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Title: Dunmunkle Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,667 items from Dunmunkle Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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JIBBING HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

JIBBING HORSES. To say a jibbing horse may be cured of the habit in its own stall, sounds a Otrifle impracticable to the average horse " man. Nevertheless (writes a contributor to the Sydney "Stockand Station Jour nil") the only real cure for jibbing is the " stall" treatment, which I have never known to fail in effecting a per manent cure inside a week. The horse is kept under treatment in the daytime only, and at night he is permitted the freedom from work that any well man nered horse enjoys. First of all the horse is put in the stall with the harness on. The traces are necessarily short, for they are attached to the rings of the breechings, at the back of which is attached a strong ring. Fairly high up ; a bar is placed across the stall. To the centre of this bar is fastened a pully block, a strong rope is fastened to the ring at the back of the breeching and f passed through the pulley, and then fastened to a weight of some kind. The idea is to induce the horse to pull the weig...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MURTOA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

MURTOA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. A meeting was held on Monday evening, there being present :—Messrs. K. Tobin (president), C. Schodde, C. Gulbin, F. O. Wagner, H. J. Hateley, R. Anders, H. Pepper, E. Bullen, W. Lloyd, W. Lannin, J. Degenhardt, G. C. Hateley, A ]. Hateley, C. Slaughter, C. Sprake, Dr. Rahl and E. S. Lee (secretary). A letter was read from the Goroke Agricultural Society, objecting to the increased oversea freights of 25 per cent, as charged by the shipping com panies, and asking that the Chamber of Commerce be approached on the sub ject.—No action taken. Miss Lavers was appointed as steward in the Miscellaneous section. next snow. The president was glad to see such a good attendance, to consider the pro priety of holding a show this very un usual season. Personally he thought it would be courting disaster to hold a show this year. Taking his own people they usually had 30 or 40 entries, but all iheir stock had this year to be sent away for grass. He could not see that a ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Women in Turkey. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

Women in Turkey. T Turkish girls of the better class in the cities, after they are too old to attend the primary schools, are lllrgvly c*diicaf«d homo ^ (JUVd nesses, many of -whom come from England and France, but, unfortu nately, do not always represent the highest culture of theso na tions, so that tho real love of stidy is not, as a rule, developed under their influence. Turkish women have a great ap titude for foreign languages, and those met on the steamers of- the Bosphorus often speak French, and it is not unusual for them to speak German and English also. It is a well-known fact that many , Turkish women are engaged in trade, some even carrying on an extensive business, involving fre quent journeys to Egypt and other places, which pre-supposes the abil ity • to read and write, as well as some knowledge of arithmetic. Moreover, conversation with the Mussulman women in the capital .'reveals some progress at the prO wont-. tirrio in in (IcperuleriCC of i thought; and, while so...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Novels of the Road. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

Novels of the Road. + It was ' Fielding and Smollett who began the jolly tradition in English fiction of setting their heroes out on the road to pick up such curious adventures and com panions as they could fnd there ; and it is at least a curious coin cidence that they both wrote on Don Quixote, the greatest of all travellers, alter Odysseus. Smollett wrote a translation of "Don Quix ote," and one of Fielding's earliest works was . a play called " Don Quixote in England." So that it is not hard to guess where that tradition started. Dickens follow ed them in their tradition. He i3 the greatest novelist of the English road. There are more fine things of the road in him than in all of the rest put together. Thackeray did not follow the tradition. He used the road very little, and Miss Austen used it not at all. But. in spite of these ex ceptions, that tradition of the value of the road in fiction was ' well established. Mfiretiith nnd Mr. j Hardy have both used tHe road. | Evan Harri...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WENT ONE BETTER. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

WENT ONE BETTER. Riggs : "I've been most unfortu nate to-day." h Biggs : "How so ?" Riggs : "Well, I aa.\ri a piece of bread-and-jam in. the road, and poked it with my -walking-stick. A minute later I was arrested for disturbing the peace." Biggs : "Really ! AVhat hard lack! A friend of mine had a very simi lar experience quite recently. He saw a bad penny lying in the.roa(l, and walked past it. Immediately afterwards he -was arrested for pass ing bad money."

