ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 39,707 items from Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier And Fairfield And Wallangarra Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
39,707 results
ARRIVAL IN SYDNEY. SYDNEY, THURSDAY NIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

AEHIVAL IN SIDNEY. SYDNEY, THURSDAY NIGHT. Mr. Barton arrived in Sydney to-day at ! noon, and was accorded it splendid receo tion. Ho was driven to the Town Ball where his health was drank, and congratu latory speeches delivered. A great attendance is expected at to night's demonstration. Mr. Barton enys he will probably con teat a seat in thu House of Representa tives, but refuses to say anything with re gard to the controversy which has arisen ovor the seat of Government and resi dence of the Governor-General.

RETURN OF MR. E. BARTON. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

. ? RETURN 0? MR. E. BARTON. MR.-BARTON WM mot ut Bill unit on Tues day morning by thn members of tho Vic torian Ministry and others, whilst ho was welcomed at Melbourne by a largo number of representative citizens. Ho was ioudly cheered when ho stopped out of tho train at Spencer-streot plat form. He was driven to Manzios' Hotol, and subsequently held a .leveo in tho Assem bly Chambors, which was attended by nearly all Members of Parliament. Tho company, then adjourned to lunch, when a number of complimentary speechos woro delivered.' ?' Mr Barton was accorded a great recep tion.

A Broad Hint. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

A Broad Hint. . la early life a clergyman had met with an aeoident which left him with a broken nose-a deformity about which, in spite of MB passiveness,- he was known to be'a little sensitive. . One day a new inquirer propounded the old question: ' .How happened you to break your nose?' The minister answered, solemnly: 'To tell the truth, my friend, the aeoident was oausod through poking .my nose into other people's business T : Parker: ' A man doesn't have to die in battle to servo his country.' Collins: 'No; that is true... Some men could serve it just as well by dying quietly and peaceably at home.' ' -

GENERAL NEWS. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

GENERAL NEWS. The cost of St. Peter's, Rome, was over £1.1,000,000. In battle only one ball out of eiRlity five takes effect. The name Holland is an abbreviation of Hollowland. Afghanistan has a Tegular arm; of about 60,000 men. Of all the cardinals appointed by Pius IX. only four are now alivo. Sundays and holidays reduce the number of work days in Russia to 26S a year. Spiders are eaten by the Hottentots and New Caledonians with the utmost relish. Another of the periodical attempts to produce a universal language is contem plated in connection with the Paris Exposition. A piece of land in a street in the northern suburbs of Berlin which thirty years ago sold for about £480 cannot now be obtained under £150,000. Australasia is the largest producer of wool in the World, with ItuBsia second, the Argentine Bepublio third, and the United States fourth. A Northern Indian tribe embalm their dead, by means of honey, placing the bodica of those who die in radoly-ahaped troughs filled with ...

[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] MYSTERY OF A DIAMOND NECKLACE. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

fAti Rioirrs - RESKEVBD.] MYSTERY OF A DIAMOND NECKLACE. ,; It watapoB a bright, innny aftsrnsen in ^.'September that, an euteriug the station to "wbich I was atlaohed as a plainclothes man, I : ? .fcunil.my superintendent wailing to give mo iastaat orders for my attendaoQe opoa a Miaa Diunmoad, Park Villa, Ivy Lao*, Ialewoi*lr,, ,aDd tLitb«r I at once made raj way, aad, beiag favoured with an ioterview by the young lady . tenant, sbe, in much tribulation and in high - excitement, explained the circumstances iu ' connection with tbe loss of a valuable diamond necklace she had left la safety upon her . dressirg-table the night bafore. There was no - evidence of a burglary having been committed, .ad the present maidservants, the distressed .lady, informed me, bad beeu frith, bar far a . considerable period, and tbeir predtcssiors in the household bad left in a friendly way to be married to respectable working men, V You tell mo jeu placed your necklace apoa 'your dressing-table after ...

HOW TO DETECT A BAD HORSE. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

HOW TO DETECT A BAD HORSE. "Soundin the wind and limb" is a guarantee tliat horsodealers rattle of! easily-enough; but it is seldom so easy for amateurs to satisfy- themselves of tho truth of tho guarantee. To be sure, defeotivo wind is usually more readily detected than are defective limbs ; but there are certain signs that should be familiar to all who have to do with horses. Those that are apparent to the ' eye have to do with tho conformation of the animal. The nostrils "should bo large and well opened, prominent and sensitive. It used to be a custom in the dark ages, | when " cropped " ears and " docked " tails were considered to add to equine beauty, to slit the nostrils of horses, tho idea being that this process improved their wind. We have outgrown this particular bit of brhtal ignorance, and in time we may learn the absurdity of the hideous short tail. But a horse for fast work should have large, well-opened nostrils. Slitting thom when they are too small does no good, and...

