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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

6 WHY MAKE IT A FRAUD? The readers of Ranch and Ranue have heard something of the process butter that is being introduced into the markets of the Pacific Coast. The in cident related below shows that the way of the transgressor is sometimes a hard one, but those who are acquaint ed with Colonel Kaupisch, of Portland, will not be surprised at the outcome of the incident. The colonel is a German, a very pat riotic one, and a fine representative of the typical Tueton. In addition to be ing an astute business man, he likes to have a little fun once in a while. Not long ago he was busy in his office on Washington street, in Portland, when the agent of the Chicago process factory, who has been introducing pro cess butter on the Coast, came into his office and wanted to sell him a carload of butter. The colonel is very fond of playing ignorant; he receives his vis itor kindly and is offered a carload of pure creamery butter, guaranteed to be a fine quality, at several cents below the marke...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

The duty of its enforcement rests upon Dairy Commissioner McDonald, who has given notice to all wholesalers and retailers that prosecutions will be made in all cases where adulterated goods are received after May 1. As an instance of the value of this law, if the food commissioner's rulings are sustained, it is said one wholesale firm received in Seattle last week a full car of jellies from the east, in which there is probably no pure frut jelly, but is manufactured from substi tutes, colored and flavored to resemble the real article. |T Practically all of the cider and vine gar sold in this state is adulterated. If pure cider and cider vinegar takes its place it will open the field for estab lishing factories to manufacture same from the fruits of this state. All spices, baking powders, syrups, etc., must not contain adulterants without having their proportions branded on each package. The merchants of Spokane have or ganized and pledged themselves to sup port the laW. The dealers ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

8 Ranch and Range With which is consolidated THE WASHINGTON FARMER, THE PACIFIC COAST DAIHYMAN, THE FARMER AND TURFMAN. Official Organ of Washington State Dairymen's Association. Washington State Livestock Breeders' Association. Freeman & Freeman, Publishers. Under the editorial and business management of MILLER FREEMAN. Traveling Representative and Correspui'dent, LEOH R. FREEMAN. Editorial Offices, • • Seattle, Wash. Telephone Brown 1011. Long distance connection BUSINESS OFFICES Seattle, ... 816-316 Pioneer Building. Spokane, • Suite F Hypotheekbank Building. Subscription in advance, $1.00 -er year. Address all communications to KANCIi AND RANUE, 315-816 Pioneer Building, Seattle, Wash. THE STORY OF AN AD. Want "Ads" make dry reading as a rule, but we reproduce one here just to have the opportunity of tracing its re sults. In December Mr. William J. Watkins sent the following notice to this journal, which was duly pub lished: WANTED — A man to look after a ranch in Snohomish ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

FEEDING THE LAYING HENS. . Wat to feed, and how to feed it, pre sents an interesting topic for the con sideration of the practical poultry man, who desires his fowls to be a source of profit instead of an incum brance. I recently inspected a poultry plant where the fowls were fed in a machine like method. The regular bill of fare was bran mash in the morning, and wheat at night, day after day. Out side of a little chopped vegetable mix ed in the mash no variety was given. [ The birds not having free range, no green stuff or animal food could be se cured by them. The result was un avoidably a short and almost entirely negative egg production. The remedy, adopted on my suggestion, was to sub stitute for the bran mash a chop feed, composed in about equal parts of ground corn, wheat, oats, barley and middlings. This was to be fed early in the morn ing after being mixed with boiing wat er, giving about half what the birds would eat up clean. Then, between nine and ten o'clock of the fore...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

id STORING ROOTS. Editob Ranch and Range: In reply to the request of W. H. Paulhamus for my plan for a root house I would say: I have tried various methods in pro tecting my roots and I have not found any plan equal to that of storing them in the barn where they are to be fed out. I select a place easily accessible to the mangers and for 25 cows I en close a place 15x20x8 feet. This is done when the barn is empty, so that when the hay is put in it furnishes am ple protection from frosts for at least two sides and the top. Then double boarding the remaining two sides will secure the roots from our coldest weather. A few inches of open space beneath an open floor I nd furnishes all needed ventilation to save the roots from any damage from overheating. The advantages of this plan I find to be its trifling cost, and the great sav ing of labor in the handling of the large quantity of roots that are, or that ought to be grown for the stock. Since I have found it to be more profitable to f...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