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cloth and Nettles. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

Cloth and Nettles. ■+ An English syndicate has recent ly paid over £15,000 for the right to make yarn and cloth out of nettle fibre, a German company owning the patent.. It expects to build up a biff business from the use of what for generations has been regarded as a useless, annoy ing weod. But to-day the lowly nettle is put to a score of uses abroad. It is high in value as food for swine and poultry ; in Sweden nettles are cultivated for cattle fodder., Poultry 4 1-- aDd so do horses. In F.nglnnd nettle beer, made from the stalks and leaves, is in great demand in some localities. Yarn and cloth, both fine and coarse, arc made of the fibre, and oven carpets. Both fine lace and strong ropes are made from the Siberian nettle. One species of nettle produces nu tritious tubers, which are eaten boiled or raw in India. Another species supplies china cloth, or ra mie. The roots of nettles, boiled in alum, yield a fine yello-v dye.(The juice of the stalk and leaves is used to dye woollen ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Selecting a Maid of Honour. HOW THE POST IS FILLED. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

Selecting a Maid of Honour. HOW THE POST IS FILLED. Dating- back to the end of the sixteenth century, when J ames I. appointed four "'damsels of clear birth and good breeding " to tend on his Consort, under the direc tln of a "dowager of discretion"— a personage often called "tho Mother cY the Maids," a post long since abolished—the position of Maid of Honour is a much-coveted one. In deed, tho Hon. Sybil Cadogan, ap pointed a Maid of Honour by Queen Mary, was one of over 100 j;irls who were hopefully waiting to be chosen to fill the vacancy. The privileges and advantages at tached to the position are many, but a Maid of Honour must of ne cessity be an exceedingly accom plished young woman. In the first place she must be a grand-daughter of a peer, if not nearer in blood ; for, unless some special provision j is made, tVio office cannot be held by anyone below that rank. Secondly* she must be a good linguist, not only because of the foreigners she ■Rill meet at Court, but because sh...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIMIT OF COURTESY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

LIMIT OF COURTESY* Japan's new Prime Minister, Count Okujna, has a wooden leg. It replaces a limb which was blown of! by the bomb of a political as sassin. In connection with that outrage, a story is told which goes far to support the claim that is made for Oktima that he is the best mannered man in .lapan. After the explosion, which had killed his ser vants and horses, besides shattering his leg, he was lying .in his oflice in an agony of pain, yet he was able to say smilingly to a foreign statesman who was taking lea've of him, "Excuse me, sir, jor my im politeness in not soeing- you to the door."—*' Pall Mall Gazette." Providing its builder accepts cer tain conditions, the British War Office will put any aeroplane thr ough the military acceptance . test. v

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Dunmunkle Standard And [?]urtoa Advertiser. PUBLISHED WEEKLY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1914. LOCALISMS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 2 October 1914

DUNMUNKLE STANDARD And   MURTOA ADVERTISER     PUBLISHED WEEKLY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1914. LOCALISMS. The manager of the Freezing Com- pany (Mr. Halliday) informs us that 14,445 lambs and sheep were put through at the works during the past week. Every effort is being made to get lambs lifted promptly to relieve sellers in their present difficulty, but owing to the unexpectedly large num- bers offering from the northern area some little' delay has arisen which makes it necessary for local suppliers to hold their stock somewhat longer than anticipated. 25,000 is the num- ber treated to date, which is but half the quantity already bought. The company is receiving a number of en- quiries from growers, who have lines of sheep which are partly fat, with a view to their having this class of stock sent in after the fat stock is finished, to be treated and stored on owners'   account; and the company is prepared to take as much stuff as possi...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

Dancing. "VTATIONAL DANC1NO CLASSES will -131 bo conducted in the Mechanics' Hall, Murtoa, every Monday afternoon ftt four o'clock. Instructress—MISS JESSIE M. THORNE, of Horsham ; pupil of Pipe Major A. B. Murray of Adelaide. Miss Thome's pupils h^ve been successful in every competition whero they have entered, in this State and in South Aus tralia. Classes prepared for Juvenile Balls and Conceits. Fees strictly in advance. Terms on ap plication at the Hall every Monday afternoon at 3.45 before classes assemble. Why Should Women Suffer? OLl) time logic accepted it as a matter of cold fact that women were made to suffer from girlhood to the grave. What a monstrous doctrine. A book dealing with the matter of pain and suffering as affecting womenfolk, and whi'/h tells how thousands have been restored by a simple homo treat ment to permanent health after five years of pain, will be sent free to anyone who cuts out this advt. and sends it to Dept. A IS, Ladies' College of Health, Phair'...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

