ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
382,303 results
Many Attractions In Music Week Programme [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Many Attractions In Music Week By ROBERT C. McC'Al.L Programme The dominant feature of this year's Music Week in N.S.W. is to be the City of Sydney Eisteddfod. The official opening will take place at the Town Hall on August 19, when the children's choirs will provide a festival programme. Richard Tauber Music Sunday, as usual, will be ob- served throughout the State with special services in the churches, afternoon con- certs in the city, and band programme in the parks. The Musical Exhibition will be opened on August 21 at the Blaxland Galleries. It should be thronged with visitors every day, for on view will be a big collection of curious and antique instruments, manuscripts, and other objects of musical interest. Lectures and recitals, also, will be heard daily at the exhibí- tion. Another Monday event will be the musicale arranged by the Queen Vic- toria Club. Apart from Eisteddfod sessions, Tues- day will be notable for a recital by the school choir of St. Anthony of Padua. The ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Radio Plays & Revues How to Remedy Some Defects [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Radio Plays & Revues By SARABANDE Hardly a week goes by but we hear some musical show over the air. It seems to me that there are some vital points which are not realised by either artists or producers, and which, when re- cognised and remedied, might add considerably to the enjoy- ment of the entertainments. How to Remedy Some Defects FIRSTLY, there is the unfortunate fact that the female speaking voice, for some reason, does not come over the air as well as the male. That being the case, it is necessary for women to speak comparatively slowly on most occa- sions. Rushed speech is always difficult to follow on the stage. When it is made over the air it is doubly difficult. When a female voice makes it over the air it is trebly so (no pun intended). This disadvantage also makes it im- perative for the female singer to enun- ciate her words especially distinctly. Many singers are not kind to their audi- ences in the matter of diction. Over the air, poor diction becomes uninte...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Intimate Jottings Do You Like— [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Do You Like— MILANO GARTI'S revival of the   Sunday "small and early" party? Peggy Moore's party of 40 for the Science Ball? Audrey Nicholson's voice describing newsreels? Mr. Chester Garling's launch picnics? Architect Helen Turner's "examina- tion" habit? Mrs. Stephen Crowhurst's annual move—this time to Bellevue Hill? Latest in Offices Touring one of our big city furnish- ing shops the other day, I had to "hand it" to the ingenuity of the business man who has had the building converted to his own uses. Looking for a lift to take me to an upper floor, I discovered that the four "elevators" placed in a group, two fac- ing two, had been transformed into very adequate and comfortable offices for the managerial staff. The idea struck me as being a rather quaint one, and as the lifts are of good size they make large enough offices for desk, chairs, telephone, and other necessary equipment, not forgetting carpet and radiator. Let me add that the "offices" are stationary, on...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
ORGANDIE, NET, TULLE Create Lovely Inexpensive Summer Evening Frocks [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

ORGANDIE, NET, TULLE Create Lovely Inexpensive Summer Evening Frocks   By ANTOINE Is there anything more becoming or fascinating for evening wear than crisp trans- parent organdies, soft nets, or billowing diaphanous tulle? I think not. There are many people in Aus- tralia to-day who appreciate good clothes but are unable to buy them because of the expense, so I've picked out five frocks from the latest American photographs, all of which could be copied quite easily, and as the materials —organdie, net, and tulle—are very moderately priced, the en- tire cost would not come to much * DESSE: Dinner gown, organ-   die jacket and hat. Virginia Cherril, lovely Metro Goldwyn Mayer actress, models an eveninj frock of heavy white crepe, cut very simply and on the cross,   with a jacket of crisp organdie of a plaid pattern in green and black on a white ground. A large bow ties the neck, and the same sized bow finishes the enormously puffed sleeves at th...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
—5 for BEST RECIPE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

