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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. has a right to 320 acres of land. May the Great Spirit be their guide. i8 Every one who is trying to lead a good life should try to lead a winsome and courteous one. By abandoning gentle ness of disposition and graciousness of word and deed, we throw away means of growth and an effective weapon. Coarse Christians little know how often they play into the enemy's hands. "Charity thinketh no evil," much less repeats it. There are two good rules which ought to be written on every heart: "Never believe anything bad about any body unless you posit ively know it is true; never tell even that unless you feel that it is absolutely necessary and that God is listening while you tell it." One sentiment fills our heart at the beginning of the New Year. It is voiced in the greetings of the season happiness. Thousands and millions of people wish one another a "Hap py New Year" and we, too, join in the chorus and wish our many friends and benefactors and our enemies (if we have...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

19 these young souls to their care, will demand the same souls at their hands. The Indian Advocate. It is not safe, says-the Working Boy, to trust people who are habitually inaccurate in their work. Even with the best intentions in the world, they become dishonest. Before they are aware of it, the habit of inaccuracy extends to their state ments. They do not take pains to be thorough in anything they uudertake, even in clearly expressing the truth. These people never carry much weight in a community, however honest in principle they may be, because no reliance can be placed on their words or work. You cannot depend on what they tell you. If they are superiors, they are discred ited; if they are at the bar, the judges always take their state ments with some margin; if they are in business, they soon get a bad name for inaccuracy. In fact, whatever those peo ple do, they are placed at a disadvantage because of their hab it of inacuracy. There is a great difference between going just r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

3HS 20 The Indian Advocate. Catholic Educational Effort in the Two Territories. ' By FATHER KETCHAM, Director of Catholic Indian Missions Washington. D. C, irJpc. MBMI ERHAPS no portion of the United States has been the scene of greater missionary activity on the Ppart of different religious denominations than the Indian Tprritnrv. From an narlv date the Mis sion school was considered the most effective means of Christianizing the tribes and moulding them into civilized peoples. No one can look, without prejudice, upon con ditions in the Indian Territory, and question the marvelous results wrought by the triple agencies, the Mission school always a busy center of re ligious work; commerce, that potent factor in the develop ment of individuals and nations; intermarriage of Indians and Caucasians, the consequence of which can never be fully est imated. Some there are who profess to find it difficult to decide which of these three causes has contributed most to advance the aboriginal A...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. 21 only was she hampered by poverty and a dearth of mission priests, but for a number of years the doors were barred against her entrance The Chactaws and Chickasaws were the first to give her admittance. It is useless to indulge in criticism. It is quite natural that the religious organizations which already pos sessed the field should wish to accomplish alone the great work they had undertaken, should disregard the wishes of the very few Catholics of each tribe, since the great bulk of the people were not in sympathy with the ancient faith. From a Catholic viewpoint, the Church could bide her time, for she knew that in this country, as in all others, the day must come when her energies for the salvation of souls and the uplifting of society would be called into action. If space permitted, it would be interesting to revert to the early labors of Catholic missionaries among the Five tribes, concerning which faint traditions still linger among the peo ple. Occasi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

22 The Indian Advocate. Missouri and Kansas. Among those who essayed to do this work, the best remembeted are the saintly Jesuit prince priest, Father Ponziglione, or "Father Paul," as he was af fectionately called, and Father Bononcino of Kansas; and Father Michael SmVthbf Arkansas. This last indefatigable worker seems to have penetrated every nook and corner of the Indian Territory. The Jesuit school for Indians at Osage Mission, Kas., in its day one of the most noted institutions in the West, at tracted pupils from all over the Indian Territory. A number of Cherokees and Creeks sent their daughters to convents in Fort Smith, Jefferson, Shreveport, Memphis and St. Louis. Choctaw girls attended the Sisters' academies of Texarkana, Clarksville, Sherman and Denison; the institutions of the two places last named have always been held in high esteem and extensively patronized by the Chickasaws. The Pottawato mies and Osages came to the Territory from Kansas: the form er from St. Mary's...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. 23 village. Among several creditable buildings it boasted the most beautiful church in the country, and, in 1896, the Mon astery was raised to the rank of an Abbey. To the illustri ous disciples of St. Benedict, the civilization of Europe may, in great part, be ascribed, aud nowhere were they more success ful in establishing peace, encouraging industry and multipling seats of learning than in England, thus meriting the undying gratitude of the entire English-speaking race. Strange, is it not, to find these Benedictines, hundreds of years later, hard at work among the Pottawatomies of the Indian Territory, transforming the wilderness into a garden spot, and lighting there the beacon torch of religion and education! With what success they wrought, especially in the vicinity of Sacred Heart, the people of Oklahoma can testify. The Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions established two large schools in the Osage reservation: St. Louis school for girls, near Pawhuska, in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

