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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News Volume 56, Number 10 'Stick together' for impact, Sabato tells FB By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND-Dr. Larry Sabato told Farm Bureau members that a proposed car tax exemption has a good chance of passing in the Virginia General Assembly. Sabato, a political analyst, spoke Dec. 3 as part of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 72nd Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. Governor-elect James Gilmore won the November election partly because of his promise to push through a $20,000 exemption on the car tax. State lawmakers who oppose the car tax exemption "will be looking for other work in the next election," said Sabato, a professor of government at the University of Virginia. "If you stop the people's car tax (exemption), you're dead in 1999." The General Assembly begins |an. 14. William P. Freeman, a VFBF board member, asked Sabato how county governments will compensate for revenue loss if the exemption passes. "Gilmore had better hope the econom...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News iur mm H Bg -1 •" *S: WWmmmw ' jIHSHhHK r -»jst y Km t IHh Miiifs wm, MHu !,i .«» ■roaw—T ■* f ■ .if. :■;,"•••.• ■B&agSßag^Mui Members take a break to browse and buy Teresa Harris, a Virginia Farm Bureau Federation employee, helps Farm Bureau members select products In the Exhibit Hail at the VFBF Annual Convention. The convention, which drew more than 700 members from across the state, was Dec. 1-4 at the Richmond Marriott. The Exhibit Hail featured crafts, peanuts, tire products, a health screening booth, computers for visiting websites and a safety exhibit. Voluntary practices have improved environment By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND —Voluntary achievements by farmers play a key role in Virginia's conservation efforts. That was the message of three speakers who spoke at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention on Dec. I. "Voluntary programs and the stewardship approach we use in Virginia are the key to our success,"...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

December 1997/ January 1998 Almanac says earth may cool next century While weather forecasters struggle with getting the five-day forecast correct, we are supposed to believe that some scientists are able to accurately forecast the weather for the next century. Their forecast is for temperatures to be warmer-not just in one part of the country, but all over the globe. If only there were a totally reliable weather service that could tell us for sure whether global warming will be a problem. Look on the Right to Farm, research funding among top issues State lawmakers will convene in Richmond on Jan. 14 for a 60-day session. They will consider a variety of issues, including agricul-ture-related items. Much of the session will focus on a plan of gover-nor-elect James S. Gilmore 111 to eliminate the personal property tax up to $20,000 of assessed value on vehicles. Farmers have posted a number of issues that they want lawmakers to support during the General Assembly session. These includ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News A, J[ The perfect truck for all you farm animals is Magnum V-6 or V-8 engine. Even our Ram Vans a Dodge. And if you 're a member of a partic- and Ram Wagons are part of the deal with $500 Jjl ipating state Farm Bureau, this is the perfect back. All this cash is on top of any other jKftjjL .|J|^ ; . time to buy one. national Dodge consumer incentive offer, too.** jHpjft As a member, All you need to do is get a certificate from Regular and Club Cab Pickups.* And $500 back on WT at **° St 30 5 * Then stop by Ram 2500 and 3500 Pickups and -> m your Dodge dealer. Where you'll I Chassis Cabs, and including our new ane °f t^iat our full line of Magnum® engines including the 1 || I//: I/O l/lfl i • f~, rp i nv-__l 'Excludes Quad Cab. "This cash back offer is valid for members of partici- M,Jj V"0, V-O, V-IU atta trie luroo Uiesei. pating Farm Bureaus, is scheduled to expire 7/31/98, and is subject to change. 11/„»_„ „~„l, I.„„L- It may not be used in combination ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

December 1997/ January 1998 State vet, young farmer pioneer get accolades By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND-Virginia cattlemen are once again free to ship livestock across state and international boundaries without extra testing, thanks to the efforts of Dr. William Sims, Virginia's state veterinarian. And young farmers may not have had as strong of a voice in the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation if not for the organizing talents of W.C. (Bud) Cheatham Jr., southeastern district field service director from 1968 to 1987. Both men were awarded the 1997 VFBF Distinguished Service Award on Dec. 3 at the VFBF's 72nd Annual Convention. "Bill Sims has done more to restore Virginia's tuberculosis-free status with the U.S. Department of Agriculture than anyone else," said VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth. "During the past two years, Virginia cattlemen have been forced to pay thousands of dollars in additional testing fees in order to certify their animals TB-free," he added. "Restor...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News New director has vast experience (Continued from page 1) Hickman will represent farmers in Accomack, Isle of Wight and Northampton counties, and the cities of Chesapeake, Suffolk and Virginia Beach. He is the co-owner and operator of Dublin Farms Inc., which produces approximately 400 acres of potatoes, 1,200 acres of corn and 500 acres of soybeans. Hickman has been an Accomack County Farm Bureau board member since 1982. He served as president of the county Farm Bureau from 1987 until 1994. Before that, he was the county's young farmer chairman for four years. Currently, Hickman is a member of the VFBF New Services Committee, the VFBF Potato and Trouble with bad science predicted By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director RICHMOND-Farmers will continue to fight harmful regulations in 1998. That was the message from Virginia Farm Bureau Federation President C. Wayne Ashworth. He spoke to about 700 farmers who attended the VFBF 72nd Annual Convention on Dec. 2. "Farme...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

