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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 jfa J& The perfect truck for all you farm animals is Magnum V-6 or V-8 engine. Even our Ram Vans m 'Hh a Dodge. And if you 're a member of a partic- and Ram Wagons are part of the deal with $500 Jk ipating state Farm Bureau, this is the perfect back. All this cash is on top of any other time to buy one. national Dodge consumer incentive offer, too** Jpjk |jk As a member, All you need to do is get a certificate from C JBk\ Regular and Club Cab fßiill BP you've been a member for Pickups* And $500 back on iIM -- at east 30 days. Then stop by Ram 2500 and 3500 Pickups and JJr your Dodge dealer. Where you'll I Chassis Cabs, and including our new find a line of trucks that work our full line of Magnum® engines including the jepE V-6, V-8, V-IO and the Cummins Turbo Diesel. W We're nhn oiuino rnvli hnrl nn vvlert It may not be used in combination with any other Chrysler certificate program Wf vve re UISO giving tasn VULK on select w certain other spccla] programs Ask...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News AITC reaches 9,000 fourth graders (Continued from page 1) "We wanted a new format that would relate a variety of different subjects to agriculture and would fit with the new Standards Of Learning," said Michele Awad, executive director of the Virginia Foundation for AITC. "The new material will be in a lesson plan format that makes it more teacher friendly. "It's kind of like a recipe for teaching agriculture," Ms. Awad explained. Ag in the Classroom was started in the 1980s by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to help elementary school students become agriculturally literate. The benefit of the new curriculum is that if agriculture is incorporated into another school subject, then students will be more apt to learn about the industry, Ms. Awad said. AITC historically has been taught as part of a fourth-grade social studies unit. It covered such topics as how crops are grown; how farmers prevent soil and water erosion; how agricultural producers protect the environ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 Young farmers hear advice on environment (Continued from page 1) Bruce Vincent, president of Alliance for America, spoke Jan. 31 at the annual Young Farmers' Leadership Conference, which was sponsored by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Vincent, who owns part of a family logging business in Libby, Mont., said his organization is a network of 12 million rural Americans, including farmers, ranchers, loggers and miners. The Sierra Club calls the Alliance "the single biggest threat to 30 years of progressive environmental legislation," Vincent said. "We have a staff of none, all volunteers, and a $40,000-a-year budget. That horrifies them. "I think it's the truth and our vision that horrifies them," said Vincent, who has a master's degree in civil engineering. "We think it's time for a new, more mature, more realistic environmental movement to emerge from the wreckage of the old environmental movement and take it over." After his presentation, a group of young farmers gat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News A Farill Credit A Customer Owned Business ;"H7r 9^l- - 1 H ~jk «£■ 11 in mii^ii li 4mhhMW™ol We'll be there when you need us... generation after generation. At Farm Credit, a cooperative owned by the people who use us, we have served the needs of rural Americans for generations. In fact, for over 75 years we have been a dependable source of credit to agriculture. We make loans at competitive interest rates for all kinds of purposes. We also provide many other financial services. Our loan officers are knowledgeable and can help tailor a financial package to fit your situation. So, whether you are a commercial operator, a part-time farmer or simply like living in the country, we want to do business with you. And we'll be there for future generations. Colonial Farm Credit Mechanicsville, VA 1-800-777-8908 Southwest Virginia Farm Credit Wytheville, VA (540) 228-8668 Roanoke Farm Credit Roanoke, VA (540) 977-5707 Staunton Farm Credit Staunton, VA (540) 886-3435 Valley Fa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 Farmers are cooperating in 3 studies RICHMOND —Farmers on Virginia's Eastern Shore will be working with scientists over the next couple of years to attempt to answer a perplexing question—just what is killing thousands of baby clams in local fish-farming operations? Farmers will be cooperating with researchers in three separate studies authorized by the Virginia Pesticide Control Board, at a cost of $550,000. They hope to learn valuable information for their own operations, according to Dr. Marvin Lawson, program manager for the Office of Pesticide Management with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. "There will be some studies done to look at Best Management Practices and see which ones are most efficacious for the grower to put into place, and which ones are less expensive," Lawson explained. Two years ago clam growers were petitioning state officials to shut down local tomato farms, believing that the practice of using plastic mulch was leading...