24 The Indian Advocate. attend. The Catholic Church conducts, at Guthrie, two schools for white and one for colored children. She has another school for negroes at Langston. She has schools for white children at Oklahoma City, Perry, Ponca City, Shaw nee, El Reno, Norman, Lexington, Renfrow, Chickasha, Krebs, Lehigh and Coalgate. This year the largest enrollment, 350 pupils, is found at Krebs, while the smallest, thirty-five pupils, is recorded at Renfrow. The total number of children in Catholic schools is 2,878; of these 641 are Indians (probably 250 full-bloods), 2,037 white and 200 negroes. The Catholic population of the two territories exceeds 20,000. The Catholic Indians number not less than 5,000, while there are at least 300 negro, and more than 17,000 white Catholics. It will readily be seen, considering the vastness of the field and the obstacles in her way, that the Catholic Church has made a creditable effort to provide educational facilities for the youth of Oklahoma an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. 25 tunities that have showered thick and fast during the past twelve years upon the Catholic Church in the twin terri tories. All of which doubtless but preludes the time when the sheaves of an abundant harvest will be garnered. Conspicuous among the devoted sisters who have been successful in training the youth of the territories are Mother Joseph, Mother Catherine and Sister Mary Frances, of the Sisters of Mercy; Sister Patricia among the Franciscans; Mother Paula and Mother Joseph among the Benedictines; Sister De Sales and Sister Eugenie, of the Sisters of the St. Roseof Lima. No sketch of this kind will ever be complete that fails to bestow becoming recognition on the brilliant talents, indom itable zeal and remarkable achievements of Rev. Mother M. Virginia, of the sisters of St. Joseph, whose name is enshrined in the memories of the people of Muskogee, Antlers and Quapaw. Finally, in giving honor to whom honor is due, the char itable friends who have gene...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

26 The Indian Advocatk. I PACK MY TRUNK. What shall I pack up to carry From the old year to the new? I'll leave out the frets that harry Thoughts unjust and doubts untrue. Angry words ah, how I rue them! Selfish deeds and choices blind Any one is welcome to them I I shall leave them all behind. Plans? the trunk would need be double, Hopes? they'd burst the stoutest lid. Sharp ambitions! last year's stubble! Take them, old year! keep them hid! All my fears shall be forsaken, All my failures manifold; Nothing gloomy shall be taken To the new year from the old. My contentment would 'twere greater! All the courage I possess; All my trust there's not much weight there! All my faith, or more or less. And I'll pack my choicest treasure, Smiles I've seen and praises heard, Memories of unselfish pleasure, v Cheery looks, the kindly word. Ah, my riches silence cavil! To my rags I bid adieu! Like the Croesus I shall travel . From the old year to the new. Amos R. Wells in Catholic Columbian. A ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

Thk Indian Advocate. 27 cjg) How He Became A Great Sculptor. (Sb I T may sound strange to American ears, accus tomed to consider European Bishops and offi cials as too grand to stoop to work-day comforts, to hear that Bishop George of Muenster, in Westphalia, went out walking one day into the country in his ordinary priest's dress, and pull ing out his German pipe thought he would so lace himself with a quiet smoke. As he was ac coutred that day, a stranger could hardly have recognized the prelate's dignity, wearing as he did an ordinary black cossack, over which was slipped a light overcoat, the only distinguishing marks of his rank being a green band to his broad-brimmed hat, orn amented at the ends with purple tossels, a purple front to his Roman collar and violet buttons to his cossack. As the good man was fumbling in his pockets for a pipeful of tobacco he found he had not a crumb about him. His hunger for a smoke increased with the lack of material, and he went wandering on th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