Great Stock of Fancy Goods, ^ AND V."" ' CHOICE BOOKS il SWT, H. M. PEPPER, News Agent, Stationer, Bookseller, Tobacconist, Music Seller, and Hairdresser, DUNCAN STREET ONLY, MURTOA. MACDONALD BROS., Builders and Contractors, Timber Merchants, etc, MIIKT « A. WE are prepared to build Houses of every description (Brick or Weather board) complete, or any other class of building entrusted to us, sup plying the best materials and workmanship at LOWEST RATES. Write or call on us for a quote. Designs submitted. Estimates free. Wo also quote for the whole of the materials required for a building. Send us a sketch. We will make up the quantities. STOCKS OF Hardwood, Ridging, All kinds of Softwood, Springhead and Wire Nails, Pickets, Builders' Ironmongery, Split Palings, All kinds of Locks and Lock Sets, Droppers, Water-pipe Taps and Fittings, Jarrah, Bricks, Lime and Cement, Ornamental Jarrah Pickets, Joinery and Shop Fittings Skirtings, (a speciality) Mouldings, Tanks, Batlis, etc., made o...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ladies' Column. STUFFED ONIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

Ladies' Column. ♦ STUFFED ONIONS. Spanish or large sized Bermuda onions are best for this dish. Peel the onions, and from the stalk end take out the centre of the onions. Put them in a pan .of boil in,c; salted water, and cook for ten minutes. Then lay the onions, opening down, on a clean cloth to absorb the water. Mako a stuffing of chopped chicken nnd ham in tlic proportion of two of chicken to one 01 ham, or to one tablcspoontul of bread crumbs. Chop the onion hearts removed before boiling, a'ld them to the other ingredients with a tablespoon ftll of oiled butter, pepper and salt to taste. Moisten with a little white stock. Fill the onions with this mixture, and place them in a baking tin, containing water to the depth of one inch. Sprinkle the onions with bread, crumbs, cover j with tin, and bako in a hot oven I for one hour, or unti! the onions are I tender, but retaining their shape. I Remove the cover long enough to | brown the onions lightly before they are taken from the ov...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A NEW CARD GAME. "WOMEN ARE TRUMPS." [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

A NEW CARD GAME. c " WOMEN ARE TRUMPS." The last word in card games is I "Women Are Trumps" (says the "New York World). Have you tried it? No? Well, you will ! find it simple, absorbing, entertain ing, instructive. It is played w ith fifty-two cards, the same number as in the ordinary pack, but there all similitude ceases. Spades, hearts, clubs, and dia monds are done away with : into the discord with them go kings, knaves, and aces. Only the queens are left, and of these are a plenty, for this is a sulTrage game intended to advance the cause of vctes for women; likewise the ex chequer of the same-price, one dol lar per rack. And who wants kings, to say no thing ol' idle knaves, with their well-known pernicious habit of stealing from queens, in a strictly feminine pack. Mrs. John King Van Rensselaer has mothered the new game ; Phila delphia is its birthplace. The lady is one of the foremost social leaders of the . Quaker City ; also an ardent exponent of suffragism. Incident ally sh...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Best Letters. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

The Best Letters. 1 A letter that shall be worth keep ing for other than purely practical or sentimental reasons takes time— and that rarest of all kinds of time, leisure. It needs some mind and at least a fraction of n heart. And, above'all. two real human be- | ings, and two alone, are essential. For the correspondence, that anybody may read is worth nobody's trouble. The best letters, therefore, are those between two friends (friends, of course, who may alfo be brothers or mother and son), arid probably the best of the best are those between friends of a different sex. That difference is a kind of leaven. It is like a flicker of summer lightning, in ,the quiet night. It adds the salt of unconscious antagonism, the sweetness of a baffling sympathy. It is a thing of quite extraordinary potentialities. And so long as love nods his small head over his arrows, and, for dreaming, for bears to shoot, all is v'ell. For love-letters are truly not let ters at all but lyrics in prose, or no...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Doctor and Tiger. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

Doctor and Tiger. 1 When it became known that the best shot in the company was go ing into the jungle to compass the death of a terrible tiger, the sur geon-major of the regiment, an en thusiastic curio-collector, at once buttonholed him. "Remember, Atkins,'' said / he, "I bespeak the skin at your own price." "All right, sir," said Atkins. The surgeon-major was netting butterflies on the outskirts of the jungle that evening when he saw Atkins running towards liim. "Shot him ?" shouted the surgeon major. "Yes, sir !" breathlessly replied the flying Nimrod. "How much for the skin ?" "Five quid, sir !" The doctor gave Atkins the money. "Where's the skin ?" he cried. "Behind you, sir !" came the re ceding answer. The doctor looked, and saw the skin, with the tiger in it, coming open-mouthed and bleeding from a scratch where Atkins had "shot " . it. The doctor didn't get the tiger's skin, but the tiger nearly got the doctor's. An enormous Russian biplane has taken up 16 passengers for l....