FINE SHORTHORN HERD. Three miles west of Corvallis, Ore., is the Oak Creek Farm of John M. Os burn, where he has some of the best Shorthorn cattle to be found on the coast. At the head of the herd is Medler 123532, out of imported Lord Nonpareil used by Cruickshank on his world-renowned herd. Medler's mother is Touch-me-not, out of Gay Monarch, that took the first premium at the Chi cago world's fair. Mr. Osburn has 18 cows and 25 calves of the Butterflies, ; Bates and Rose of Sharon families. He recently sold to Charles B. Ladd four bulls and two heifers; to the agri cultural college, one heifer; to Burk hart, Brownsville, one bull; to Stump, Monmouth, one bull; and he is about to bring out from the east a $500 bull calf. The Albany, Ore., Democrat says Mr. Bates has a new incubator, but he will have to get a rustle on to beat a couple of women across the river. Recently one of their hens which was setting on 13 eggs deserted the nest and the eggs became cold. The women took them, ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

12 MARKET BEPORT. Butter went down with a clap 3c Wednesday, being sold at 23c. This makes the paying price 20@21^c. Potatoes are weaker this week, the price showing a downward tendency. They are coming in more plentifully. Good apples show a distinct advance over last week. The first strawberries of the season from Caliiornia have been placed on sale in Seattle by J. W. Godwin & Co. They sell at 40c per box. JOBBING PRICES. Potatoes —White river potatoes, $30 @35; east-of-the-mountains, $35@37.50. Apples — Wenatchee Ben Davis, $2.00; Winesap, $1.50@1.75; Hood River Spitzenbergs, $1.50@2.25; Bald win, $1.75; Puget Sound apples, 60c@ $1.25. Hot house lettuce, 40@45c; onions, silverskins, $12@17; kiln dried onions, $20@23 per ton; cabbage, 2^c per pound for native; parsnips, 75@85c per sack. Cauliflower, 90c@$l per doz; tur nips, 50@75c per sack; carrots, 50®60c per sack; beets, $1 per sack; cranber ries, $7 per bbl. Hides, Pelts and Wool —Heavy salt ed steers, over 60 lbs, 8c: me...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

COGSWELL'S BED POLLS. L. K. Cogswell exhibited at the Ore gon State Fair of 1888: Milkmaid and Dairymaid, two three-quarter blood Red Polled yearling heifers, out of his $500 bull Wisconsin's Duke, from dams out of Bouncer, the first Red Polled bull that ever came west of New York, and out of one of the first registered cows imported, the cele brated cow Ocean Maid 401, whose cut Mr. Cogswell uses largely, as he has so many of her descendants. The two heifers were raised on J([ares for him until one year old, in the Boisfort hills, then pastured by A. L. Davis on leased school land and shipped from the brush direct to Salem fair, where they took first and second premiums as the best grade heifers in Oregon, and attracted the attention of every lover of fine, gentle, hardy cattle that saw them. Several parties were anxious to buy and Mr. John Blurock, of Vancouver, Wash., as soon as he saw them and before the fair was half over, paid $275 cash for them, remark ing that he was not buy...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

