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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Business loans harder to come by in rural areas BLACKSBURG —If tobacco producers want to diversify or change careers, they may have trouble getting the money to do so. The results of a Virginia Tech study show that residents of rural areas in Southern Virginia may have trouble borrowing money to start a business. "There isn't a shortage of money—that's not the issue," explained Karen Mundy, communications coordinator for Virginia Tech's Rural Economic Analysis Program, which conducted the study. "The link that's missing is how to get the money." REAP conducted the study in 1997 after the 1996 Virginia General Assembly passed a resolution to examine the accessibility of capital in rural communities. The Satellite subscription has freebies RICHMOND —You'll receive $300 worth of coupons when you subscribe to PRIMESTAR digital satellite TV service between now and April 30. Any Virginia Farm Bureau Federation member can subscribe to PRIMESTAR, receive a discounted installat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Right to Farm laws under attack by state lawmakers RICHMOND —Along with the new year, Virginia farmers are preparing for new attacks on a law that protects them from unfair restrictions. Sen. Madison Marye, DShawsville, chairman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources, has prefiled a biil to revoke provisions of the Right to Farm Act for confined animal feeding operations of 300 animal units or more. "This is a frightening scenario for Virginia farmers," warned Wilrner Stoneman, senior assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "This bill would gut the Right to Farm Act." If the bill passes, no livestock operation would be protected from a locality that may want it shut down simply because of its smell, Stoneman said. "Even worse, anyone living near a farm could sue the farmer for almost any reason, such as smell, noise, dust or whatever," he added. Right to Farm laws protect farmers from unrea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Business loans harder to come by in rural areas BLACKSBURG —If tobacco pro- ducers want to diversify or change careers, they may have trouble getting the money to do so. The results of a Virginia Tech study show that residents of rural areas in Southern Virginia may have trouble borrowing money to start a business. "There isn't a shortage of money—that's not the issue," explained Karen Mundy, communications coordinator for Virginia Tech's Rural Economic Analysis Program, which conducted the study. "The link that's missing is how to get the money." REAP conducted the study in 1997 after the 1996 Virginia General Assembly passed a resolution to examine the accessibility of capital in rural communities. The Satellite subscription has freebies RICHMOND —You'll receive $300 worth of coupons when you subscribe to PRIMESTAR digital satellite TV service between now and April 30. Any Virginia Farm Bureau Federation member can subscribe to PRIMESTAR, receive a discounted install...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News AITC Board gets new members Jack King, vice president of forest resources for Chesapeake Corporation, and Donna Pugh Johnson, president of the Virginia Agribusiness Council, have been appointed to the board of directors of the Virginia Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom. King brings extensive knowledge of the forest industry and experience in education to the board. He has served as chairman of the New Kent County School Board and the Virginia School Board Association. He also serves as a board member on the Virginia Forestry Educational Foundation. Ms. Johnson has served as president of the agribusiness council since 1994. Before joining the agribusiness council, she was vice president of corporate services for Colonial Farm Credit, ACA, the state's largest rural and agricultural lender. Ms. Johnson has been a member of the AITC Advisory Committee since 1996 and is also a member of the Virginia Council of Farmer Cooperatives membership and educa- tion comm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Girls, women take on new roles for ag promotion Women care about agriculture. And many of our Farm Bureau women have been recognized for that concern. "It's an honor to help keep agriculture in the minds of everyone as well as informing individuals on the importance of agriculture to society," our new Miss Virginia Farm Bureau Anne Adkerson said in her acceptance speech. Miss Adkerson grew up on a Pittsylvania County grain and tobacco farm. Ag leaders want more specialists (Continued from page 2) frequency of state inspections of those plans and facilities. In addition, the 1999 General Assembly was expected to approve House Bill 1207 during the January/February session. This would require poultry producers to implement nutrient management plans. "The demand for nutrient management plans was already high because of all the state mandates, but House Bill 1207 significantly increases the demand," Stoneman said. Other groups have recognized the need for additional nutrien...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News President says people must feel appreciated Listening to them is vital By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—During his years in the military, law enforcement, insurance and agriculture, Bruce Hiatt has gained some wisdom in working with people. "We need to listen to people," said the soft-spoken, new president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "A lot of people have very good ideas. We should encourage them to be involved. There's a lot of potential out there and some people are just waiting to be asked." In addition, he pointed out, volunteers "don't expect anything monetarily, but they like to feel appreciated," he added. "We must let people know we appreciate them and we must be supportive of them." Hiatt, 58, was elected president on Dec. 3 by delegates at the VFBF Annual Convention in Roanoke. Hiatt, who has a apple and cherry orchard in the Cana community of Carroll County, had been vice president since 1988. He replaced the now-retired Wayne A...