£5 for BEST RECIPE There are so many appetising ways of serving oranges that our culinary expert became convinced, as she literally waded through the entries in the "best orange" recipe competition, that citrus growers should all be millionaires! FOR these frosty nights can you imagine a more tasty dish than orange dumplings? A reader from the country wins £5 for this seasonable pud- ding recipe. Next week there will be another £5 prize for the best recipe submitted, and 2/6 consolation prizes for each recipe published. It may be a sweet, a savory, or a cake. Think over the dishes that have been popular with your family and send the recipe along. BEST ORANGE RECIPES The First Prize of £5 goes to:-- Miss P. McRae, 108 Ferry St., Forbes, N.S.W. ORANGE DUMPLINGS Take 2 oranges, 3 cupfuls breadcrumbs, ¾ cup sugar, ½ cup melted butter, ¾ cup flour, 1 gill milk, 1 well-beaten egg. Mix all the dry ingredients together with the butter, rind and juice of oranges, milk and egg. Pour mixture i...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Things That Happen [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Her Lucky Color MY neighbor . . . an elderly maiden lady . . . has just had a reading of her lucky days and lucky colors. She told us her lucky color was green, and that she intended dying her aprons that shade. The following afternoon we were amused to see not only her aprons, but two pairs of blankets, dyed green, hang- ing out to dry.—"Mack," Ararat, Vic- toria. * * * Not On the Air CALLING at the office of a Sydney broadcasting station last week, I saw this notice stuck on a window over a typiste's desk: "If you want to see the time, will you please ask a member of the staff, instead of opening the win- dow to see the Railway clock. Every time the window is opened a gust of wind freezes everybody and blows papers in all directions. Thank you!"—"Simon," Kirribilli.   That's What You Get A MARRIED woman teacher, out Dubbo way, whose husband had a steady job, decided to resign to make room for one of hundreds of young teachers for whom no vacancies can be found. A fort...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
...WHAT MY PATIENTS ASK ME [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

***WHAT MY PATIENTS ASK ME **BY A DOCTOR** NO NEED FOR WORRY Question: What troubles can I expect at "the change of life?" Don't expect any. The "change of life" isn't a disease, but an ordinary precaution of nature to save woman the task of childbearing when her body lacks the elasticity and virility of youth. A lot of old wives' tales have filled many women with the idea that the change of life will bring on sickness from which there is no escape. Many women have no worries at all at this time, unless it be a few hot flushes and perhaps occa- sional despondency. The latter is the chief trouble, as a matter of fact and "a nervous type of constitution is likely to magnify the occasion." The briefest and best advice to a healthy woman concerning the change of life is "For- get it." ANTE-NATAL TREATMENT Question: How soon after knowledge of becoming pregnant should one visit the doctor who is to take charge of the case? Immediately. Many doctors quote an inclusive fee for ante-natal t...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
COMPACTS A PROMINENT NOSE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

COMPACTS     A PROMINENT NOSE I have a very prominent nose. This makes me very self-conscious. Can you advise me of a remedy?—JILL (Bronte). Make-up will help to make your nose look smaller, and to begin with, you should use a powder a shade darker than your skin. A light powder makes even a small nose look prominent. Try a touch of rouge just beneath the tip of the offending member. Otherwise, a careful choice of hairdressing will help matters. Keep the hair close to your head, and bring it forward just below the temples. If your hair is bobbed, allow it to grow so that the ends are not on a level with the tip of the nose. DRY LIPS My lips are so very dry, although I always use lip salve. Is there a cure for this trouble? — D.H. SEATED with the knees perfectly straight, lean for- ward and touch the toes, slowly raise the arms, and go backwards until the body is in a lying position. (Newcastle). Before applying lip rouge, it is a good plan to massage the li...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THE FASHION PARADE The NEW EVENING SILHOUETTES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

The NEW EVENING SILHOUETTES Fragile FABRICS Are RUFFLED And Shirred BY JESSIE TATT Evening clothes come in all     designs this season. There     is no longer any need to cram one's figure-if it is rather larger than we would wish-into a tight swathed       dress which accentuates our bad points, just because "everyone else" is doing so. There are so many different silhou- ettes-not just one clear blocked out one-that there should be no difficulty in finding one to suit you, however large or fat you may feel yourself to be. There are five silhouettes that stand out clearly in all the French collections. The one with the square, box-like top given by the wrap is very good if you are tall. The dresses for this are "slim, but not slinky," because the skirts have swishy dust ruffles inside the hems to make them stand away from the ankles. The silhouette that is slim to the hips and wide below is a...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CLEVER IDEAS HINTS FROM READERS HINTS FROM READERS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

