ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Indian Advocate, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
4,460 results
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

383 The Indian Advocate. of time and money; that schools under the jurisdiction of the Oklahoma government be established among those Indians so that the latter cannot come into constant contact with white children, and that payments by the government from their trust funds now in the United States treasury, be used to en able them to start in farming and stock raising. , o o a Contentment. Lovely, lasting peace of mind! Sweet delight of human kind! Heav'nly born, and bred on high, To crown the fav'rites of the sky, With more of happiness below, Than victories in a triumph know, Whither, Oh whither art thou fled, To lay thy meek, contented head? What happy region dost thou please To make the seat of calm and ease? 'Twas thus, as under shade I stood, I sang my wishes to the wood, And lost in thought, no more perceiv'd The branches whisper as they wav'd: It seem'd as all the quiet place Confess'd the presence of the grace; When thus she spoke " Go rule thy will, Bid thy wild passions ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 384 A Great Mistake of Parents. I have been a close observer of parents vho send their children to non-Catholic schools, especially parents who send their sons to non-Catholic colleges. 1 have found their mo tive to be usually the notion, that their sons will make ad vantageous worldly associations at such colleges, but I have noticed that the sons themselves have something to do with it; they generally persuade their parents, who are weak enough to be so influenced, that everything is so much better, nicer and respectable at non-Catholic colleges. The truth is, these sons want to go to non-Catholic colleges, because they will be free there from the restraints of discipline, which they are sure to find in Catholic colleges. It w.as only the other day .that a young fellow, a Catholic going to anon-Catholic insti tution, said to me in the course of conversation that when " a fellow gets to be seventeen or eighteen it is time to give him the 'freedom of the town'."...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 35 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

U" ' ' "" nuwpm 385 The Indian Advocate. Local Paragraphs Rev. Father Nolan, of Gainesville, Tex., paid us a neighborly visit. Very Rev. Prior Leo made a two weeks' trip to Mexico and adjacent country. RR. FF. Hilary, Constantine, Hippolyte, Ildephonse, William, Stan islaus were present at the annual Retreat. Brother Francis Xavier pronounced his triennal vows, November 13th. The Brother hails from Kansas. Architect John L. Quinn, of Dallas, Tex., spent ten days in the Ab bey retouching the plans for our new church and college. Rev. Fathers Gratian and Justin are at the Abbey, resting up; but as we have so many calls for priests their stay will be short. Rev. Fr. Aloysius Hitta left the Abbey for Fort Smith, Ark., where he is to stayfor some time assisting the Rev. Rector of St. Boniface, church. Rev. Father Norbert, one of the pioneers of the Mission, returned to the Abbey after a twelve years' sojourn in France, The Advocate ex tends a hearty welcome to his Reverence. Ven. Profess...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

Vol. XV. f The Indian Advocate JANUARY, 1903. The New Year. Ring out wild bells to the wild sky The flying cloud, the frosty light: The year is dying in the night Ring out wild bells, and let him die. Ring out the old, ring in the new; Ring, happy bells, across the snow; The year is going, let him go Ring out the false, ring in the true. Ring out the grief that saps the mind, For those that here we see no more; Ring out the feud of rich and poor Ring in redress to all mankind. Ring out false pride in place and blood, Tha civic slanderand the spite; Ring in the love of truth and right Ring in the common love of good. Ring out all shapes of foul disease; Ring out the narrowing lust of gold; Ring out the thousand wars of old "Ring in the thousand years of peace. Ring in the valiant man and free, The larger heart, the kindlier hand; Ring out the darkness of the land, Ring in the Christ that is to be. No. I

