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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Notes on Half Moon Bay.—No. 1. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Notes on Half Moon Bay.—No. 1. Editors Press:—The Half Moon Bay region is well known for its richness and great fertility; for its heavy yield of cereal and root crops, be the season wet or dry; for its disagreeable, wet fog banks that come rolling in from the ocean, drenching everything and obscuring the sunshine for days and days; and last, but not the least, for its prosperous and well-to-do farmers. Having no drouths to gobble up the earnings of the ordinary season, there is nothing to prevent a steady accumulation of means and the comforts of life, where due diligence and industry are exercised. This whole country lies boldly fronting the ocean—part valley, but principally hill lands. From the southwest line of the old Francisco Sanchez ranch, south to the San Gregoria, about twenty miles, and from the ocean to the summit of the coast range, averaging eight miles, is known as Half Moon Bay. South from the San Gregoria to New Year's Point, some twenty miles, is the Pescadero reg...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
"Stick." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

"Stick." [Written for the Phesb.] There is a world of force and meaning in the little word which heads this article, though it sounds even more briefly, it is not less emphatic than the sententious exclamation of the gallant Lawrence "Don't give up the ship," or the equally well known injunction—"Pick your flint and try again," or "Trust in God, but keep your powder dry." When some good enterprise meets with checks and impediments, and opposition lifts itself up, and the tides of progress stop in their flow or roll backward and leave it, like some vast ship stranded and struggling with the waves, which it can no longer ride, let those who believe in our motto bate nothing of either heart or hope; but "stick," wait, work, and ere long the tide will turn again to its flow, and you will once more sail on with favoring wind and wave. When some] young inventor who has struggled long with difficulties, and is seemingly on the verge of success, meets with unexpected impediment, and finds s...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Interesting to Settlers. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Interesting to Settlers. The Commissioner of the General Land Office has issued a circular explaining the effect of recent legislation by Congress upon the interests of settlers on the public lands. With respect to " offered lands," filing within thirty days and payment within twelve months after settlement are still required: "The settler on surveyed ' unoffered land' must file his or her declaratory statement within three months from the date of his or her settlement on such land, and within thirty months from the expiration of said three months, make the proper proof, and pay for such land. "Where settlers have already filed before the passage of the Act, [of July 14, 1870,] they are required to make proof and payment within two years from such passage; therefore, all filings made prior to that date will expire, by limitation of law, upon unoffered lands, on the 14th of July, 1872. 11 The settler on ' unsurveyed land' must file his or her declaratory statement within three months...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SHEEP AND WOOL. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

SHEEP AND WOOL.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Interesting to Wool-Growers. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Interesting to Wool-Growers. The Marysville Appeal says that Mr. R. F. Parks recently exhibited some samples of wool of extraordinary quality—having a fine ailky appearance, with good length and strength of staple. The wool was taken from a herd in this State. This wool appears to be more or less accidental in its production, and the Appeal is informed that sheep producing a similar quality have occasionally been found in other flocks, and it is believed that rams of this breed have been imported into the State direct from Europe, or by way of Australia, and were lost sight of during the time that medium wool was in such active demand for army clothing. This subject must greatly interest sheep raisers, and that they may know the origin of the valuable sheep from which this description of wool is taken, the Appeal gives the following quotation from an address delivered at the Fair of the American Institute, New York City, October 30th, 1870, by John L. Hayes:— "In 1828 there was acci...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Angora and Common Goats. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Angora and Common Goats. The Stars and Stripes, of Auburn, makes an interesting reference to a tine herd of thoroughbred and graded Angora goats, belonging to Dr. S. P. Thomas and Capt. E. D. Shirland, from which we quote the following account of their practieical experience in grading up the common red and black-haired goat of this State, by intermixture with the pure Angoras:— This herd now numbers somewhat over fifteen hundred, including several hundred spring kids and every grade from the common black Mexican to the snow-white, fullblood Angora. Capt. Shirland has made hi in hi-If conversant, by exhaustive reading and close observation, with every phase and detail of the business to which he has devoted his attention, and has unerringly and incontrovertibly demonstrated that, under intelligent management, the short, coarse hair of our cheap common goat can, at small cost, scarcely any risk of failure and with nearly absolute and invariable results, be bred into the long, fine, v...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Disease of the Biflex Canal in Sheep. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Disease of the Biflex Canal in Sheep. We are told that there are owners of sheep who still believe, with writers ipon husbandry,three centuries ago, that "There be some sheep that hath a worrae in his foote that maketh hyin halt," —some who are ignorant of the physical characteristics of the Biflex canal, or "issue" as it is some Fig. I. times called, which is found in the front and upper part of the cleft between the toes of sheep. Some foreign substance occasionally finds its way into this opening, which causes an irritation and swelling of the surrounding parts, and there are some herders, we have been told, who, when this occurs, think there is a "wormo" in the way, and actually attack the little opening shown in figure 1, with a pocket knife, to cut out —or rather, mangle out —the skin which surrounds the opening. We are Fir;. 11. confident, however, that such ignorance is exceedingly rare; yet it is possible there may be many who have never made themselves so thoroughly acquai...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
FARM NOVELTIES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