14 E? ADIV /f I""? DC2 f SEND us YOUR I^AreiVlOre^ * Butter, Eggs, Potatoes and Hay Quick Sales and Quick Returns. No charge for Storage. TASCHEREAU & HAMILTON 161-163 S. Lincoln St., Spokane, Wash. Telephone 427 SUNSET NURSERY COMPANY COUPEVII/.E-ON-THE-SOUND, WASHINGTON. OFFER HIGH GRADE Northern grown fruit and ornamental trees. THE WOOD of their trees is fine grained and tough. All trees sent out are st alky in form. Each tree is grown on 480 square inches of ground. THEIR ROSES of over ICO VARIETIES have been thoroughly tested and se lected from over 1800 sorts. Their collection represents the very cream of aristocracy in the rose world. Rose stock one and two years old, all fie Id grown. SUNSET NURSERY COMPANY, COUPEVILLE-ON-THE-SOUND, WASHINGTON. OLD RELIABLE SAFE B. Presley & Co. ■ ■ Leading Fruit Receivers Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants. Shipments Solicited from Northwest Fruitgrowers. CEkUMMud 1840) ST. PAUL, MINN. Winter Apples Wanted POTATOES, ONIONS,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

SWEET PEAS—Very choice named varieties, delicate colors, hand picked, home grown seed. Packets 5c each, 8 for 25c, 84 varieties separate packets $1. A choice hand-mixed lot, over 20 varieties, 10c. A good, promiscuous mixture for sc. MRS. L. A. NELSON, Getchell, Wash. ABC OF BEE CULTURE—The best book on care of bees ever written. Price $1.25. Ad dress RANCH AND RANGE, Seattle. ELMWOOD A. J. C. C. JERSEYS—Me Combination 39061, a grandson of Brown Bessie 74998, champion cow of the Columbian Dairy Test at Chicago, at the head of the herd; 411.5 pounds of butter and 6323 pounds of milk aver age per cow in 12 months. A few bull calves for sale from choice cows, also a few grade Jer sey .heifers. ADAM M. STEVENS, Prop., Box 247,*Ellensburg, Wash. WlNE—Experiment Station Herd of Berkshire and Poland China of choicest breeding. The blood of such famous herds as those of A. J. Loyejoy & Sons, Roscoe, 111.; N. 11. Gentry, Se dalia, Mo.- John Harcourt & Co., New Augusta, Ind., in the h...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 April 1899

i 6 """"*■' - encourages us all. The most successful man is the one who uses the most advantageously the ] means provided in his especial line. In other words, a successful man will promote his success by the use of machinery that has proved successful. i The Disbrow Is the most successful creamerymachine of recent years. You should be posted in regard to it.Tou should see that it is a part of your creamery equipment. It churns exhaustively. Ie works thoroughly. Booklet giv ing full description sent on application. IDEAL SKIM MILK WEIGHERS, ELGIN STYLE ASH TUBS, SPRUCE AUSTRALIAN BUTTER BOXES, IDEAL TURBINE TESTERS, STEARNS STYLE SPRUCE TUBS, IDEAL CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE TABLETS, REFRIGERATING MACHINERY, IDEAL CLEANSING POWDER, ETC. COLUMBIA IMPLEMENT COMPANY, Portland, Ore., Selling Agents. Creamery Package MTg Co., > i, 3 and 5 W. Washington Street, CHICAGO, ILL.. BRANCH HOUSES: Kansas City, Mo. Minneapolis, Minn. Waterloo, lowa. Omaha, Neb. GOOD SEEDS AT FAIR PRICES. FARMERS, buy...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

I Colic** of WashtettMi. Mnch And mange Jf^ -ill ISSUED EVERY WEEK *%r Vol. IS, No. 20 I A SHARP ADVANCE 1 On Tinware will within a short time affect the prices of Milk Cans, Milk, Cream and Cheese Vats, Weigh Cans, etc. ;>£ Glassware, Woodenware and other wares are also advancing. We have not yet reached a point where our prices |2| have advanced, hut from correspondence recently received from the manufacturers of the various lines which we ...^ handle, we anticipate having to do so soon, in line with all other Supply Houses. We notify all, therefore, to order '-^ their requirements as soon as possible. Iron pipe has advanced over 25 per cent; some lines are advanced from 40 ' „;, „ per cent to 50 per cent. A certain size of band iron has advanced over 100 per cent. We quote these as examples. ||| I JBtill THE ONLY CARLOAD | I Columbia Implement Company I AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, CREAMERY AND DAIRY MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES. |f| New Market Block, 13 to 27 First St. ||| P P. 0. Draw...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

