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Title: Cobram Courier Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20,149 items from Cobram Courier, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Horn of Plenty. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

The Horn of Plenty. This is tho title of an interesting article. in "Everyone's Magazine," giving facts concerning the making of gramophone records. In the course of tho article it. is stated ihht nowadays the usual price paid to an average good singer for each song is £8 to £10. Twenty-two yenrs ngo, in tho infancy of the bu siness, tho rate was only a couple of shillings a song. This was because at that time the process of repro ducing in great numbers tho com mercial records from the matrix re cord of copper had not been invent ed, fn the old days ten receiving horns were banked in front of the singer, and if lie or she had lea ther lungs ten .saleable records were produced. Now the use of the cop per matrix cheapens reproduction of the records, .so that the big prices to the fingers are possible. Many and various things, such as reputa tion, unusual ability or great popu lar demand, influence the rates at present. Theiv are no authen tic figures on what Caruso receives; but u ma...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Honesty Insured Here. BEHIND THE SCENES IN A FIDELITY GUARANTEE OFFICE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

Honesty Insured Here. BEHIND THE SCENES IN A FI DELITY GUARANTEE OFKIOB. People think that when a socicty guarantees, for a consideration, tC man's fidelity, it, at any rate, be lieves that honeaty is not ex tinct. Bear, doar ! As a fact, it ofton stands bond for somebody whom it would not trust alone with the potty ensh* And jt can well afford to do so because it gets an indemnity from the man's relatives. By some means a worthless rascal obtained a Poor Law appointment, and a certain •fiico guaranteed his honesty to the extent of £.">00. In loss than six months he bolted with over £400, which the insurers had to pay. Not a penny, how ever, did they lose. The runaway's unfortunate relatives reimbursed I the society in full. ! Contrary to popular belief, a so- j ciety nearly always insists thai a| warrant shall be taken out for an embezzler. This is dono, not in I the interests of justice—for who-1 ever knew a guarantee society ac- 1 tually prosecute ?—but for self-prw tection. T...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SIX LIVES SAVED BY RABBITS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

.SIX LIVES SAVKIVBY JtABBJTS. In tlio 'village of Xezignan, near Bordeaux, then* Jives a fuinily named ; CasteHol One night Oas* tcllo, his wife, and their four chil* drcn, wero sleeping soundiy on the first floor, when a fire broke out in the cottage. The man's children had a number of rabbits rind th'fr loud squeals awoke him. Thinking that there ware burglars in the house, Castello look his revolver and ran downstairs, to find that a candle, which lie had forgotten when he went to hod, had set lire to a curtain, and that the ground floor was blazing. Owing to the warning of the rabbits Castello was able to save his wife and family, and the rabbits themselves. A moment after he had done so, the roof fell in.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
German Streets. EXTRAORDINARY ORDERS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

German Streets. EXTRAORDINARY ORDERS. The German Government is deter mined that its city streets shall he cleai^ orderly and quiet. The pa ternal and absolute hierarchy has recently issued a ukase in t ho form of new regulations for the city of Berlin. The following nro some of the most striking provis ions : Women's dresses must bo short enough not to drag, and so raise tho dust or accumulate mud ; umbrellas and sticks must not be swung - or carried crosswise ; paper, remains of fruit, cigars and cigarettes must not be thrown into the street; persons must not walk more than three abreast, or stop on the pavement for any extended period ; there must be no whistling, singing, shrioking. shouting 'or loud talking of any kind : .windows must be closed when music is going on inside a building, and enrmen must not drive noipy loads of metal or. other, material through the streets.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
About Lord Strathcona. REMARKABLE INCIDENTS OF A WONDERFUL CAREER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

About Lord Strathcona. KBMAHKABU3 INCIDENTS Of A WONUKHFUL CAHBKIt. Lord Strnthcona's carcer is among the most remarkable in modern ltis' twiy. ,!"r" ot I10nl" parents, he rose to becomo an Kmpire-huililcr 0[ the lirst magnitude, and one of the nioRt remarkable and benevolent men „f the age. Creator of the American J'ncilic Hailway ; founder, during the South African War, of the famous regiment of liorse llmt bore his irnme : donor (it immense cost, with his relative, l^ord Mount Stephen, „f the Montreal Hospital, and of tho j.jft of half it million sterling to the Klnff'n Hospital Fund for Lou dun : he, in addition, dispensed numerous benefactions for medical Knd educational pur|)osca upon a scale "f munificence that is truly surjirisiiiK. A contemporary men linns eleven hospitals and educntionnj institutions which ho either founded in- honelitod Kith gifts amounting to i'MS.VHM). Hilt these nro only a N1 out of his many benevolences. Yet his modesty was as genuine ns his muniliccn...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SAVED FROM A WATERY GRAVE [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