FARM NOVELTIES. A Fueak OB Sport of Nati'iu:.—A correspondent writes to Moore's Mural New Yorker, as follows: We have in our orchard something of a curiosity; at least we consider it so. A limb of a natural fruit tree forks, one branch bearing fruit Binrilar to the rest of the treo in every respect, except that the skin is like the Golden Russet in appearance. The fruit of (he other branch is tho nnnie as that on the rest of the tree, a small white sweet apple, very suitable for eating. It has now borne fruit as described eight years. A part of the tree is grafted to Pippins and a part to Baldwins. What is the cause of tho freak ? The Rural replica to the above as follows: We understand from this account that the only difference between the fruit on tho limb described, is in the rtlMety skin. Variations of this kind sometimes happen, without assignable causes. We once saw what appeared to bo nectarines growing on a small branch of an old peach tree, where no bud had been inserted— t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. Harvesting Begun. Mr. D. L. Perkins writes us from Sherman Island that harvesting commenced there on tho sth inst., the barley being fully ripe. Tho headers are having as much as thoy can do. The grain is large and plump. Tho Argus of Juno 3d, published at Snelling, Merced county, says that tho farmers in that vicinity also are busily engaged in heading and threshing, mid the reports heard thus far are, that crops are turning out better than expected a few weeks ago. Tho cool weather which prevailed throughout tho month of May was extremely favorable to tho wheat crop, and many fields nro being harvested that were given up as totally lost. The Amador Ledger says that everywhere along tho foot-hills in that county the ranchmen are busy harvesting, and with but very few exceptions the yield is abundant. Barley in the vicinity of Gilroy will be ready for harvesting the first of next week. In fact, everywhere, throughout the central portion of the Stato, ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Cheap Strawberry Chests. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Cheap Strawberry Chests. Editors Pkess: —It appears to me that the strawberry growers have too long adopted a suicidal policy in packing and paying for the freight of nearly 30 tons per day of dead weight, tare, or useless lumber, to say nothing of the return carriage—another 30 tons—when equal capacity could be obtained in lighter chests, that need not, with all tho slides included, exceed probably 8 tons, or 20 pounds each, instead of 80, as at present. If they were to be filled with gold dust they would not need to bo stronger than they are now constructed. It is something too absurd and preposterous to have to pay daily for conveyance and reconveyance, the double journey, equivalent to 1(50 pounds of nonremunerative lumber, 10 enable us to bring to market not over 96 pounds of berries, worth of late not much over $3. Reform of the most radical kind is certainly needed, or the public need never again expect to enjoy such an abundant harvest of Nature's sweetest gifts as we have f...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Small Fruits—Free Packages—Larger Sales and Better Profits. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Small Fruits—Free Packages—Larger Sales and Better Profits. Ens. RrnAT.Press:— The season of small fruits is now upon us, with unprecedented abundance, and as they are selling at prices ruinous to the producers, I cannot but feel that we, the producers, as a mass, are to a certain extent, blamable for the present state of affairs. Now let us look squarely at the whole thing, the present mode of management, etc. We may say that all the berries that finds their way into our markets, are sent in chests which contain 96 pounds of berries, while the lumber in the chest weighs 80 pounds. Now we ship by weight, and nay, from San Jo.so to San Francisco by express, 80 cents per chest, and as tho Chest is always considered returnable, for every time we ship a chest of berries to market; we have to pay freight on eighty pounds of lumber twice over the road; or, otherwise, we pay about thirty-one cents freight on berries, and forty-nine cents freight on lumber; and still the majority think the ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Native Sense vs. Book Learning. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Native Sense vs. Book Learning. There is doubtless something ridiculous to the minds of men in the idea frequently put forth by a certain class of agricultural writers, in'behulf of the position that the cultivation and other processes ofdrawing sustenance from the soil ought to be regarded as one of the high arts of human effort. But the laugh is not always on the side of those who may thing the fool of the family is best fitted for the farmer. Chancing to be in a book store not long ago, using Dowuing's work to indentify a certain variety of apple, there! was present a plain farmer, who had never seen the inside of a high school, v professor who has charge of one of the leadingsehools on this coast, and the bookseller, who was educated in one of the best schools of Massachusetts. A conversation, commencing on the subject of varieties, and how they occur in the processes of nature, and how they can be made by artificial means, it was not long until tho farmer had it all his own way...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Utilizing Gopher and Squirrel Skins. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Utilizing Gopher and Squirrel Skins. A largo part of this Stato is greatly annoyed by myriads of gophers and squirrels, which breed by millions, and do an immense amount of injury to our grain and pasture fields, and root crops. Various devioea have been tried to got rid'of them or keep them within reasonable numbers; but apparently, with very little success. If any one or two farmers devote time and money to destroying them by poison, or in any other manner, they only do so to see their fields immediately overrun, by emigrants from their neighbors' enclosures. Borne counties have paid out largo sums in the way of bounties for their scalps; but still the nuisance is not sensibly abated. If they only ran up trees and lived on nuts, we might eat them, and the value of their flesh for food added to a small bounty, might tempt a more general and persistent effort at their destruction; but we .are too fastidious in our appetites—it makes a wonderful difference (in our imagination), wheth...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Siege of Paris. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