PRINCESS MARGARET OF CONNAUGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

PRINCESS MARGARET OF CONHAUGHT. Rumour is busy as totho matrimonial prospeot of Princesa Margaret of Gonnaught, aud 1 f tho goesipa aro to bo believod aho is likely to oooupy a very high position by and-by. Her namo has,: already boon ooupled with that of the Czarevitch,- and it is said'that tho German Emperor," daring hk recent visit to England,-was BO .mnoh. charmed with hia handBOme, bright young cousin/that it is quite likelythat before very long we may hoar of her betrothal to tho heir of the German thronoV /^Aa 'the latter is a mere boy-not out of his^' teens V it eoems early days to talk of hlsmarriago, >but time will enow if tho gowipa aire'right'

MICROBES IN HOLY WATER. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

MICROBES IN HOLY WATER According to a recent issuaofthe "Philadelphia Medical Journal," Dr.Abba, a distinguished bacteriologist, has discovered miorobea ia holy wator ina.: number of, ohurohes in Turin, Italy. Dr.. Abbaox amiued thirty-one specimens taken from the fonts in different ohurohes.. Among the baoteria detooted, as alleged, wcrethe baoilli of diphtheria and tuberculosis. The oonolusions drawn by tha physician were that the fonts were a meana of distributing diBoase, The artlole abovo mentioned was shown to tbo Rev. Father J. NT; Connolly, Seoretaryto Arohbiflhop Co'rrigan. After reading it he said: "It- Boomsto mo that tho microbe theory ia being brought down to toofino a point.- In all my experience I , havo never known a case of a person being I 'mado ill by reason of using tho holy'water ' in fonts, The fonts are oleaned regularly, and.every precaution is taken." .;

TWO LETTERS FROM HER, [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

TWO LETTERS FROM HER, I Svrote hor a letter. , It took hor quite two . To answer it after sho's read it; Myletter contained what 'praps ovon you Have writton-at leaet you havo said it. My letter contained tho old talo of a heart .;;' . That longed to bo linked to another; And T told her to think on eaoh separate part, And ask the advioe of her mother. She apparently aid, for tho vory next post Brought mo a message of woe, For the letters that inademe turn pale as a. sheet Were tho simple and Bhort ones ' N' 10.*

GENERAL BADEN-POWELL. THE DEFENDER OF MAFEKING. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

GENERAL BADEN-POWELL. THE DEFEHDER OF MAFEKIHG. One day last summer a group of men were discussing the Transvaal difficulty in the Naval and Military Club. All agreed that war was extremely pro bable. . " Well," remarked one of the group, " if there is to be fighting, I only hope they will give me a warm corner." The speaker was Colonel R. S. S. 'Baden-Powell. The gallant officer's .hope has been fulfilled, for Mafeking, was a very warm corner indeed.,.. . There is much that is horrible about this waf, as there must be about all wars; -but.the.gallant and light-hearted 'defence of Mafeking supplies an incr dent almost humorous. ?: Colonel Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell was born in 1857,'and is the son of a clergyman. - He was educated at Charterhouse and joined the 13th Hussars in 1876.. .He served with that regiment in India, Afghanistan, and South Africa. During the operations in Zululand in 1888 he greatly distinguished himself, and was mentioned in despatches. 'Then he ^aw...

GEOFFREY'S WARD, Or, A Jealous Woman's Revenge. A Short Story. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

^V"S3bL03|wti Sitoa^r. ( T WISH to see Mr. Geoffrey f .. I Algernon.' i .' :: The well-trained man-servant expressed no surprise at the request, '. though he certainly did wonder, what such a foreign-looking midget wanted of his master. . .'A iady.to spe you, Mr. Algernon,' he announced, as he wrapped at the drawing-room door. \. The young lady followed him' and stepped inside. v ' To see me-Miss Algerori?' said a tall, angular woman, emphatically,' arising and looking rather severely 'at " the new-comer. . | No; Mr. Geoffrey Algernon,' was the caller's placid response1, as she - ..allied over to where a bright fire was burning in'the grate, and began to .warm herself in quite a composed, homelike manner. ' ' Then'. ask him to come here, James,' said the woman, looking over at her companion, a young lady of rather showy appearance, to see what she thought of. such an unheard-of -"'proceeding. ' :' The companion was trying to keep down "a 'well-bred giggle' at the poor little creatur...

