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Title: Day Book, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 66,432 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

PTrepyapar, .fafca DOINGS OF THE WORLD BOILED DOWN Pity Yuan Shi Kai, late "Strong Man of China"! Man chus believe him traitor. Revo lutionists hate him. Yuan daren't eat food unless prepared by mem bers of own family. And he calls what's troubling him insomnia. "Big Tammany men are taking 'dirty money' ; gambling houses are wide open for a 'price' ; illegal resorts are running even in most exclusive residence districts, and the police force winks at crime." Magistrate Corrigan, N. Y., from bench. Oh, well, Chicago doesn't stand alone, anyhow. Family of Frank R. Reid, can didate for attorney general of Il linois, narrowly escaped asphyxi ation last night. Reid woke up. Room full of coal gas. Managed to crawl to telephone. Family all unconscious when help arrived. Mayor Corbin N. Shook, Lima, O., signed resignation according to custom of party, before taking office. Party now wants to use resignation, but Shook likes may or's chair pretty well, and has re pudiated arrangement. Alfred...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

Why not take up Secretary Knox' connection with revolution in China, and that little question of how it comes that present ad ministration has handed finances of Honduras over to Morgan for some forty years to come? That's a suggestion, based on principle that there isn't much use in digging up buried dirty linen, while there's a whole lot v hanging on the line. Besides, rude persons might think somebody wanted the bur ied dirty linen for campaign ma terial at this present time. Dr. Mary Walker nearly pre cipitated a scandal at Washing ton "by taking off her Prince Al bert coat in Secretary of the In terior Fisher's office. But she had another Prince Albert un derneath it. By the way, Mary wore pink trousers with pink stripes in them. Well, if you do take advantage of Leap Year, you ought to be head of the household, oughtn't you ? Washington has just discov ered that by not supporting Sini ster in Persia. American finan ciers have last $100,000,000 worth of business there. Was Shus...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

E5535H553S3S next her. Careless of h'er not to look where she was sitting! 62 fishermen of Glouster, Mass., were killed at sea during 1911. But we had our fish for break fast. Getting first prize at Spring field, 111., poultry show was so great a shock to golden Wyan dotte cockerell, that it fell dead. It was owned by E. P. Reed, Ob long, 111. Illinois Central pleaded guilty working of train crews over 16 hours a day, at Springfield, and was fined $200 and costs. It also shows it doesn't cost a railroad much to admit it has been endangering the lives and limbs of passengers. And the I. C. says it is "not in the least af fected by the strike." Viola Scott, American, on trial at Berlin charged with swindling. Viola said to have sold book tell ing how enemies could be de prived of power by staring at their noses. If Berlin authorities don't get after people who bought Viola's book and lock 'em up for safe keeping, they aren't onto their jobs. Dr. A. Marie, famous French criminologist, ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

on streets of N. Y. In 1911, 121 by automobiles alone. Torpedo boat destroyer May rant met liner Mauretania at sea, and circled about her twice at full speed and within close range, to show' she could sink her. Fred Eck, N. Y., has 25 cents left to his "name. Turned on gas to die. Supply of gas ran out be cause of quarter-in-the-slot meter and Eck Wouldn't raise another quarter. Ultra fashionable Country Club, Lakewood, N. J., busted all to pieces -hecause Mrs. Jasper Lynch, who lost jewelled bag, had some members searched. Bag wasn't found either. Mrs. Grace Foster, Milwaukee, daughter of Col. A. J. Watrous, put burglar to flight by throwing hot water bag at him. Bag burst, and thief was scalded with boil ing water. President Taft has taken cog nizance of protests to appoint- ment of Wm. Cather Hook to the Supreme Bench, and is now con sidering new candidate Justice Francis J. Swayze, New Jersey Supreme Court. After failing in her home and spraining her ankle, Mrs. Johan na Buffmir...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