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. Rev, H, G, Ganss' Address at the Catholic Feck j eratinn in Chicago. August 1902. R. President and Gentlemen of the Federation; It strikes me that no gathering of American M Catholics assembled in deliberate session would reflect the reoresentat i ve character of the Church, the enlightening spirit of its members, and the sacred traditions of its past, without in including the most historic and pathetic element of our Republic. I refer to the real, true and, in the literal acceptation of the word, the origi nal American the Indian. The Indian question has at all times been a most vexatious one; has been a problem full of perplexities. It has been one, although it enlisted the most consummate statesmanship, the highest judicial opinions of the nation, the most lavish expenditure of philanthropic endeavor, and, again, the whole United States army, it has not even at this day been solved. It has baffled all solution. My province in speaking to you today is, not to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. I say the problem is a most perplexing one. It involves points which we cannot discuss today, especially that of the comparative merits of Anglo-Saxon and Latin civilization. Both may be briefly summarized, that the one, the Anglo Saxon civilization, appears to be always that of extermina tion, whilst the Latin civilization is that of amalgamation. In our neighboring Republic of Mexico we have seven millions of Indians who enjoy all the privileges and all the prerogatives of a full and plenary citizenship. The highest offices -in the State are eligible to the Indians; so that at the present day we have a President of the Republic who is proud of and boasts of the strain of Indian blood that courses in his veins. In the Episcopate we likewise have splendid examples of the possibilities of the Indian when lifted up spiritually on the higher plane of true Catholic civilization. In our Republic here we have, at the present day, 270,000 Indians, the last remnant of a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. United States Government in dealing with the Indians had been a policy of -'outrage, of spoilation, and of murder." On the other hand, we have the government making every effort, in its own way, to lift up the Indian to civilization. It spent $240,000,000 in the last thirty-three years to educate and to civilize him. At the present time it spends $3,000,000 each year to bring him up into citizenship. But what was our policy during the past? You remem ber, gentlemen, that General Grant summoned the different representatives of churches to Washington to inaugurate a new policy. The, old policy had been the policy of the force of arms. We had to fight the Indian inch by inch. And be it said to the eternal credit of the Indian, and in it he re veals himself to us, the exponent of the highest-and the loft iest manhood, he would never yield unless he cemented every inch of ground by his blood. He knew he was the owner of the land by God-given title, and in his own min...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. men, as any two right-minded men can enter upon. He told them: "You go out West, build your schools, equip them; send there your teachers, and I pledge the word of the United States Government that we will support those schools; that we will give you a pro rata payment for each child you edu cate." On the strength of that promise we went out West. We erected our schools. We sent there our most zealous men and our most devoted workers and consecrated nuns. The results of that work, gentlemen, are apparent in the records of the nation, and especially in the reports of the Commis sioners of Indian Affairs. The work progressed successfully and triumphantly. Our success, gentlemen, was our crime. When other denomina tions saw that they could not compete with Catholic zeal and where can competition enter with Catholic endeavor, where we have the monk and the friar and the priest vowed to a life of celibacy, vowed to a life of poverty, vowed to a life of self denial an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