CLEVER IDEAS   HINTS FROM READERS \_>LI_ V LIV HINTS FROM READERS TO REMOVE stains from a white por- celain bath or sink, wash well with soap and hot water, and dry thoroughly. Then get a clean cloth saturated with kero- sene, and rub the bath all over. After this is completed, polish with a soft, dry cloth. This will remove all stains and leave the bath looking like new.—10/ to Miss M. Hooke, Shellharbour Road, Pt. Kembla. WASTE SCRAPS of material and cot- tons can be kept off the floor when machining, by making a paper "sugar- plum," pinning it together, then catch- ing its top on one of the drawers at the side of the sewing machine. This can be thrown away when full, and after work is finished no litter is left on the floor.—Miss D. Hayes, "Hillmont," Thornleigh. WHEN MENDING silk stockings a very useful hint is to get an old stock-   ing, as near the shade as the one to be mended, and cut the silk across the leg. The silk will unravel quite easily, a...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
GENL. BOOTH Biography CAUSES STIR! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

GENL. BOOTH Biography CAUSES STIR ! Because Miss Catherine Bramwell Booth is alleged to have broken faith, and published personalities of a subtle nature in her biography of her father's life (the late General Bramwell Booth), her book, when it reaches Sydney, will not be recognised by the Salvation Army. General Higgins (head of the Army) has ordered that the book be not accepted as having received the official Salva- tion Army imprimatur. COLONEL HAWORTH, manager of the Army stores and publications in Sydney, in an interview with a representative of the Australian Women's Weekly, said that although the book had been banned from an Army standpoint, it would, no doubt, be sold by other bodies in Sydney. "As women's social secretary of Great Britain—the highest position of its kind," said Colonel Haworth, "Miss   Booth was allowed time to write her book. She promised not to introduce any damaging personalities, but, I un- derstand, broke faith with those who trusted her....

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Tree-Lovers' GALA Arbor Day's Spreading Influence [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

    Tree-Lovers GALA * * *     Arbor Day's Spreading Influence Shakespeare's opinion of "the man who has no music in his soul" might be applied with equal force to the   man who has no love of trees—who regards them as a LATER generations have wakened to a "tree sense" and to the enormity of wholesale tree destruction. Efforts are now made to atone for past ravages, and to make up for at least some of the damage done. It must have been with a deep sense of satisfaction that the late Sir Joseph Carruthers, that ardent tree lover, watched the development of an annual Arbor Day in New South Wales. In 1890 he was responsible for the first celebra- tion of this national day in the Ryde Public School grounds. This year the headmaster of that school will be officially presented with a photograph of that first organised tree blot on the land- scape, and whose first thought when he acquires a piece of ground is to de- nude it o...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THE MIRROR OF SYDNEY BY JANE ANNE SEYMOUR [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

            THE MIRROR OF SYDNEY           BY JANE ANN SEYMOUR WHAT a number of well-known Sydney people left by the Orsova on Saturday. Joan Sayers, with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Sayers, went for a trip to Colombo; Susan   Spencer, who has just returned from "Collymongle," went off on a six months' holiday. It is really a health trip for Susan, as she is recuperating from a serious ill- ness. Enid Comerford left to join her sister, Mrs. Geoffrey Godfrey, in London, and Dolly Wade and her sister were bound for Colombo. Maureen O'Moore, that charming actress, and her brand-new husband, left to settle in London. * * * ISN'T "Odd's Pantry" a lovely name? It has been chosen by Miss "Odd" Milne for the pretty little tea rooms she has opened near the Edgecliff Post Office. Miss Milne is a sister of Miss May Milne, one of Sydney...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

because such a little is needed to flavour any dish!     Besides being the world's greatest sauce, it is so highly concentrated that just a few drops, before and after cooking, give that delight- ful piquancy to the food. Write for valuable receipe book FREE. LEA & PERRINS (AUST.) LTD., 96 White Street, Leichhardt, N.S.W. Use this coupon: INSIST ON LEA & PERRINS SAUCE NAME . . . . . ADDRESS. . . . .

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 5 August 1933

LADY FARMER : "Hadn't we better move Daisy out of the sun in case her milk turns?"

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 5 August 1933

J. K. EWERS, the West Australian author of "Boy and Silver," who has written a new novel, "Money Street," which will be reviewed next week.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 5 August 1933

JUMPED OUT OF A FAIRY TALE. A prize-winning fancy costume at the Blue Alps Vigoro Fancy Dress Ball held in aid of unemployed girls at North Sydney School of Arts. The dress cost 4d.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 5 August 1933

Constance Cummings, whose marriage to Mr. Ben Levy, the brilliant playwright, has just been announced. Mr. Levy is a nephew of Mrs. Sep Levy. Miss Cummings has recently signed a con- tract with British International at Elstree Studios, London.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x