2 I HIGHEST PRIZE HONORS j ® ® ® # ® /G3\ ♦—♦—♦—*—*—*—*—♦—*—*—*—♦—*—*— ♦—»—♦—♦—♦—♦—♦—*—*—*—*—*—*—*— ♦—♦—♦—♦—*—♦—♦—♦—♦—*—*—*—*—*— ———* —* —* —* —* —* —* — • /ggv ® * *' ® 1 1 Cream Separators 1 { ®{• { ® (H) ♦ —♦—♦—♦—♦—*—*—♦—*—*—*—*-•*—*—*—♦—♦—♦—♦-♦—*—*—*—♦— ♦—*—♦—♦—*—*—*—*—♦—*—*—♦—♦—*—*—*—*—♦—♦—*—*—*—*—♦—*—*—*—*—♦ $§ - £& H _ [U aJ| HE DE LAVAL CREAM SEPARATORS have received nearly Two Thousand Prizes, Mcd- $) H |Bnßl Ul<: ])l<: LAVAL CREAM SEPARATORS have received nearly Two Thousand Prizes, Mcd- || §""* ' /iIFI I I a's ' Awards anc* Diplomas, during the twenty years they have been before the public. Five /aa H(I 1 WLJ|[ Hundred of these awards have been Prizes and Medals from Fairs and Exhibitions of marked $& (|§) I 'i||M importance. The collection is representative of every World's Fair and International Exposition (|§ (fS) ijgtl_~~j3^D during such period, every state and almost every county of the United States, and every civilized . (f§) J^M^U country and provinc...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

RANCH AND RANGE Vol. 15 No. 20 SOIL MOISTURE. PAPER READ BEFORE THE FARMERS' SCHOOL AT PULLMAN, WASH., BY BYRON HUNTER. No problem is more important to the farmers of Eastern Washington than the maintenance of a proper supply of JJ^isture in the soil. " The rainfall of the Palouse moun tains average about 25 inches, gradual ly decreasing as one approaches' the center of the state, where less than 10 inches of water falls annually. At the experiment station the average is 21.6 inches. The average for the whole Pa louse country cannot be far from 20 to 22 inches. When we compare this with the rainfall of the Eastern and Middle states, which is from 35 to 40 inches, or with that of the Sound country, which is from 40 to 60 inches, we begin to comprehend its meagerness. I shall refer briefly to some of Prof. King's experiments at the Wisconsin Experiment Station to determine the amount of water necessary to produce a pound of dry matter. Also to deter mine the amount of water our common...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

4 RENOVATING BUTTER. A process butter factory started up in Seattle Mouday. It is in the rear of the Sound Commission Company's headquarters. John T. Heinen is the manager. J. A. O. Bredemeyer is in terested with him. Dairy butter is bought from farmers and country store keepers and shipped in to this firm. It is put first into a vat and heated by steam from 120 to 130 degrees. The impurities sink to the bottom, and the melted butter oil is drained off into an other tank, where milk is added in pro portions of 200 pounds milk to 100 pounds butter and stirred until it be comes thoroughly mixed. Then it is churned into butter again, worked and put up in merchantable shape. "You are aware, Mr. Heinen, that the law requires that such butter shall be branded plainly, are you not?" our representative asked. "We are, certainly, and propose to Jive up to its provisions. We will sell it for what it is." "We expect to find a good market for it, however, not alone locally, but for export. You ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