Thi: Indian Advocate. ceive Catholic teaching saw how he flocked to the Catholic schools. They saw the reverential awe with which he looked up to the black gown. They saw likewise the docility with which he listened to the meek and tender voice of the nuns, and therefore they intruded themselves into Congress, and there they clamored that the appropriation given to the schools should be withdrawn. And, be it said to the eternal shame of the American Congress, and we must hang our heads in mortification when we do say it, in a moment of weakness, vacillation and alarm, panic-stricken and terrorized, yielding to the pressure, they revoked the appropriation given to our Catholic schools. We found ourselves, gentlemen, in a most awkward pre dicament, a most perplexing situation, and a crucial moment in the history ol the Catholic Church in the United States. What was to be done? How was it to be done? In that moment, gentlemen, when counsel was dear, when help was not in sight, there st...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. $230,000; in another year $140,000; in fact, the amount is never looked after. Every year she is willing to make good the shortage to keep those schools wielding the influences of Catholic civilization and Catholic religion. (Applause.) You may claim, perhaps, that we have an annual collec tion for the Negro and Indian missions. We have, gentle men, and we have little reason to feel proud of it. In the United States, with a membership of twelve millions of Cath olics, our annual contributions for the Negro and Indian mis- m nnjna aiuuuuia iu puu,uuu, ij.ctii Ul liili gues iu tut iicgiu and half to the Indian. The Methodist Church alone in this country raises $89,000 for the perversion of our Bohemian, our Italian, our Polish, our Slav and foreign population $89,000 a year it raises for this specific purpose! And here is f the large body of the Catholic Church, outnumbering any other I M two denominations, and in zeal outstripping them all, giving only $80,000! T...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. the President has not done more for the Catholics, it is be cause we have not presented our claims to him in the proper light and under proper auspices. (Applause.) Out of the two hundred and seventy thousand Indians, J one hundred and six thousand are Catholics, and I hope, by the grace of God, as your society grows, that when you have your next annual meeting I will have a full-blooded Indian here to plead his cause as .a memer of the Federation. (Ap plause.) o o o The Working" Boy. A Benedictine Legend. "By virtue of this wonderful obedience St. Maurus performed the mir acle of rescuing St. Placidus from a watery grave." "O suffer the children to come unto Me And forbid them not!" He said; "For of such will My Heavenly Kingdom be, By such it is merited. Unless ye become like unto these Ye shall not have part with me:" As little ones crowded about His knees He caressed them tenderly. In every age great souls have heard This truth of the gentle Christ, Have tre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. To virtue's heroic height. Their law his slightest expressed command, His yoke like the Master's light. Placidus 'mongst the brethren came To gain his spirit's weal; Noble of birth and untarnished name With earth's lowliest to kneel At the Saviour's feet, in charity Only one boon to ask The grace to. toil in humility, His the most menial task. To draw the water, to hew the wood, Servant of servants he; What matter? He toiled for the common good And wrought his own sanctity. One day, while bending o'er waters' brim, With pitcher to fill held low, He fell in the depths, the twilight dim Witnessed, alone, his woe. Maurus knelt in the cloister choir Absorbed in-fervent prayer, His spirit uplifted with love's desire Unmindful of mundane care. "Placidus needs thee! Quickly, run! From a treacherous, unblessed grave, By holy obedience, my son, I call upon the to save." "The Lord Christ speaketh by the voice Of Benedict, today; My vow is binding, mine no choice But simpl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

io Thk Indian Advocate. "Thrice blessed and happy they Who, leaving all Christ's love to gain, Learn humbly to obey." The Working Hoy. o d o An honest man is the noblest work of God. An infallible truth: "How can one become a fluent con- y J, versationalist?" "The best way is to be born a woman." r The parent, not the State, is responsible to God for the training of the child. Henc-the obligation is a religious, not a civic one. Be not in haste to call a stranger friend. "You must eat a bushel of salt with any one," said wise old Plutarch, "before you can really become attached to him " .. A Boston preacher insists that one great fault of the American people is that they talk too much. He is right Soon everybody abroad will think we are all Boston preachers. A parish priest once shrewdly remarked: "When I look at the well-dressed congregation, I say to myself: Where are the poor? When I count the offerings I ask: Where are the rich?" Sentiment is a strong man's concealment of what h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. ii : (j, The Indian in the Nineteenth Century, J2& CHARLES MORRIS. LL. D. HE relation of the American people to the Indians, since the first settlement of this country, has Tbeen one of conflict, which has been almost in r.psfia.nt in snmp Qrfirmc nf tVio lon Rv frho opening of the Nineteenth century the red man had been driven back in great measure from the thirteen original states, but the tribes in the west were still frequently hostile, and stood sternlv in the wav of our oroerress westward. We Gsg propose in this chapter to describe the various relations, both peaceful and warlike, which have existed between the whites and the red men during the cent ury with which we are here concerned. The close of the Revolutionary war brought only a par tial cessation of the Indian warfare. The red man was by no means disposed to give up his country without a struggle, and throughout the interior, in what is now Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin, and along the Ohio r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