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Farmers don't want higher, leftover electric rates RlCHMOND—Electric deregulation is likely, but will commercial users and city dwellers buy up cheap electricity, leaving rural residents with higher rates? That's a question agriculture leaders and some in the electric utility industry are asking. State lawmakers are considering a proposal to deregulate the electric utility industry. Electric rates already dip as low as 5.5 cents per kilowatt hour in parts of Virginia. The average is 8.5 cents in the Old Dominion, said Mark Tubbs, manager of governmental affairs for the Virginia, Maryland and Delaware Association of Electric Cooperatives. That compares with rates as high as 13.5 cents in New Hampshire. "Some people don't see the potential for cost savings with deregulation because Virginia is already a low-rate state," said Mandi Smith, a legislative specialist for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. A large multi-state electric power company could conceivably raise ra...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News Old remedies sometimes best for good health It seems as if consumers are bombarded on a daily basis about the benefits associated with new "miracle" drugs. Diet pills, treatments for hair loss and drugs that prevent heartburn are just a few examples. The problem Is that new studies come out just as frequently, and often contradict previous findings. Who has time to keep up with the onslaught of information? Physicians and researchers continue to learn more about age-old treatments. Recent studies show that the benefits of some ancient remedies still hold Share safety tips with your children Perhaps the saddest aspect of U.S. violent crime statistics is the enormous number of children — more than 1 million—who are listed among the victims each year. But parents can give their children a few simple crime prevention techniques. (These are from Kids in Control, a personal safety curriculum for 8- to 10-year-olds developed in cooperation with the Boys and Girls Clubs of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Money for annual food tab earned by Feb. 9 By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist By Feb. 9, the average American family has earned enough money to purchase food for all of 1999. On average, American consumers spend only 10.7 percent of their disposable income for food, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. When applied to the calendar, that comes out to 40 f . ** IXT W % T BP" ' » fl %KJI m-w - -*- fl C^ — mfw wsmHM p i lill S I «M K JL'- %m|M^Bflte|jj iflH ' oBBj H | K M ■ Slit: wauls io In: a mom when sine grows op. He warils lo know when he'll get 1 unch, on jusl wanl ikem protected forever, Wketker it s protecting your family tkrougk koine, uuto or life insurance, we ve got ike coverage you need to plan [or ike future. Virginia Farm Bureau Insurance kelps you ke ikere for ike ones you love. 1 3 VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU TOWN & COUNTRY INSURANCE COMPANY HELPING YOU IS U)ll(lt W£ (If) b(!St VIR...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News Government restraint necessary ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.—The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's delegation of 75 joined 6,000 other farmers in attendance here and heard several nationally known farm and business leaders call for j more government restraint in regulatory matters affecting farmers. American Farm Bureau Federation President Dean Kleckner called for an immediate moratorium on regulations that he said are cutting deeply into the pocketbooks of the nation's farm families. Economist Richard Belzer, a self-appointed regulatory watchdog, said that Washington poli-cy-makers have prepared a bountiful platter of options for regulating the regulators. "But what seems to be served up is an inedible stew of failure." Tennessee Farm Bureau President Flavius Barker warned farmers that "if we don't get control of regulations, they'll soon get control of us." Barker argued that "federal regulatory agencies have been on autopilot for a long time," with few real administration o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Transition program would link farmers (Continued from page 1) Agricultural Statistics Service. "Quite a few people are working directly in agriculture and quite a few are working because of agriculture," Baker said. "Agriculture is what makes a place a nice place to live. If you didn't have agriculture in Virginia, Virginia wouldn't be what it is." Even Hollywood movie makers have come to the Old Dominion to film parts of movies on Virginia farms. Courter put together a task force, which compiled a report titled "Virginia Agriculture, 2010: A Transition Strategy." The year 2010 was chosen, Courter said, because "if we position ourselves, we would assure that farm assets don't turn into subdivisions. 2010 is when we hope to be well along the way to accomplishing this." Task force findings include: 50 percent of the U.S. farm population is 55 and older; 25 percent of the U.S. farm population is 65 and older and the average U.S. farmer is 52. Task force recommendations, r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cvand@vafb.com. I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be RECEIVED (not mailed) by the 10th of each month preceding the publication month. The September and October issues are combined, as well as the December and January issues. The deadline for the September/October issue is August 10 and the deadline for the December/January issue is...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Feb. 6: Virginia Cow-Calf Management Course, Blackstone, Feb. 10-! 