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News Agriculture leaders ask state lawmakers to be fair to farmers By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —They jammed elevators, crowded the hallways of the Virginia General Assembly building and occupied every available chair in the offices of some lawmakers. It was democracy at work. Farm Bureau leaders —84 from 42 counties—went to Richmond and encouraged legislators on Jan. 26 to pass legislation that would be fair to farmers. They told lawmakers which bills would hurt agriculture and which would help it. Farm Bureau leaders often had to wait in line behind representatives of other organizations before they could visit with a particular lawmaker. Ag leaders expressed concern over two proposed bills that could hurt farming. One proposed bill was submitted by Paul Councill, DFranklin, and it would weaken the Right to Farm Act of 1994 by reinstating local authority to require conditional use permits for confined livestock operations in agriculture zones. Under ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 Asian crisis diminishes agriculture exports (Continued from page 1) into Hong Kong only one-third full, he noted. Virginia's pork and beef exports have been less affected, Rich said. "Beef is not a major factor in the Hong Kong diet. Pork is a major factor, but a fair amount of pork comes from mainland China." "The Asian financial crisis virtually stopped chicken export movement the last part of 1997," May said, adding that 27.5 percent of all of Rocco's exports go to Asia. "We've seen a 40 to 45 percent decrease in pricing during the last quarter of 1997 and 1998 year to date." Fortunately, the slump in exports hasn't resulted in the loss of jobs or a cutback in hours at Rocco, May said. In February, several poultry producers attended a meeting in Richmond and said the Asian situation has not affected them yet. For the fiscal year 1997, sales at Wampler Foods Inc. reached $1,014 billion for domestic and overseas markets. Exports account for 10 percent of Wampler's sales,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News Farmers to get tax break for practicing conservation RICHMOND —Virginia farmers who use conservation practices will soon be eligible for tax relief. Signed into law in 1996, farmers will see an Agricultural BMP Tax Credit on their financial statements in 1999. Since that tax break is based on a conservation plan filed with local soil and water conservation districts, farmers need to start planning for it now. "The BMP tax credit is something we pushed for and got two years ago," said Wilmer Stoneman, senior assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "We certainly think this is an important step toward providing incentives for farmers statewide, not just in a certain watershed or region." The agricultural tax credit gives farmers a break for voluntarily using Best Management Bill to help equine industry RICHMOND —Leaders from throughout Virginia's horse country recently met with state legislators on an issue they believe could great...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 Revolutionary "2-iri-1" TRIMMER/ MOWER! Hevoiuuonary "z-in-v TRIMMER/ <( "1 MOWER! i J held trimmer and rotary mower! • The DR® TRIMMER/MOWER™ rolls J * Perfect light as a feather on two BIG WHEELS! f° r ALL • TRIMS far easier, better, W*s trimmtoe bend or dull. c iruvi/Accrriihe Takes the place of both your handheld trimmer and rotary mower! • The DR® TRIMMER/MOWER™ rolls light as a feather on two BIG WHEELS! "Pound for pound the best piece of equipment we ever bought!" • *FssHBfceJfcisrLX^ // //// tjic k that I c an © 1998 CHP, Inc. "*' i So, WHY HASSLE with hand-held trimmers that are hard to start and tiring to use...Oß with smallwheels mowers? Please call or write for FREE DETAILS about the Revolutionary DR® TRIMMER/MOWER"! |~YESf Please rush complete FREE DETAILS of the"! !Revolutionary DR® TRIMMER/MOWER" including prices! j and specifications of Manual, Electric-Starting and Professional' | Models and "Off-Season" Savings now in effect, i i i i |Name FB ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Harvest disappoints corn, soybean growers RICHMOND— Dry weather during the summer is blamed for Virginia's lowest corn yields since 1993, state agriculture officials said. Soybean yields were also well below average, but tobacco, peanuts and cotton fared better, said jim Lawson, deputy statistician for the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. Corn yields averaged only 93 bushels per acre, down sharply from the 1996 record high yield of 126 bushels, according to a survey conducted by VASS. This was the lowest since 1993 when a summer-long drought held