APPLE CONSUMERS' LEAGUE. Herbert W. Collingwood, editor of the Rural New Yorker, says he never goes to any hotel to eat but he calls for apples, and if he doesn't get them he intimates to the hotel keeper that particular hotel is several years behind the times. He proposes that every one interested in the American apple follow his plan, and thus bring home to hotel keepers the necessity of pro viding apples for their guests as well as tropical fruits. The writer invariably choosefl an apple in preference to an orange or a ifcnnana, and there are many who have a like tendency to favor our own pro duction instead of those brought from a foreign country or a remote part of our own country. It is a fact that about nine times in ten the apples served on hotel tables are not the best varieties nor first-class specimens of the varieties that are served. This suggestion of Mr. Collingwood that we proceed to boom one of our most wholesome products is a good one, and if it were carried out wo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

6 DAIRYING TN UTAH. The president of the Utah Dairy men's Association delivered a valua ble address at the recent sixth annual convention held at Salt Lake City. Re garding the growth of the dairy in dustry in that State, he made the fol lowing report: "I think it is due to the association and to you that I refer to what has been accomplished in making possible the present development of the dairy industry. As mentioned above through the efforts of the association all adul terated and imitation dairy products have been shut out of our market. Perhaps there are few who realize the great advantage this has been to the farmers of the State. Six years ago there was at the outside eight cream eries or factories in the State and the amount of milk handled by the major ity of these was quite limited. The greatest difficulty we had to contend with at that time was the marketing of our produce. Carload after carload of oleomargerine and filled cheese wereshipped into our markets, all of it s...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

a very superior sire the cow would show the influence of that sire in all subsequent progeny. This theory has been stoutly con tended for and as stoutly opposed for years. Yet, nearly all the leading nat uralists of the world have believed it to be true. In Hoard's Dairyman, of May 2, 1890, Mr. Thos. M. Harvey, the noted Guernsey breeder, of Pennsylva nia, gave a very interesting and ex tended article on the above named subject. In this article he cited various em inent authorities in proof of the soundness of the theory. Of these he quoted Dr. Manley Miles as saying: "The influence of the male in the process of procreation is not limited to his immediate offspring, but ex tends also through the female that he has impregnated, to her offspring by another male. Paradoxical as this statement may appear, there are many well authenticated cases on record that cannot be satisfactorily explained on any other hypothesis." The close observing Darwin re marks: "Many well authenticated facts ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

8 Ranch and Range With which is consolidated THE WASHINGTON FARMER. THE PACIFIC COAST DAIUYMAN, THE FARMER AND TURFMAN. Official Organ of Washington State Dairymen's Association. Washington State Livestock Breeders' Association. Freeman & Freeman, Publishers. Under the editorial and business management of MILLER nUEKMAM. Traveling Representative and Corresp<i'dent, LEGH H. FREEMAN. Editorial Offices, - • Seattle, Wash. Telephone Brown 1011. Long iliMuiici* (om eel.on BUSINESS OFFICES Seattle, - - - 527-3:28 Pioneer Build Dg. Spokane, • Suite F Ilypotheekbank Building. Subscription in advance, $1.00 ■ er year. Address all communications to RANCH AND RANGE, 527-528 Pioneer Building, Seattle, Wash. A WESTERN WASHINGTON FAIR There has never been a more oppor tune time than the present for the es tablishment of an annual fair at Seat tle. It requires only that the people of Seattle themselves realize the value that such an exposition would be, and actively enlist themselves in mak...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 20 April 1899

HOP CULTURE. ltY ATG. II.UIMKI, IN YAKIMA lIKKAI.D. The production of hops has become one of the staple industries of the Pa cific coast. As the hop growers have a fair prospect ahead they should tak^ great care In plowing, cultivating, pruning and trimming their hops. Give the yards a deep plowing with a 12-inch plow. Hops will grow on dif ferent varieties of soil, but the deep, river bottom land, mixed with clay, will produce the best quality and larg est quantity. Land with a hard sub |t"il should never be used for hops, as it prevents the roots from going down to draw moisture. In preparing the soil for planting a new yard should be done not later than February, but still better if done in October or November, by plowing the land as deep as one can go down with the plow. Level the field, mark off the ground not less than six and a half or seven feet apart, set the poles before planting, then select two to three good roots and plant them on the northeast side of the pole. Keep al...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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