SAVRfl FROM A WATERV CRAVE Captain Marshall once said that while at sea upon one occasion he saw' * v««ol in the distance flying n signal of distress. He bore flown upon it, nnd when he got near he found lhat it was a small schooner laden with wheal. Tht» water hnd #ot into tho bold, awl tljo.se on board knew that in n short time the swelling wheat would hurst the ves sel asunder, and nil would j*o to the bottom, unless somebody rescued them. This was dotie, and one by one the poor fellows laid hold lrpnn it and were rescued. They hud rn>t left the vessel more than a quarter of an hour before it split asunder «»d disappeared beneath the waves. A Professor, whose pupils made too much noise, lei the following* nni* veto slip out : "(lent lemeu, if every body he silent we shall be better able to discover who make* the row." This reminds ijs of n medical re port, which began thus : "There exists a great number o( families in Dublin who have died of cholera." The first tunnel in. Engl...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIA'S BIG SMOKE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

AUSTHAUA'S lilt; SMOKE. The Queensland tiovernmcnt tobac co expert Ktatc.s that Queensland Hliould he ahle to supply the whole of Australia's needs in the way of tobacco. Something like iifteen mil lion pounds of the "weed" arc used annually In Australia. The expert also regard** tobacco as the most profitable of small crops.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORLD-WIDE NOTES. NEWS FROM EVERYWHERE. VICTIMS OF A LEGEND. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

WORLD-WIDE NOTES. NEWS FROM EVERYWHERE. VICTIMS OP A LEGEND. An extraordinary story of buried i treasure has just reached France from ' the distant dependency of Tahiti. , Some while ago the Governor of Tahiti had occasion to leave the is land on a short cruise, which lasted 12 days or so. On his return he was greatly surprised to find that only one gendarme out of the total force of four was available for the main tenance of law and order. With some anxiety he inquired why. they had disappeared and learned to his amazement that they had been marooned on a desert island. The following is the extraordinary utory which he then unearthed : According to a story current in Tahiti, as the result of oppression in Peru some sixty or eighty years ago, a .number of Jesuit missionaries there decided to return to Europe, taking with them the various pre cious objects used in the services of the churches. The jewels were tAken from the ! settings and the gold melted down into ingots, and with th...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A SINKABLE AIRSHIP SHED FOR GERMANY. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

A SINKABLE AIRSHIP SHED FOR GERMANY. : Among the novelties to be inspect- j ed by the Kaiser at Heligoland is a 1 scheme for building a "sinkable" air- J ship shed for two naval Zeppelins. To save the shed from attack, a hole will be dug in the ground into which the shed. can be lowered by hydraulic power bo that the roof will be level with the ground and the en tire isfaed invisible from the sea.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Rabbit Trap. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

A Rabbit Trap. A good serviceable rabbit trap can be made by sinking a common dry goods box in tho ground to within Gin. of its top. A hole 6 or Tin. squaro is cut in oach end level with the earth's surface and boxes 1 din. long that will just fit are set in, hung on pivots, with the longest end outside, so they will lie hori zontal. A rabbit may now look through the two tubes, soys the American Threshennnn. Tho bait is hung on a string from the top of the large box so that it may be seen and smcllcd from the out side. Tho rabbit naturally goes J R^bbifwn the Trap into tho holes and in this trap there is nothing; to awnken his suspicion. He smells the bait, squeezes along pnst tho centre of the tube, when it tilts clown and the panic is shot into the pit, the tube righting itself at once for another catch. The top and sides of the large box may be covered with leaves, snow or any thing to hide it. A door placed in the top will enable the trapper to tako out' the animals. By placing ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
To Make a Camp Stool. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

To Make a Camp Stool, j The stool, as shown in Fig. 1, is inadu of beech or any suitable wood with a ennvns or carpet top. Pro vide four lengths for the logs, each lin. square and Iin. long.; two lengths, ljin. square and llin. long, for the top, and two lengths, Jin. square, one S£ and the other 10 J in. long, for tho lower rails. The legs are# shaped at the ends to fit into a S-in. hole bored in the top pieces as shown in Fig. 2, the distance between the centres of tho. holes being 7Jin. in one piece and Ojin. in the other. The lower rails arc fitted in the same way, using a '£-in. hole bored into each leg 2Jin. up •'rom-the lower end. Each pair of legs has a joint for boring* a hole in the middle of each leg, inserting «■ holt and riveting it over washers with a washer placed between the legs as shown in Fig. ij. The entire length of ^ench part j is rounded off for the sake of neat* | ness as well as lightness. About i yard of 11-in. wide inn- j terial . will *be required for the...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Dramas of Love and Revenge. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