yields to only 60 bushels. Dry weather during critical stages of development damaged corn on much of the 325,000 acres where it was planted. Some of the poorest fields were abandoned or cut for silage, Lawson noted. Soybean yields were only 23 bushels per acre in 1997. In 1996, they were 34 bushels. Flue-cured tobacco yields averaged 2,200 pounds per acre, down from the previous year's 2,235 pound ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 Oprah hurt beef prices, expert says AMARILLO, Texas—There was a direct cause-and-effect relationship between last year's Oprah Winfrey show about "mad cow disease" and a large drop in wholesale beef prices, according to Dr. Wayne Purcell, director of Virginia Tech's Department of Agricultural Economics. "A significant and rather dramatic shock from outside the normal influences of the market affected the prices of fed cattle during the week of April 20th, 1996," Purcell told the court during a product disparagement lawsuit by Texas cattlemen against Ms. Winfrey. '"The Oprah Winfrey Show' was what brought the prices down to their extraordinary level," Purcell said. Purcell, a nationally known farm economist, said normal market forces like drought, supply and feed costs were not responsible for the nearly $7 drop in cattle prices following the Oprah show on mad cow disease. The author of a book criticizing the beef industry was interviewed during the program in question, an...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News Myrtle Beach conference proves worthwhile Family farming is what we do. So learning some ways to more successfully work, socialize and handle financial obligations together hit home for us. During the American Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmer and Rancher Conference in Myrtle Beach, S.C., Feb. 14-16, we attended a workshop called "Farming With Family and Staying Friends." We came away with some useful information. In addition to learning how to Overturned tractor kills driver on hill In January, a 50-year-old man was killed when his farm tractor overturned. The tractor was equipped with a front-end loader and was being operated on a hillside. Unfortunately, the tractor was not equipped with a roll-over protection device. Please contact the Virginia Farm Bureau safety coordinator at 804-784-1476 if you are aware of any farm accidents in Virginia. This unofficial report will appear each month. Virginia Fatality Statistics* tractor overturns 1 tractor run-overs 0 tra...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 Stray dogs are hurting livestock production By CHRISTY McKAY Special to the Farm Bureau News Farmers who once enjoyed quiet evenings in Central Virginia's countryside are hearing sounds of bobcats and coyotes. Al and Susan Epperly of Bedford County have been frightened by the screams and howls of wild animals, but pet dogs are the ones raiding livestock barns. "The bobcat screams raise the hair on the back of my neck and it makes my heart beat faster," said Mrs. Epperly. "But in Bedford County, the biggest predators are domestic dogs." Bedford farmer j.D. Scott didn't see what spooked his cattle last fall and made them run through a fence, but he's almost sure it was dogs. "I worry about dogs a lot," he said. "It's hard to sleep." In Virginia, farmers can legally kill a dog if it is chewing on livestock. Last December, the Epperlys killed one of two dogs they saw chewing on sheep. The neighbor, who lived almost four miles away and had said previously that his dog never le...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month Is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail It to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the 10TH of each month preceding the publication month. I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue In which they will appear. I Ads MUST Include member number to be published. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTI...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 (Continued from page 18) condition, loaded. $29,500. negotiable, Middlesex. 804-776-6654. 1979 FORD TRUCK — 3/4 ton. 4 wheel drive, lockin, lockout hubs, selling for $ 1,800. 804-966-1257. 1972 FORD RANCHERO - with GT hood and camper shell, restorable, $500. leave message. 804-739-2620. [ ftf/sr/11 -\Nt BARRELS — plastic, used, 55 gallons, $7.50, each, 10 for $50. 804-932-3693. New Kent. 804-932-3693. CLOCKS WANTED — old grandfather, shelf, or wall clocks wanted, any condition, cash paid. 804-265-8141. DYNAII — Riteway furnace, wood, coal, oil, all accessories, 2 pumps, 2 oil tanks, excellent condition, make offer. 804-946-5393. WANTED — antiques, glassware, pottery art, glass, furniture, dishes, jewelry, silver, silver, primitives, anything, old, collectible. 804-560-0753. WANTED TO BUY — old genuine wicker furniture in good condition, call 804-385-8189, anytime. HEAVY DUTY ~ 2 or 4 horse wagon, good condition, seats 15 to 20 people, great for parades, weddings, etc, cal...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News / V / lor more information call: I -SOO-229-7779 or contact your local I arm Bureau of] ice and ash /or our free brochure'. BHBSsbbSI® —" x!5 Jjp< @t t ' v 4 ,• Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? I. E 3 z ►c «r> v E 3 1 You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! WM ■* ip|'" ■ " » >■* \ • , V -t|Wmßmi The Voice of Virginia's Agricultural Producers Health Care Coverage • If you are under age 65 — for Individuals or families • If you are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, personalized se...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1998