BRITISH RIGHT TO SOUTH AFRICA. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

BRITISH RIGHT TO SOUTH AFRICA. Few educated persons, not in Great "Britain, but in the entire world, are aware, that we not only acquired our foothold in South Afrioa by right of victory, bnt also by- right of purchase. Perhaps not one in fifty, and yet some ninety years ago we handed over £6,000,000 in hard oash to Holland, for the Cape Settlements and Guiana. Not a trifling sum, considering that wo need not havo paid a halfpenny. As to the millions whioh we have laid out not only in proteoting Cape Colony aud Natal, but also the Transvaal, from Kaffir and Zulu invasions, that is another matter. When pro*B6er enthusiasts prato about the Boers fighting for "the independence of their native land," have they quiteforgotton. how.the followers of " Oom PaulM acquired thoir territory from the natives? If so, they should refer to history, wbioh is not quito ancient. ...

"LITTLE BOBS." [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

" LITTLE BOBS." "Little Bobs" ia beyond.all doubt the . moat, trusted soldier of the \Qqeen. The best General, said Napoleon,ia he who commits'1 tho fewest mistakes-meaning* thereby.that all must perpetrate some.. But 'Lord Roberts almost appears to be an exception to this rule. His career has been repeatedly associated with blunders; but they were the blunders of others whioh he was oalled upon to. repair. He has been the "dons ex machina" of Indian warfare. Prom Cabul to Candahar ho made his his toric maroh in order to re-capturo the guns whioh had been lost at iiaiwand in oonse quence of a disaster compared- with which our recent rovcrses in South Africa may, indeed, be regarded as o{ no account and he will equally recover- at Pretoria. the oannon whioh we lost at Colenso. But not only, is 4*BobB" the soldier's hero, ho' is also.the Soldior'd friend, who has donq no etid'of things for the private's welfare. "A Btziot disciplinarian, Lord Koberts is at the some timo as a tondor fa...

GENERAL KELLY-KENNY. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

GENERAL KELLY-KENNY. When Kimberley waa relieved, and Cronje mado hlB hurried retreat, General Ke)ly*Konny was sent in hot pursuit. The Biitish general is a fine soldier, und has done exoellent work in many parts of tho Empire. Ho waB born'in 1840, and entered tho Army as ensign in tho 22nd Foot in 1858. served in China in i860, Abyssinia in 1887*68, and since then in many parts of the world. In 1807 he was mado Major«General of tho Auxiliary Forces and Recruiting. This position ho held at tho outbreak of tho Doer Thero has been a romance of «orao kind about many soldiers. General Kolly-Kenuy's Army, ho, like many other subalterns, was exceedingly hard up. One nutumn ho was at Brighton, nnd when walking on tho front saw an elderly gentleman in a bath-ohair, who appeared to bo suffering from some sudden seizure. Tho young officer ran to his assistance, and in the ordinary course of events an. intimacy sprang up between the two. The old gentleman ultimately died, and left all his fort...

THE VALUE OF GIBRALTAR. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

THE VALUE OF GIBRALTAR. Gibraltar (about 1,000 miles from Eng land) is of immoHBC importanco an being tho great watch-tower from which the move ments of worships can be observed- and telegraphed as'they pass into nnd out of the Mediterranean Sea. Moreovor, situated as it is near the flank of our trade routes both to tho Oapo and to tbo West Indies uiid South Amerioa, it is tho point at which vessels would naturally call for news, orders, coal, and protootion during tho oontinuuuco of war. When you consider that in every second of timo twenty tons of shipping go out or come into our home ports, and that, as a matter of faot, the stream is continuous and never (leases, and that tho valao of tho sea borne trade of the British Empire is calcu lated at £030,000,000, of which, about £250,000,000 neither comes nor goes from the United Kingdom, it seemB difficult to exaggerate the value of tho fortress of Gibraltar or to realise tho congestion of British shipping which might eoek its pro te...

FLOWERS AS EMBLEMS. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

FLOWERS AS EMBLEMS. Tbeletaaia India is. emblematic of life; in ancieat h'gypt It was a death flower. . Tke moss ioiobud is in Peru considered as a symbol of tbo confession of lore. * Fli^Y aays. that tbo almond blossom was regarded by (bo young people of bis ago is at) emblrm of tape. Tlio myrtle plant ha* always been regarded as in emblem o5. lore. Amang tbo Greeks and Roman it was planted ia cctneterle*. t The box ia regarded as aymbolio jfctaaUncy. It is several times thus rUuded ta in the lighter 'English poems of the laat «?atury. The fern is. indicative o? fascination. In Saxony tbo pretest by a lover te Lis sneetheart of a bandful of ferae ia equivalent tj* a proposal, The-codar ia. as emblem of immortality, the symbol being sucttestrd by.ita evergreen foliage. It is .aaid to baro been ao regarded by tht Jaws a thouaand yeara before tbe Christian era. Among tbe pea^nts o ( Holland tbe gift of a straw between lovers is considered aa indicating a hepe of coacord finding a, bro...