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Hanged for Signing Four Names. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

Hanged for Signing Four Names. ■. ■ 1 People have not always been allow ed the pleasure of having as many names as they wish. Four hun dred years ago not even a middle name was allowed in England. It was illegal. The old English law was definite and admitted of no infraction of its ruling. The only exception made to this regulation was in the case of per sons of Royal rank. If they wish ed, they, could boast a middle name, but woe - to the person of ordinary rank who was sufficiently unwise or obstinate to insist on having more than two appellations. For the first olTenCe he would likcly be tied to a whipping-post and severely lashed. For a second of fence he would endure some more lasting .punishment, perhaps the re moval of his thumbs or his ears, and if he persisted in his stubborn ness he would be hanged. There is a case on record of a man who. insisted on signing four names every time he wrote his sig nature. He passed through all the legal stages of punishment until he was fin...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LATEST ITEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

LATEST ITEMS! The Russians are sweeping on, ancS are within 90 miles of Budapest The Aisne country is like a rabbit, warren. It is estimated in Berlin that GTetT many has lost 300,000 men to date. An aerial raid is to be made orj London, and the Kaiser has promised} to make Count Zeppelin Generalissimo, of the Air Fleet.. The Allies are determined' to weap down the German resistance on the Aisne. Paris is more cheerful by ths flood of 'good news. The Kaiser's latest council of war has been turbulent, and imputations on> the Crown Prince have been angrily j resented by his father., I Anthony Wilding, has joined; thee Royal Marines. Messrs Young Bros, report that not withstanding the dry season, they, hav©* sold at their various offices during the past week or so, well over 50,000 fat lajabs- and. sheep. The principal buyers were- Messrs. Jno. Cooke andi ; Co., Collins-street, Melbourne. The-, quality of the stock generally was; first-class, and considerable numbers; are yet to be ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

jy/£ETHODIST CHURCH, MURTOA. Sunday. October 11. II—Rev. W. Allen. 7—Supply.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Mechanical Employment Bureau. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

A Mechanical Employment Bureau. A mechanical device for bringing together the man nncl the job has been invented by a Californiau. It consists of an upright cabinet with a number of glass-covered cases, each of which shows a card with an inscription something like this : "Wanted—A Butcher. Wages, 3dol. a day.' German preferred. References." Enough information is placed on the card> and visible through the glass, so that the applicant can tell if he can fill the requirements. If so he drops 25c. in the slot, opens the cabinet, anci takes out the card, which carries the address upon the reverse. If he obtains the position, he •has paid only' a quarter instead of the exorbitant fee demanded by some. agencies, while if he is un successful he can get his money back by taking the card to the main of fice. Only one card for each job is placed in the cabinet, so there is no : crush ■ at the door of the employer, which is a good- tiling for both par ties. The machines .are placed in put&g...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REVERSE IN WEST AFRICA.. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 9 October 1914

REVERSE IN WEST" AFRICA.. Their last cartridge expended, their numbers appallingly reduced,, and at" the end of a desperate- fight against terribly overwhelming odds, a small' British force surrendered to the Ger mans in .Namaqualand. The news comes from Reuter's cor respondent with an expedition into the souther portion of German. South-West Africa. Writing on October 1, he says r— " We have sustained a reverse Aa. attempt was being made to cross through a narrow defile. Our force consisted of two squadrons of the First South African Mounted Rifles, and a section of Transvaal artillery. The advance guard occupied a waterholty and it was thought the Germans had: letired. " We were suddenly attacked by : 2,000 of the enemy, who had ten gunsi The British suffered heavily, Every one of the gunners was killed or wounded, only the lieutenant in coim mand escaping unhurt. " Only when the British ammuni tion ran out did the fighb end. This; stage was reached at esooek The South: Africans t...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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