2: American"Farm Bureau Federation National Leadership Conference, Sparks, NV. Contact Jonathan Shouse, VFBF corporate Feb. (1-12: Computer Classroom on Wheels Workshop, Smyth County. Contact Henry Snodgrass, Feb. 12: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly breakfast meeting, Holiday Inn Crossroads, Landowners can get help planting trees RICHMOND—Farmers and other landowners interested in reforesting or planting trees can apply for cost-share assistance through the Forestry Incentives Program. The FIP, offered through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, helps landowners plant and manage private forestlands. Throughout the 1999 fiscal year, the NRCS is offering continuous sign-ups for the FIP. Up to $340,000 is available to owners or operators of land planted in pines or hardwoods. "The money is to help landowners replant existing timberland, or to convert ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. > Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. # Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cvand@vafb.com. » Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be RECEIVED (not mailed) by the 10th of each month preceding the publication month. The September and October issues are combined, as well as the December and January issues. The deadline for the September/October issue is August 10 and the deadline for the December/January issue is November 10. I Repeat ads m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Feb. 6: Virginia Cow-Calf Management Course, Blackstone, Lynchburg and Orange. Contact john Hall. 540-231-9)53. Feb. 9-11: Price Risk Management Workshop, Bowling Green. Contact Mac Saphir, 804-633-6550. Feb. 10-12: American Farm Bureau Federation National Leadership Conference, Sparks, NV. Contact Jonathan Shouse, VFBF corporate secretary, 804-784-1381. Feb. 11-12: Computer Classroom on Wheels Workshop, Smyth County. Contact Henry Snodgrass, 540-676-6309. Feb. 12: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly breakfast meeting, Holiday Inn Crossroads, Landowners can get help planting trees RICHMOND—Farmers and other landowners interested in reforesting or planting trees can apply for cost-share assistance through the Forestry Incentives Program. The FIP, offered through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, helps landowners plant and manage private forestlands. Throughout the 1999 fiscal year, the NRCS is offering continuous sig...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ V personalized service can be as close as your own community. ' *> j u f Health Care Coverage O 1 Broad Range oi 9 jf y QU are unc j er a g e 55 — f or individuals or families H Coverage • if y OU are G ver age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. HESsZIS You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! Iltnail. AVAILABLE THROUGH FARM BUREAU FOR MEMBERS O...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau Volume 57, Number 2 Asian crisis hurting Va. poultry, timber exports By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —They're cooking less Virginia poultry and turning fewer of the state's oak logs into furniture in Asia. Virginia's poultry export trade has sustained a "bad" blow from the Asian financial crisis, said Robert Rich, director of international marketing for the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. In addition, the flu virus outbreak in the Hong Kong poultry industry and its link to human deaths caused many Asians to avoid buying poultry in January and February, Rich said. Poultry sales had already begun to decline in late October as the financial crisis took hold, said Patty May, director of communications for Rocco Enterprises Inc., which is based in Harrisonburg. "It will take months to recapture the market share we had previously." American agriculture is more than twice as reliant on foreign trade as our national economy as a whole, a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News Research center aids nursery industries Editor's note: This is the ninth in a continuing series about Virginia's 12 agricultural research and Extension centers. By LINDA McNATT Special to the Farm Bureau News VIRGINIA BEACH—Residents of the bustling resort city of Virginia Beach probably wouldn't have recognized their city around the turn of the century. Then, it was the thriving, rural farm community of Princess Anne County, and it was known best for growing vegetables. It was covered then by field after field of cucumbers, cabbage, spinach, tomatoes and potatoes. Local farmers moved their fresh vegetables by small boats to small nearby ports. From there, the produce was shipped north by barge to Washington, Philadelphia and New York. That's about the time when what is known today as the Hampton Roads Agricultural Research and Extension Center was born. Farmers were frustrated that the state had established a land grant college—Virginia Tech—so far away in Blacksbu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

March 1998 Alarms about beef, apples do irreversible harm Texas cattlemen's feud with Oprah Winfrey has fascinated a nation that loves celebrity news, especially when it's combined with courtroom drama. Morning disc Jockeys and late night TV hosts relish this kind of material, it's hard not to snicker. What about budget surplus? Many Americans find themselves at one time or another in dire financial straits. By extending or exceeding their credit limits, it takes years for many to recover. One of the true tests of a person's character comes when he or she has finally climbed out from under that mountain of debt. Once debt-free, do they learn from their mistakes and become more thrifty? Or do they return to their free-spending ways and end up back In a sea of red Ink? The federal government faces a similar choice. Thanks In large part to a sustained booming economy, the United States suddenly finds itself the caretaker of a $9.5 billion budget surplus for 1999. After 29 years of the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1998

Farm Bureau News Farmers fending off vultures By CHRISTY McKAY Special to the Farm Bureau News While livestock predators usually prowl on four paws, Central Virginia farmers are also fending off raiders from the sky. Al and Susan Epperly of Bedford County said they lost a 2-day-old calf last summer when black vultures dined on the calf. The black birds swooped down and quickly killed the calf by attacking the abdominal area. Its mother tried to fight them off, Mrs. Epperly said. But the birds pecked the cow's legs and nearly severed an udder. While most feathered species fly away at the sight of a human, these black vultures stood their ground when Mrs. Epperly approached them, she said. Campbell County Extension Agent Dick White and Amherst Extension Agent Bill Seay said black vultures and brown turkey vultures have been causing problems for farmers, but there are no statistics of losses. After an intensive search, Central Virginia bird expert Thelma Dalmas said she could find no d...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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