Farm Bureau Volume 5 7, Number 3 Ag interests protected in General Assembly By JOHNNA MILLER VFBF Radio/Video Producer RICHMOND—Farm Bureau members claimed victory on some key agricultural issues in the Virginia General Assembly by making phone calls and office visits to lawmakers and by packing legislative meeting rooms. Many farmers, especially poultry producers, breathed a sigh of relief after the session ended on March I 7. A proposal to further regulate the poultry industry was a threat for several weeks but was defeated. This is the issue that led to Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's biggest lobbying victory of the session. However, it will likely pose the organization's biggest challenge for the year to come. "This was such a successful Watch out for slow moving vehicles By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist DINWIDDIE—Lance Everett began to believe in the power of Slow Moving Vehicle signs after a close call between his tractor and a car coming around a curve on one o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1998

Farm Bureau News Striving toward goals can reduce stress, conference speaker says By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist WILLIAMSBURG —Farm Bureau women were told that they can bring harmony to their lives by appreciating who they are and what they do. "Once you appreciate you, it's so much easier to reach out and appreciate others," said Cher Holton, the workshop speaker at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Conference March 1-3. Mrs. Holton, a certified speaking professional and certified management consultant, offered tips on reducing stress and replacing it with harmony. "It's incredible to me all the things you have to pull together," said Mrs. Holton, who holds a doctorate in human resources development. "We can't get rid of the problems, but we have a major amount of control over what happens in our lives." And, sometimes, Farm Bureau women have control over what happens in other people's lives as well. As most of the record crowd of 240 women listened to Ms. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1998

April 1998 Poultry industry already cleaning up Bay Poultry growers have received a lot of negative attention recently because of alleged pollution of the state's rivers and Chesapeake Bay. Additional negative attention came as environmentalists tried unsuccessfully to place mandatory regulations on producers during the General Assembly. Let me assure you, Virginia's 1,400 poultry growers are doing their part to clean up the Chesapeake Bay — voluntarily! And statistics prove it. While news reports of alleged poultry pollution have appeared numerous times in recent months, little has been reported about the environmental safeguards already in place and the reduction in nonpoint source nutrients flowing into the Bay. Poultry growers have lowered runoff of phosphorous and nitrogen by setting aside buffer grass strips near waterways, building livestock waste storage facilities, utilizing precision application equipment and developing scientific nutrient management plans. They utilize co...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1998

Farm Bureau News Pesticide worries loom for Virginia growers By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—FederaI officials are looking at outlawing pesticides that pose little risk to human health, and that's got farmers worried. A new law requires the Environmental Protection Agency to calculate all human exposures to a pesticide, including home use, farm use and commercial use. If all those exposures total too high, the chemical could be banned even if its farm use does not pose a health threat. And a lot of common farm chemicals are also used by the public, such as the popular herbicide Roundup. "It's hard to tell exactly what EPA is going to do right now, but they don't have long to do it in," commented Spencer Neale, assistant commodities director for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "They've got about 18 months to look at a third of the chemical tolerances out there." Neale attended an American Farm Bureau Federation conference recently on how the 1996 Food Quality Protect...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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