet the real issue between us. And our State Department replied that no minor negotiations could be entertained until the main issue had been met by the withdrawal of the submarine order. By the ist of March it had become plain that the Imperial Government, unrestrained by the warning in the President's address to Congress on February 3, was determined to make good its threat. T...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

psr How the War Came to America judgment. But with the breaking of relations with the Government of Germany that duty at last was ended. The perfidy of that Government in its dealings with this Nation relieved us of the necessity of striving to give them the benefit of the doubt in regard to their crimes abroad. The Government which under cover of profuse professions of friendship had tried to embroil us in war with Mexico and Japan could not expect us to believe in its good faith in other matters. The men whose paid agents dynamited our factories here were capable of the infamies reported against them over the sea. Their Government's protestations, that their pur pose was self-defense and the freeing of small nations, fell like a house of cards before the revelation of their "peace terms. " And judging the German Government now in the light of our own expe rience through the long and patient years of our honest attempt to keep the peace, we could see the Great Autocracy and read he...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

How the War C a m e to A m e r 1 c a far back into the past; and its presence among the Allies had seemed to be in disaccord with the great liberal principles they were upholding in this war. Russia had been a source of doubt. Repeatedly during the conflict liberal Europe had been startled by the news of secret accord between the Kaiser and the Czar. But now at this crucial time for our Nation, on the eve of our entrance into the war, the free men of all the world were thrilled and heartened by the news that the people of Russia had risen to throw off their Government and found a new democracy; and the torch of freedom in Russia lit up the last dark phases of tiie situation abroad. Here indeed was a fit partner for the League of Honor. The conviction was finally crystallized in American minds and hearts that this war across the sea was no mere conflict between dynasties but a stupendous civil war of all the world ; a new campaign in the age-old war, the prize of which is liberty. He...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

APPENDIX I. ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. DELIVERED TO THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES. JANUARY 22. 1917. Gentlemen ok the Senate: On the eighteenth of December last I addressed an identic note to the governments of the nations now at war requesting them to state, more definitely than they had yet been stated by either group of belligerents, the terms upon which they would deem it possible to make peace. I spoke on behalf of humanity and of the rights of all neutral nations like our own, many of whose most vital interests the war puts in constant jeopardy. The Central Powers united in a reply which stated merely that they were ready to meet their antagonists in conference to discuss terms of peace. The Entente Powers have replied much more definitely and have stated, in general terms, indeed, but with sufficient definiteness to imply details, the arrangements, guarantees, and acts of reparation which they deem to be the indispensable conditions of a satisfactory set...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

Addresse s f t h President people to approve its formal and solemn adherence to a League for Peace. 1 am here, to attempt to state those conditions. The present war must first be ended; but we owe it to candour and to a jus regard for the opinion of mankind to say that, so far as our participation in guarantees of future peace is concerned, it makes a great deal of differ ence in what way and upon what terms it is ended. The treaties and agree ments which bring it to an end must embody terms which will create a peace that is worth guaranteeing and preserving, a peace that will win the approval of mankind, not merely a peace that will serve the several interests and immediate aims of the nations engaged. We shall have no voice in determining what those terms shall be, but we shall, I feel sure, have a voice in determining whether they shall be made lasting or not by the guarantees of a universal covenant; and our judgment iqxm what is fundamental and essential as a condition preceden...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

Addresses of the President interpretation upon it and that it may be understood that no other interpre tation was in my thought. I am seeking only to face realities and to face them without soft concealments. Victory would mean peace forced upon the loser, a victor's terms imposed upon the vanquished. It would oe accepted in humiliation, under duress, at an intolerable saciifice, and would leave a sting, a resentment, a bitter memory upon wliich terms of peace would rest, not permanently, but only as upon quicksand. Only a peace between equals can last. Only a peace the very principle of which is equality and a common participation in a common benefit. The right stale of mind, the right feeling between nations, is as necessary for a last ing peace as is the just settlement of vexed questions of territory or of racial and national allegiance. The equality of nations upon which peace must be founded if it is to last must be an equality of rights; the guarantees exchanged must neither ...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

Addresses f t h r e s 1 dent of direct rights of way under the general guarantee which will assure the peace itself. With a right comity of arrangement no nation need be shut away from free access to the open paths of the world's commerce. And the paths of the sea must alike in law and in fact be free. The freedom of the seas is the sine qua non of peace, equality, and cooperation. No doubt a somewhat radical reconsideration of many of the rules of inter national practice hitherto thought to be established may be necessary in order to make the seas indeed free and common in practically all circum stances for the use of mankind, but the motive for such changes is con vincing and compelling. There can be no trust or intimacy between the peoples of the world without them. The free, constant, unthreatened intercourse of nations is an essential part of the process of peace and of development. It need not be difficult cither to define or to secure the freedom of the seas if the government...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

Addresses of the President traditions or our policy as a nation, but a fulfilment, rather, of all that we have professed or striven for. I am proposing, as it were, that the nations should with one accord adopt the doctrine of President Monroe as the doctrine of the world: that no nation should seek to extend its polity over any other nation or people, but that every people should be left free to determine its own polity, its own way of development, unhindered, unthreatened, unafraid, the little along with the great and powerful. I am proposing that all nations henceforth avoid entangling alliances which would draw them into competitions of power, catch them in a net of intrigue and selfish rivalry, and disturb their own affairs with influences intruded from without. There is no entangling alliance in a concert of power. When all unite to act in the same sense and with the same pur pose all act in the common interest and are free to live their own lives under a common protection. I ...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

APPENDIX II. ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. DELIVERED AT A JOINT SESSION OF THE TWO HOUSES OF CONGRESS. APRIL 2, 1917. Gentlemen op the Congress: I have called the Congress into extraordinary session because there arc serious, very serious, choices of policy to be made, and made immediately, which it was neither right nor constitutionally permissible that I should assume the responsibility of making. On the third of February last I officially laid before you the extraor dinary announcement of the Imperial German Government that on and after the first day of February it was its purpose to put aside all restraints oi law or of humanity and use its submarines to sink every vessel that sought to approach either the ports of Great Britain and Ireland on the western coasts of Europe or any of the ports controlled by the enemies of Germany within the Mediterranean. That had seemed to be the object of the German submarine warfare earlier in the war, but since April of last y...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — Durant weekly news. — 2 November 1917

Addresses f the President were supposed to underlie the intercourse of the world. I am not now thinking of the loss of property involved, immense and serious as that is, but only of the wanton and wholesale destruction of the lives of noncom batants, men, women, and children, engaged in pursuits which have always, even in the darkest periods of modern history, been deemed innocent and legitimate. Property can be paid for; the lives of peaceful and innocent people can not be. The present German submarine warfare against com merce is a warfare against mankind. It is a war against all nations. American ships have been sunk, American lives taken, in ways which it has stirred us very deeply to learn of, but the ships and people of other neutral and friendly nations have been sunk and overwhelmed in the waters in the same way. There has been no dis crimination. The challenge is to all mankind. Each nation must decide for itself how it will meet it. The choice we make for ourselves must be...

Publication Title: Durant Weekly News
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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