12 Thk Indian Advocate. great success. While he was seeking to draw the Southern Indians into his scheme, his brother rashly joined battle with General Harrison, and was utterly defeated in the fight which gained for Harrison the title of Old Tippecanoe. Disap pointed and disheartened at this destruction of his lifework, Tecum seh threw all his great influence on the British side in the war of 1812, in which he dealt much destruction to the United States troops. At Sandusky and Detroit and Chi cago, and at other less important forts, the Indian power was severely felt; but at Terre Haute the young captain, Zach ary Taylor, met the savages with such courage and readiness of resources that they were finally repulsed. But rarely did a similar good fortune befall our troops: and it was not until after Commodore Perry won victory for us at Lake Erie, that Tecumseh himself was killed, and the twenty-five hundred Indians of his force were finally scattered, in the great fight of the Thames...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. 13 Philip Schuyler, Patrick Henry and Benjamin Franklin. As early as 1832 the young nation found itself confronted with a serious Indian problem, created a separate bureau for the charge of the red men, and inaugurated a definite policy of treatment. Speaking in general, we have altered this policy three times. As a matter of fact, we have altered its details, changed its plans, and adopted new methods of management as often as changing administrations have changed the ad ministrators of our Indian affairs. But in the large, there have been three great steps in our Indian policy, and these have to some extent grown out of our changing conditions. The first plan was that of the reservations. Under that sys tem, as the Indian land was wanted by the white population, the red man was removed across the Mississippi and pushed step by step still further west; and as time went on and the population followed hard after, he was eventually confined to designated tracts. Y...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

H Thk Indian Advocate. they ceded their lands to the government, and took in ex change the country now known as the Indian Territory. They were already somewhat advanced in civilization, with leaders combining in blood and brain the Indian astuteness and the white man's experience and education. John Ross, a half breed chief of the Cherokees, of unusual ability, brought about the removal under conditions more favorable than of ten occurred. He was bitterly opposed by full half the In dians, and it was not without sufferings, and losses of more than one kind that the great southern league was removed to the fair and fertile land set aside for them in the far-off West. It was owing to the sagacity of John Ross and his associates that this land was secured to them, in a way in which no other land has ever been secured to an Indian tribe. They hold it today by patent, as secure in the sight of the law as an old Dutch manor house or a Virginia plantation, and all the learning of the high...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocatk. 15 and although Keokuk and one band went peacefully to their new home among the Iowas, Black Hawk and his followers were slow to depart, and were removed by force. The Indian Department failed to furnish corn enough for the new settle ment, and, going to seek it among the Winnebagoes, the In dians came into collision with the government. Thereafter ensued a series of misunderstandings, and consequent fights, resulting in great alarm among the whites and destruction to the Indians. The story is the same story, almost to details, that has been frequently seen since that time. After the fashion above described all the removals have proceeded, the cause ever the same, the white man's greed and the ferocity of the wronged and infuriated savage. It is useless and impossible to give the details of all the various tribes that have been pushed about in the manner de scribed. In 1830 the East was already crowding toward the West, and every succeeding decade saw the fronti...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

16 The Indian Advocate. more and more treacherous and constantly more cruel. The white settler was daily in greater danger, and constantly more eager for revenge. A new complication entered into the problem. The game was fast disappearing, and with it the subsistence of the Indian. It became necessary for the government to furnish rations and clothes, lest he should starve and freeze. Cheat ing was the rule and deception the every-day experience of these savages. In 1795 General Wayne gained the nickname of General Tomorrow, so slow was the government to fulfill his promises; and thus for more than a hundred years it was tomorrow for the Indian. Exasperated beyond endurance, he was ever ready to retaliate, and the horrors of an Indian war constantly hung over the pioneer. During all this period we treated the Indian tribes as if they were foreign nations, and made solemn treaties with them, agreeing to furnish them rations or marking the reservation bounds. We have made more than a ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1903

The Indian Advocate. 17 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE I Published by the Benedictine Fathers of j SACRED HEART MISSION, OKLAHOMA. ! - A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. TKRMS OP HDnSORIPTIONl Single Copies 1 5c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart. Oklahoma. imrviLEOissi 1. Eery Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Eery year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living and one for the Dead...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
x
Loading...
x
x