The Siege of Paris. [Condensed from London Engineering.] During the seven months of the siege of Paris, the industrial arts and sciences lent their earnest co-operation to tho long sustained work of the defence; and a vast number of problems were presented, for whioh solutions more or loss successful had to be discovered. What had to be Done at the Siege. It was necessary to east heavy ordnance, to mako mitraillouses, to build gun carriages and ammunition wagons, to obtain vast supplies of projectiles, to convert old-fashioned muskets and rifles into efficient pieces, to turn out powder and cartridges, and to prepare formidable explosives. Turning to other equal or even greater necessities, there had to be erected hundreds of mills to convert into flour the immense stock of cereals stored up in the city, and to build or adapt establishments for tlit 1* salting, or preserving in other fashions, tho flesh of thousands of oxen and horses, to boil down their fat, or produce concentrated...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
When to Visit California. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

When to Visit California. Tho following advice of When to Visit California, is from a California Correspondent of the New York World, and our Eastern friends, who are contemplating a trip thitherward for pleasure, will find it perfectly correct: Moat of our visitors have hertof ore come in the summer and fall seasons, which are the most uncomfortable seasons for travel, both on the railroad and in California. The heat in the cars is almost intolerable then, and cannot be mitigated by opening the windows without admitting another annoyance in the shape of dust, which in the dry season becomes thick and penetrating. The most pleasant seasons for travel are the winter and spring. There is no dust then, and tho cars are always comfortable, even in the coldest weather. Spring is the season of greatest beauty in nearly all lands, but it is particularly so in California. Verdure and floral beauty meet the eye everywhere then; the air is balmy with gentle zephyrs and laden with the odor of ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Are the Redwood Forests being Thinned Out? [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Are the Redwood Forests being Thinned Out? Mr. Hihn, a twenty years resident of Santa Cruz county, through a correspondent of the Bulletin, of this city, denies that the redwood forests are being thinned out, as so often reported, and generally believed. He says that, in the vicinity of Santa Cruz the trees perpetuate themselves rapidly; unlike the pine, the redwood grows again from the stump. There are plenty of trees there only fourteen years old which have a diameter of fourteen inches and a circumference of forty-two inches. Fifteen years ago the people of Santa Cruz county, he says, thought the tan bark or chestnut oak would soon give out, although its consumption in county tanneries was then but about 200 cords per year; now the local consumption and ex port is about 4,000 cords per year, yet the trees are as plenty as ever, the tan bark oaks like the redwood growing from the stump. Mr. Hihn thinks it would take sixty years at the present rate of consumption to cut down all th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Prevention Better than Cure. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Prevention Better than Cure. [Written /or the Press.] Health is a necessary condition to happiness, and attention should be given to preserving rather than regaining it—our chief aim should be how to prevent rather than how to cure disease. Let us take consumption. In the highest schools of medicine known, those of Paris, the principal advance lately made is the use of hypophosphite lime and soda to countei-act or prevent the formation of tuberculous matter in the lungs. Now it can be proven that by excluding improper food, such as pork, milk, alcoholic preparations and all extraneous excitants; and using very little liquid at the time of eating, thus exciting the salivary glands to their highest state of efficiency; in fact, bringing out the national hypophosphite secreted by that important organ—the first step is taken to prevent consumption. The age of man should average a hundred years, and he should be able to continue in active usefulness up to that period of life. The human r...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Fruit Instead of Medicine. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Fruit Instead of Medicine. There is no doubt but that the free use of good fruit is highly conducive to health, and indeed almost indispensable to it. Much of the sickness in the western country is occasioned by the want of it. It is the great scarcity of it that creates such a demand for physic in our western country. The various fevers and billious disorders prevalent in the summer seasons are more owing to the want of it than to any other cause. And not until fruit is generally cultivated, and used as an article of diet, shall we be rid of those disorders which are sapping the life fountains of thousands of our farmers annually. And if fruit were administered in many cases as an article of medicine, instead of the physician's prescription, we have no doubt it would be far better for the patient. Nature in this, as in all other respects, has bountifully supplied us with varieties which, if properly cared for, will enable us to enjoy a succession throughout the year. But fruit is n...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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