HERE'S WHAT'S WANTED. A Citizen of Te[?]ntefielld supplies the Information. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

' HERE'S WHAT'S WANTED. ; A Citizen of T« nterficlil £upp]ios tho . InlWnmtiun. OvR'n half thii complaints 'of mankind originate with Hip kidney's: A slight tnuoh of Back-ache at fir.-t. Twinges mid shoot ing pains in the L'lins follow. Tliey must bo checked ;,'they' lead to graver compli cations. The sudorer seeks^ relief.. Plas ters are tried nnll LininicptB for the Buck. So-called Kidney Cures which do not euro. The long-looked for results seems unat tainable. If you Ruffur do you want relief 1 Follow the plan adopted by this Tenterfield citizen. MR W. H. UNDER WOOD, Bricknmker, Rouse-street, who Bays " Working at my trade gave me a nasty Back-ache wliioh wbb a great trouble to mo. When I wanted to pick up a barrow I would have to bend my Knees to net down, keeping my Back straight. I used DOAN'S BACKACHE KIDNEY PILLS for this trouble and am now able to stato that tlif y are a splendid remedy, for Buclmche. Tliey were recommended to mo some time aso nnd I procured a box at Cavano...

A SCOTCHMAN'S QUEER WILL. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

A SCOTCHMAN'S QUEER WILL. ID his .iatereatisg book* u Uoolaimed Meney," Mr, S. H. Preston qaotes the will of a worthy Scot, Dr. Duotop, ia which it waa sob oat *. I leave the property of-Oairbread and ail* property I nay. bo possessed of to'mT sisters ~-and-^ j, tho - former becttue aho ia mar tied to a ministe^' whom-may Godb»lp birn -she hobp«ck»,'thejlatter beoanie she is mar tied to nobody ; oor is likoly to beft.for the ia an old maia, and nat maxket ripe. *. I leave my silver . tankard to the eldest son of old Jobo, as the representative of tbo family. I would have left it to old Jobs him self, but bo would have melted it down to mako temperance medals, and that woaid have been a saorilege. However, I leave him my big born souff-box, he. can eoly mako temper ance horn spoons out of that. ... I leave my brother-in-law Allan my punch-boul, aa he is a big, gaaoby man, andiikely to do oredit to it. . "I leave to Parson Oheraaslo my big silver snuff-box as a small token of gratitud...

Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

THE -LITERARY TREASURES "Not merely a work of iefen*nce. lube consulted u h* 11 Konin (]u(rbtion or doubt uritev hut a read* itiglibrary of the choic est character-on»» that every man of unltum covets as 11 fireside1 com panion iu his owu home." .. Now t*at, under the special nTrnngemout made by the London TIMES, the ENCY CLOPEDIA BRITANNICA has been brought comfortably within the m*ans of tho New : South Wale8 public', there will be few nmon£ those who take pride in the possession of a general ^library who will longer remain without this monumental publication. It i'b characteristic, but it is none the leBB, remarkable, that some of tho finest and most faultless work oi onr contemporary writers has been done for the ENCYCLOPAEDIA. Following the tradition i;f Lord Macaulay, of a generation ago-though the tradition was really eothbliehcd long before-the foremont of Englishmen of 'otters, like tho most eminent English mm of science, have contributed, from tjie store of their knowledge...

AN ACCOMMODATING NEIGHBOUR. [Newspaper Article] — The Tenterfield Intercolonial Courier and Fairfield and Wallangarra Advocate — 17 August 1900

AN ACCOMMODATING NEIGHBOUR. A very characteristic story ? of men who run to brains is told of the Re?. Philip D. Sbbaff, who .about thirly years ago was preaching in Meraesburg, Pa. The reverend doctor up to that time had sever been married, nor had he kept boose. By the charms of one of the slaters of his flock, he wu persaadedtc de the former, and, as it matter of coarse, the latter followed. He and his wife had aot been lonfe domiciled when the perplexing question arose how to get rid of the kitchen refuse. ' The dsotor was advised by a neighbour to buy a email pig, and the advice was accom* panied. by.an offer to soil him one. Accordingly the pig was puiobased, ^and 'immediately another problem oame up* to be solved-viz, how to get a pen for it. Casting about, the dootor discovered a large dry«goods box in whioh some of his household ( foots had been reoeivad. He set to work with saw and bam» msr, and with pieces of boards from the box be soon constructed a pin, which was only a...

x
Loading...
x
x