28 The Indian Advocate. self questioning the lad. r ,i i j , fK0 innff hours of vour watch "Wny, now UU y uu jJciaa wiv- iwj;, - j over your sheep, my fine boy?" "I sleep some, I pray a little sometimes," said the boy, showing his beads and prayer-book, and then I amuse myself cutting out little things like this figure of our Lord," he add- pf ed, holding out a miniature crucifix carved by hand. The Bishop took the little article, and looKing at ir nar rowly discoveied, to his amazement, that the workmanship showed uncommon talent. I "Why, my boy," he queried, did you make this yourself and without even ordinary tools? m "Yes, Father," he answered modestly. "I have several like that, and have an image or two of the Blessed Mother at home." "And are the others as good as this?"' "I think they are, and some are even better, if I can judge." "Well, I'll be able to judge anyway, if you can show them to me." "Where do you live, Father, and I can bring them to you Sunday afternoon?" "Do, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

Thk Indian Advocate. 29 Muenester. His chance was indeed fortunate, for no one in the country could be more solicitous for art and artists than the celebrated prelate. His zeal and munificence in decorat ing his churches and native city with the products of the chisel and pencil, are proved by the monuments which yet stand in streets and temples to verify the statement. "My dear son," said the Bishop, when he had critically examined the crucifixes and figures, "these are well done; and if you give me satisfactory answers as to your parents and means, I will surely be pleased to help you. What is your name?" "Achtermann, and may it please your lordship." "Have your parents any means?" "None but what we earn on a bit of ground and I get for herding sheep. Both my parents are pious Catholics and have tried to raise me in the practice of their faith." "Very good, I only want to be certain you are deserving, as I believe you are. Now, they will let you go to school at my request, and, of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

3 The Indian Advocate. IMA fWk by. Friedrich was touched to tears and praised his piety. d o 3& Help the Catholic Indian Schools. According to the latest Governmental reports there are in the United States 272,023 Indians, more than 100000 of whom are Catholics. To provide adequately for the Christian education of the children of these Catholic Indians there should be school accommodation for 10,000 Catholic Indian boys and girls. These figures speak for themselves. They appeal, and appeal strongly, to Catholics to contribute at least enough money to enable the Catholic Indian Bureau to take care of the 2,000 Indian boys and girls now in the Indian schools. As Father Ketcham very truly says: "The suspension of the schools because of the failure of 12,000,000 Catholics to contribute annually $140,000 lor their support would be a stig ma on the Catholic Church. For a number of years to come boarding schools among the Indians will be an absolute necessity. Were these schools discon...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

3i Short Speeches and Curt Correspondence. The Indian Advocate. When peopleare driven half distracted with long speeches and sigh for brevity, it is delightful to call up recollections of the possibility of saying much to the point in a few words. We some times wish that our accomplished legislators would take a lesson from the first speech of the Maori member of the New Zealand General Assembly: "England is a great nation. The Maoris are a great people. The English have called us to this great house. We sit here. They have pounded my cow at Wangunui. I have done." On one occasion Daniel Webster finished a speech with: "Gentlemen, there's the national debt it should be paid; yes, gentlemen, it should be paid. I'll pay it myself. How much is it?" A modern instance of the efficacy of brevity in a good cause may.be cited. M. Dupanloup, the eloquent Bishop of Orleans, preaching in behalf of the distressed workmen of Rouen, contented himself with saying: "This is no time for long sermons...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

32 The Indian Advocate. iirst case was likely to be hardly contested, he asked: "What is the amount in question?" "Two dollars," said the plain tiff's counsel. "I'll pay it," said the judge, handing him over the money. "Call the next case." An editor, who, writing to a Connecticut brother: "Send full particulars of the flood" (meaning an inundation at that place), received for reply: "You will find them in Genesis." Mr. Kendall, some time Uncle Sam's postmaster-general, wanting some information as to the source of a river, sent the following note to a village postmaster: "Sir! This De partment desires to know how far the Tombigbee river runs up? Respectfully yours, etc." By return mail came: Sir! The Tombigbee does not run up at all; it runs down. Very respectfully yours, etc." Kendall, not appreciating his sub ordinate's humor, wrote again: "Sir! Your appointment as postmaster is revoked; you will turn over the funds, etc., pertaining to your office to your successor." Not at all d...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