JOHNSON QUIT COLD IN FIRST SPARRING MATCH, BUT CLEANED OUT RING IN BATTLE ROYAL LATER I (V I - Springfield, 111., Jan. 3 lack Johnson, champion heavyweight, touring the world, breaking speed laws with high-poweied automo biles, holding his services at $30, 000 win, lose or draw, is a diffei ent proposition from the Jack Johnson, who, a few ycais ago, would fight any one. for am thing from a pork sandwich to a two dollar bill. My, what a differncc a few years make in some folks Johnny Connors, who fought Carpar Leon and Jimmy Uair for the bantam championship years ago, is pioprietor of a sa loon here and like many an old timer, recalls Johnson when the "big cinder" was glad to slime shoes "for a gitnen." "Thirteen ca. ago Johnson didn't know what legular money was," said Connors," reflecting on the champion's present pros perity. "He thought himself lucky to get coffee and rolls. When I fought Jimmv Barry, Johnson was my porter. I know it was hard for him to get the coin and I don't ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

"Most of the stories about Johnson's start in the fight game are yarns." continued Connors. "Take it from me this fellow started right here in Springfield and I was the first man to put a glove on him. "We used to have a boxing show here once in a while in those days. Johnson blew in from down south and T put him to work as porter and let him use that shine stand you see in front of the drum, now. s "About this time Bob Long, a "negro welter came here after beating wonderful Rube Fe'rns in Kansas City and I took charge of his business. The first match I got for him was with Martin Judge, of Chicago. Sparring partners were hard to find and I suggested that John son go on with him. Jack was a giant and we thought he could stand the gaff. "That afternoon Johnson and several others beat it to the levee where Long was training. When Johnson put on the gloves he was nervous, and when Long planted his left "into Jack's midsection the big smoke shook off the gloves and hiked back to the shi...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

WHAT'S BITING OSBORN? Let us rise to inquire what has got into Chase Osborn. governor of Michigan. Chase used to act like a pretty good fellow, but'listen to what he got off his mind yesterday: "I would' urge that both Taft and La Follette withdraw from the race for the presidential nom ination, and allow Roosevelt to come to the fore. "As between Taft and La Foll ette. I am for Taft, because the La Follette style of campaign tends to arouse the passions of the people and make for a condi tion of public intolerance which is always worse than personal or individual intolerance, because it has so much more might as a force. "We have got to have big busi ness in this country if we are to compete in the manufactures and transactions of the world." Thereafter, Chase set to work and denounced La Follette as a "politician." Now, in the first place. Chase must have done some politics himself before he got to be gov ernor of Michigan. The only question is, with whom did Chase do his politick...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

WILL CHICAGO WOMEN WEAR THESE? These are some of the things seen at the Chicago jtyles show slightly exaggerated hy Artist Valentine. The central figure shows a fine lace hat, followed by plume. Note the big bas-relief buckle. Athwart the background reclines a young person whose gown is trimmed with leather buttons and a Turkish towel. Below are seen a btout effect in a floral arch hat and a double barreled handbag. Also a thin lady in a combination of Oriental ideas.

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

JOHN HOBBS LEARNS THAT HE'S PART OF THE STATE GOVERNMENT AND GETS BUSY By W. G. Shepherd. '(Staff Correspondent.) Madison, Wis., Jan. 3. By this time, John Hobbs, who had been helped by the state to get his sal ary when he was injured, whose daughter Mary had secured a shortening of her work day with the aid of the state, whose daugh ter Annie's complaint to the state had resulted in the losing of a number of evil resorts, and whose two sons were receiving an educa tion in their trades that was prac tically free, began to feel that, after all, he really did have some influence with the big state of Wisconsin. As he thought it over he began to realize that he himself was part of the state government and that every other decent citizen of the state was also a part of the gov ernment. This belief made John "Hobbs feel like a strong, self-respecting citizen; it made his feel as if he owed a duty to his state, the duty of being as good a citizen as he could be and of seeing that his chil...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

MOTHER EARTH DASHES THREE MILLION MILES NEARER THE SUN Washington, Jan. 3. This earth has dashed 3,000,000 miles nearer the fiery furnace of the sun, in the past few months, ac cording to statements given out here today and verified from the highest astronomical sources. If this rate of speed continues we will crash into the sun on Thanksgiving day, 1927, and be totally destroyed in one puff of smoke. According to astronomers at the United States observatory here we have been on this mad fall toward the sun since 2 a. m. last July 3. Each day since that lot Jul)r morning this terrestrial sphere, in its1 mad flight through ;pace, has "dropped" more than 16,000 miles toward the sun. This morning we are only 91.- But long before then we would all be roasted to a good dark brown; oceans would be dried up, a thimbleful of ice would be worth more than all the diamonds ($) :&? 000,000 miles from the sun; July 3 you remember how hot it was then ? We were 94,000,000 miles distant. At thi...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