Dramas of Love and Revenge. The modern girl whose Jove is spurned docs not by any means al ways let disappointment "food on her damnsk check;" she finds more solace in revenue than in I ears and sighs. And she is as ingenious in her vengeance as she is bold nnd remorseless in giving elTcct to it. When, for instance, a few months ago. n North Country lover de serted the girl who had worn his engagement ring for three years, to lay his disloyal heart at the feet of a Jadv whose moneybags com pensated for her lack of yonth and beauty, he could little foresee the price he would have to pay for his trcnehery. On \h<* morning of her wadding day a parcel was placed in the bride's hands, which, on be ing opened, revealed » handsomely hound volume, with the dedication, "To Mrs. , in gratitude for res cuing Alice M—— from her unhappy fate. "1'iK better to have loved and lost." I The oxplanntion of this strange de dication became painfully clear j when the l.ride-t o-be discovered t...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Secret Naval Code Book. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

Secret Naval Code Book. Few things aro so jealously guard ed ns tho secret code book of the United States Navy. It is u hook of signals—not the ordinary "wig wag" signals used in the daily di rection of the Meet by a command ing oflicer—but a code of signals to be used solely in time of war and in the presence of an enemy. These secret code books are issued only to the executive officers of a ship, who are enjoined to protect them against theft by every possi ble means. These books are threat-, ened not so much by the ordinary thief as by secret emissaries of other Governments who desire to ob tain knowledge of what the battle ships u'ould do in time of action. Governments have no scruples against thoft in such cases. The loss of one of these secret code books by an oflicer, unless ex plained to tho entire satisfaction of the Secretary of the ^nvy, would mean court-martial and probable expulsion from the service. To the honour of tho United States Ser vice, no oflicer has ever yet b...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
New Coaling Station. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

New Coaling; Station. In conncction with the* efforts to suppress the arms traffic in tho Persian Gulf, a coaling station has recently been established ot Hen jam, a. remarkable island, 5J by miles, occupying « ffood strategic position near the entrance of the fiulf. The island belongs to Persia, but her hold over it is of a very sha dowy nature. The Arabs who in habit, it pay no tribute to Persia, the only evidence of whoso sover eignty is « Customs post with n rickety flagstaff, which flies the Per sian flag once a week. The Indi Kuropean Telegraph Company's cabb* lands at Henjam. and the new coaling* depot has Jnyn formed near the telegraph station, which lies within the flritish concession. , The island is described as present ing: a dismal aspect—a mass of bar ren. broken, black rocks, streaked here and there with white and red strata. Cieologically it is as rich in interest and variety «s butnni cally it ifl poor.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How Bookmakers are "Had." CUTE DODGES WHICH MEAN MONEY. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

How Bookmakers are " Had." CUTE DODGES WHICH MEAN MONEY. Like the proverbial policeman's, the bookmaker's life is not a happy one. To keep within the strict limits of the law himself, and pre vent attempts at fraud on his bu siness, is a somewhat strange com bination, but that is what hun dreds of "bookies" are doing just now. From a chat I have had with one of the most prominent bookmakers, it appears there has boon within recent months a remarkable increase in attempts at fraud on the part of punters in connection with betting businesses. And how is it done ? "In innumerable w'ays," remarked the bookmaker. "I have been tho victim of many attempts, and what has struck me is the ingenuity dis played by some people. "A common dodge in the Post Of fice—nnd one for which several have been punished recently—is to ab stract a letter from circulation, in sert the names of winners, and then put the letter back again into cir» culation, the postmark, of course, showing that tho letter was p...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CITY PICKPOCKETS. THE CRIMINAL AT WORK. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

CITY PICKPOCKETS. ,4 THE CRIMINAL AT WORK. The hungriest thief in New York City (sny.s the "New York Herald") is the pickpockct. His greod is in satiable, and when he wedge* him self into a crowd and begins to gather in wallets, bank rolls, and the contents of women's carelessly carried handbags ho never quits un til he has grabbed almost every dol lar in sight. He will start to work in the early hours of the morning, and if not ap prehended he may still bo found busilly on the job when the after theatre crowds are surging into restaurants or crowding platforms of the '"subway or congregating at the various transfer points prepa- ' ratory to starting home. I In the eyes of the pickpocket a ! dollar is a dollar, and as the ma- I jority of them momentarily expect ' to be "collared" while plying their j trade they /Irmly believe in making hay while the sun shines, because they must lay by o certain sum for "fall money," a fund to defend them if arrested. IIOW A " MOll " WORKS. 'A feu* ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