Vol. XV. The Indian Advocate FEBRUARY, 1903. The Little Seed, A little seed lay in the ground, And soon began to sprout; "Now which of all the flowers around, It mused, "shall I come out?" "The lily's face is fair and proud, But just a trifle cold; , .The rose, I think, is rather loud, And, then, its fashion's old," "The violet is very well, But a flower I'd never choose; Nor yet the Canterburg bell I never cared for blues." "Petunias are by far too bright. And vulgar flowers, beside; The primrose only blooms at night, And peonies spread to wide." And so it criticised each flower, This supercilous seed, Until it woke one summer hour And found itself a weed, No. 2 m S N,

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

34 The Indian Advocate. The Indians. : WT7T?"!? Je .. Jn. -Vq fot-Q rtf fVieico i iinfnrfunatfi be- ings, much to awaken our sympathy, and much to disturb the sobriety ot our judgment; mucn which may be urged to excuse their own atroci ties; much in their characters which betray us into an involuntary admiration. What can be more eloquent than their history? By a law of nature they seemed destined to a slow but sure extinction. Everywhere at the approach of the white man they faded away. We hear the rustl ing of their footsteps, like that of the withered leaves of au tumn, and they are gone forever. They pass mournfully by us, and they return no more. Two centuries ago and the smoke of their wigwams, and the fires of their councils rose in every valley, from the Hudson bay to the farthest Florida, from the ocean to the Mississ ippi and the lakes. The shouts of victory and the war-dance rang through the mountains and the glades. The thick ar rows and the deadly tomahaw whistled throu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 35 of savage life, they had its virtues also They were true to their country, their friends, and their homes. If they forgave not injury, neither did they forget kindness. If their vengen ance was terrible, their fidelity and generosity were uncon querable also. Their love, like their hatred, stopped not this side of the grave. But where are they? Where are the villagers and war riors and youth; the sachems and the tribes; the hunters and their families? They have perished; they are consumed. The wasting pestilence has not alone done the mighty work. No, nor famine nor war; there has been a mightier power; a moral canker, which has eaten into their heart cores a plague, which the touch of the white man communicated a poison which betrayed them to lingering ruin. The winds ot the At lantic fan not a single region which they can call their own. The ashes are cold upon their native hearths. The smoke no longer curls around their native cabins. They move on with slo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

36 The Indian Advocatk. wrong and perfidy; much of pity mingling with indignation: much of doubt and misgiving as to the past; much of painful recollections, much of dark forbodings. -Joseph Story. j a a& My Friend the Enemy. Who and what are our friends and who are our enemies? Some one may reply that our friends are those who please us and make us feel good, and our enemies are those who op pose us or cause us pain. We are likely to act as this was our idea of friends and enemies. I am sure that 1 used to do so, but as 1 grow older 1 am learning a good deal about my true friends and my real ene mies. I am bringing a good many things over from the list of my enemies to the list of my friends. I now say that my friends are all things that help me in any way, whether pleasantly or unpleasantly, whether they cause me joy or pain. Looking at it in this way I can say 1 have no enemies at all except my own faults, and that all the people whom 1 have anything to do with, and all the f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 37 u What Haye We Done for the Indians? j ixitl W MKiSf T-T T? nrfinln n( AT T-.r.-U C .-.., .-. 1 . . ,1 ,-. ,1 nn V Tiijy anisic ui itj i . juacpii oiuij uiioiuucu uu lug preceeding page, tells the sad story. But there is a bright and cheerful side to consider, and Rev. L. O., O F. M., in St. Anthony's Messenger , for November, shows it in a graphic manner. But, says he, in order to see it, one must forget New England and look to those regions which were explored and colonized by the French and Span ish. These two nations, formed bv a union of the Celtic, Roman and Teuton blood, were the only real and succeasful pioneers of true civilization in the New Wjjrld. Just as the hard, crude iron is thrust into the fire, and tempered whilst it cools down, in order to obtain a good, reliable blade, which will not bend or twist when used, so, too, the impetuosity of the Celt united to the burning am bition of the Roman, and tempered by the sound, solid phil osophy of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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