000 miles is near enough for her. Before bedtime tonight she will begin steering away from Old Sol. While we are celebrating the next Fourth of July she will slip into the place she occupied July 3, 1911 the point farthest from the sun. Uncle Sam's astronomers gravely remark "the earth's orbit is an ellipse of small eccentricity, in one of whose foci is the sun: it follows therefore that the earth is at perihelion at the beginning of the year, and at aphelion about the middle of the year' All of which means in pla,in United States that the earth's path around the sun is shaped something like a goose egg, the sun being at one side on the cen ter. In January we are at the point nearest the sun; in July, farthest. But a little thing like 3,000,000 miles doesn t cut much ice with the weather man; he goes right along giving us the blizzards and zero stuff. He says that a few million miles more or less doesn't effect our climate because of the slanting waj' the sun's rays strike us. DEAF ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

mmmmm ii m p m m imtnyttj . r1 lir '" W 5"33B OSCAR'S ENTHUSIASM STRIKES HIM COLOR-BLIND 5HOUUT)YOUR LOVC PN ON YOUR COAT TH IS SoiV OF Slue-." An, sonepoDY has sent ne 4 leap ysar Lerreft I bet fO'3 Ml3 DILLPTCKLC3. i i ' IP YOUR IjOVE For Me u Jet WEAK JNSTEVJD TH SOW OF TIED . TEE-HEE. y' N r,, ' "I ry ' r i V6N SHE SEES I diss vow of Blue. i SHE vill know V' BT?uTe! w tore iss T"ue. ' don-t speak HuWWMTOR ) XJoMtfy ' -r',r iS ""-- "s - "

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

' Sftr OSArA f '' ONLY COT DO YOU S5 0 (S5 4HYOIN9S Ren. DER MATTER V J HIT DISS 8LU6 jp llOr W. bl o 0 THE DAILY SHORT STORY The Stenographer. The'new hospital stenographer was alert to all that went on among the nurses who filed by the desk, going to and fro from duty on the upper floors or stop ping to ask her for mail. One of these, Teresa, was dis tinguished both for weight and wit. All liked Teresa, but none of them ever took the trouble to let her know it. It would have done her a lot of good, sometimes, if they had. As it was, when a grateful pa tient "G. P." among them sent out invitations for a little party, the question .arose as to how many .of the girls in training might go. The stenographer overheard "Maggie Irish" ask Teresa if she were going.- "No" "Why not?" "Well, if I did go and tried to have any fun you'd all call me the elephant, and then I haven't any thing to wear" That was the first time the ste nographer had ever heard or seen Teresa show that she was hurt b...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

Ti t ' " T .TIM ' a had one or two waves in it? The stenographer lunched with Aunt Mary the next day, and car ried home a black chiffon, which she sent by express to Teresa, with a note, "From one who is mad "because she isn't plump enough to wear a decent gown any more." She managed to get Teresa into an arrangement of stays, and she patted up her hair in some puffs one night to show her how, and then just as she was planning to be Teresa's beau for the evening, of course something happened. She was laid up the whole day of the party. And Charley, whom she hadn't seen for a year, had to send on that very afternoon a special de livery that he was coming into town about 5 .p. m. for two or three days. Oh, was there any justice in anything? A spasm of pain across her eyes answered. Charley in town, and an evening for someone else "planned previ ously, and and both ruined. . . . Oh, a bright thought ran sharply as the neuralgia. Charley could take Teresa to the party. He knew a number ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

wmmmmmmmmmmmsBgsBssm SHE TURNED BILL POSTER TO HELP HUBBY AND -SHE MADE GOOD AT IT Mrs. Polkingham, From Snap? shot Taken While She Was A. tually at Work. 1 litfi Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 3 Mrs. Grace Polkingham enjoys the unique distinction of being the only woman bill poster in the West, and probably the only one in America. For eight hours every day she can be seen slapping on th? big,