HIGH CLASS TAILORS. BREECHES MAKERS, SHIRT AND BLOUSE MAKERS. HOSIERS, GLOVERS, Etc. Your Inspection RcKpeclfolly Invited when in the City. 260 COLLINS ST., MELBOURNE. 1 Ml tad Hi STRAW OR PANAMA HAT baaauso ha knous BL EMHO Renovates Cone FurnL ture and Basketware tun C<1. and 9d. piwVcij. cjuwjsts Aty <rzr.r*~ Andrew Carnegie built up hi* ccloscnl fortune by substituting raechfunenl power where animal power bail previously been used. He realized that fuel is far chrapcv /tan labour, and Applied that principle to his business with great, pumwnj. In tbcaa days of high wages, and in : thoeo days of higher wagas rot to conic, those farmers who follow Andrew's write ! Muunple will be tho*; wbo succccd best. No farmer who ploughs 'iOO a en* or mors per year can nfiord to uso tho ojfi method*, because ho can Bare money »ad bo more in dependent of labor by using a Tru-ticc Engine for the work, and if ambitious | enough can plough fcr Iiia neighbors bctdUo, and at a g...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Zuyder Sea. SCHEME TO DRAIN IT. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

The Zuyder Sea. SCHEME TO DRAIN' IT. The draining of the Inrgo bay in tile northern part of the Netherlands 1 know,, as the Zuydcr Sen, is now being discussed by thu States Gen eral, sn.vs "Engineering," and it looks as if the great work which was proposed sixty years ago would now he finally attacked. The idea was first seriously considered while the Haarlem Sen. or Swamps were being drained in tho years I 1810 to 1853. It took as much as thirteen years ' to complete that work, but it "soon repaid itself; and if the big Zuy der Sea should ho completely drained and the very low foreshores reclaim ed at the same time, the area of the kingdom of the Netherlands would be increased by one-seventh— i.e., by about 2000 square miles, at a total expenditure of something like £18,000,000. i If, as is contemplated. (,„,•( OI- tj,e' sea is to remain an inland lake, the' new Province of the Zuydcr .Sea will look somewhat as the country did in the days of the Ro mans. Tn that age there was in th...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
North-Country Yarn. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

North-Country Yarn. To the Northerner, only nil en feebled imagination turns- In..'dis may from the story of the family who, having lost their nearest rela tive, prepared to bury hhu with a due accompaniment of lamentations and baked meats. All whs pre pared, with the certain subdued fes tivity that marks such occasions in the North. Tho churchyard was some miles away, nncl it was agreed that the whole family, together with the cofiin, w'cre to be conveyed to the "burying" in a large hired bus. By degrees the. bus began to "play lead" in the imaginations of all concerned. It usurped the principal place in the coming drama, to the exclusion <V tho rightful plnyer of the part. When the eventful dav arrived . the family bestowed themselves within its recesses In splendid, if solemn, triumph. The vehicle moved awa.v, and had proceeded a little distance down the road when its progress was check ed . by the headlong pursuit of the family servant, waving, and calling incoherentl...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BOOMANOOMANA v. MUCKATAH. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 4 June 1914

-BoOMAyOOlTANA. W MtTCJCATAir. This match, which was played on : tho former's ground, was expected to provide a vary even contest, but tho gatne did not justify anticipations, for the visiting lluckatahites were always on top. . Both clubs had good men absent, jUuckatab being worst off in this respect, and tho play accordingly was not up to senior standard. 'l'he visitors, who had."the uso of a fairish wind which ultimately died away, put up two major aud two minor points before Booma. had a look in, and thou tho latter got strenuously to work aud hoisted three siugle9, aftor which Muckatah added another goal before the quarter bell rang. Tho next two quarters were more evenly contestoil, during which JIuckatah added 1.4 to Booma's 2 goals, but iu the final term the latter wore palpably "done," aud Muckatah had no trouble in adding 2.5 to nil. Tho final scores were— Muckatah 0.11, Boomanooraa>ia 2.3. In ground play the home team proved best, but they kuockod themselves about too ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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