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

gaudy theater signs, and she does not use that dainty, modest slush to her big brush that is character istic of her sex. She slaps the paste on just like a man and quicker and better than some men. She makes $2.50 per day and she earns the money. Her husband, W. F. Polking ham, is a bill poster. He had a hard time finding reliable help, so "the missus" jumped in and he has never wanted for reliable help since. She started at the work like an old timer, and it never even blistered her hands. Sounds funny, but it's right. She is a big, robust, healthy woman and somewhat of an ath lete besides. She can pick up two 50 pound sacks of flour and put one on each shoulder with ease. Mrs. Polkingham likes being a bill poster. Here's what she has to say about it: "When a man is in trouble, his wife should always be the first one to the rescue. Mr. Polk ingham was about to lose several contracts, which meant bread and butter to us, so I concluded to be a bill poster. "I like the work fine It is...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

WHY NOT HELP THE PEOPLE NOW? Lots of Subway Talk About the Future, and Mighty Little Doing to Improve the Service on Existing Street Railways. At a recent meeting of the city council, Alderman Britten of the 23rd ward, introduced a resolu tion which provided that the cor poration counsel give an opinion whether the city has the right and power to enforce a single fare, universal transfer over the lines of the Chicago Elevated Rail ways. The Chicago Elevated Rail ways is 'a consolidation of the South Side Elevated Railroad company, the Metropolitan West Side Elevated Railway company and the Northwestern Elevated Railroad company, which also controls the Chicago and Oak Park Elevated Railroad system. The consolidation has been in effect for six months or more, and no move has been made by either the Chicago Elevated Railways or the city council to make the changes promised the people of Chicago. "In a statement of June 28, 1911, Henry A. Blair, chairman of the board of the Chicago Rai...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm the present transportation facil ities." The mayor and the city council seem to be sleeping, and the Chi cago Elevated Railways respect fully declines to do anything for the people, just as long as it does not have to. The whole proposition sterns to be up to the people and they should demand the right to be heard. The subway is so closely link ed with the question of elevated service that no division seems possible. Last Sunday The Tribune said: "The subway commission pre dicts that actual construction on a rapid transit system will be started by July 1 next. An ap propriation of $2,200,000 has been asked and the commission hopes to be able to spend the major por tion of it during the next twelve months. "All of the plans and predic tions relate to two track bores for express service on the elevat ed roads. Subways for the sur face lines, according to the pres ent program, will not be consid ered until later. "The all important question of the necessary funds, which...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm tHe same capacity. In other words, the engineers figure that the elevated roads could bring 3,200 cars to the loop district with the subways, while now they only bring 915. In passengers commission represents that the present capacity is 45,750. while with subwavs the number could be 160,000. " "There are four important mat ters to be disposed of before dig ging will probably begin. The committee on local transporta tion and the council must decide upon the routes and the location of the stations. ' "It may be deemed advisable for the city to reach the agree ment with the elevated roads re garding the amount of rent they shall pay for the use of tin- sub ways before the tunnels are started. "The fourth possible hinder ance to progress may be the con solidation of the surface and ele vated lines and the granting of a new franchise to the consoli dated company. "As a .preliminary to consoli dation an appraisal of the elevat ed properties must be made." Note that the Tr...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 3 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmm CYNTHIA GREY ADVISES THE PUZZLED Have a friend, a beautiful and good girl. She hasi become ac quainted with several girls, who, although their parents are highly respected, are not the kind of girls the rest of the set care to as sociate with. My friend has taken a liking to them, and although she has heard rumors about them, persists in keeping them as friends. We have pleaded with her in vain to give them up. but she claims a friend is a friend, no matter whether poor or rich, shunned or respected. She claims these girls never had a chance, and she is trying to give it to them now. We are afraid that people who do not know her as we do will misjudge her. Is there nothing that her friends who love her can do to persuade her to drop the ob jectionable acquaintances? Do vou think she is in the right? G. M. What is there wrong in valuing these girls as she knows them rather than as rumor paints them? And what difference does it make whether people who do not know her misju...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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