December 1997/ January 1998 Poultry producer is Farm Woman of Year By JOHNNA MILLER VFBF Video/Radio Producer RICHMOND-Whether in a classroom, at church, or on her family's farm, Jacquelin Easter loves to teach. During her years as a teacher at the Amelia Academy she taught students everything from the alphabet to home economics to calculus. Now, as a full-time farmer she teaches the importance of agriculture and stewardship of the land. That eagerness to educate is just one of the many reasons Mrs. Easter was chosen the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1998 Farm Woman of the Year. She received the award Dec. 1 during the VFBF's 1997 Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. The award spotlights a farm woman whose achievements mark the importance of women to their family farms and the agriculture industry. Not only does Mrs. Easter run the day-to-day operations on her family's 112-acre beef and poultry operation, she has also dedicated much of her time working as an advocate for ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News EPA official praises stewardship law By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND-A U.S. Environmental Protection Agency official praised Virginia's Agricultural Stewardship Act and said it is the best of its kind in the nation. William Matuszeski, director of the EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program Office, said the act, also known as the "Bad Actor Law," is excellent. He spoke Dec. 1 at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 72nd Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. The new law went into effect April I, and it calls for investigations of farm practices when someone complains. The law allows farmers to solve problems in early stages and without a fine in most cases. At the request of ag groups, state lawmakers adopted the stewardship law to protect the state's water resources from the bad practices of a few. Virginia also has a good permitting program for feedlot operations, the EPA official said. During a question and answer session, Dinwiddie County farmer Alvin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

December 199 7/january 1998 Essex Co. teen crowned 1998 Miss Farm Bureau By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND-Mary Stuart Haile, 18, of Essex County is the new Miss Virginia Farm Bureau. She was chosen by a panel of judges during competition on Dec. I as part of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 72nd Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. She was one of seven contestants. Miss Haile, daughter of Dr. John and Patricia Haile of Tappahannock, is a sophomore at Virginia Tech. She is a biology major with an emphasis in medicine and plans to attend nursing school for three years and become a nurse practitioner. As a nurse practitioner, she plans to serve rural Virginia, where she will work with agriculture producers. Her father is a veterinarian in King William County, and she has worked as his assistant for several years. She considered a career as a veterinarian, but said, "1 like interacting with people." As Miss Farm Bureau, she will represent Farm Bureau at fairs ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News Honor student named top agriculturalist By JOHNNA MILLER VFBF Video/Radio Producer RICHMOND — Honor student Crystal Gormus has been named the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmers' Outstanding Agriculturalist. The Buckingham County High School senior received the award on Dec. I during the Young Farmers' Awards Breakfast at the VFBF's 1997 Annual Convention. Miss Gormus, 1 7, is the daughter of Benjamin and Alice Gormus of Dillwyn. Her experiences working on the family cattle farm and as an agriculture teacher's assistant for handicapped students have heightened her desire to become an agriculture teacher. "Crystal exhibits a level of maturity and character above most of her peers," said Peter Senger, agriculture education teacher at Buckingham Vocational Center. "She has become interested and excited about the opportunities available to her through agriculture education." Miss Gormus' achievements include a 4.0 grade point average, parliamentarian of the St...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

December 1997/ January 1998 Farm Bureau kids creat By CHRIS BAXTER VFBF Graphic Designer RICHMOND-Thirteen children were recognized at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1997 Annual Convention for creating posters that best depicted farm life. The winning posters were on display at the Richmond Marriott throughout the Dec. 1-4 convention. The winners received trophies for their efforts. Farm Bureau women's committees sponsored the contest within their counties to promote interest among children of Farm Bureau members. The junior contest involved ages 4-6, and the senior contest covered ages 7-10. Top essay writers get savings bond By CHRIS BAXTER VFBF Graphic Designer RICHMOND — For 10-year-old Nicole Capps, the importance of agriculture is obvious. "If we did not have farms, we would not have enough food for everyone," she explained in an award-winning essay presented at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Annual Convention Dec. 1. The Farm Bureau Women's Committee sponsors th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News FB honors Charlottesville and Lynchburg media By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director RICHMOND-For the third consecutive year WVIR-TV 29 in Charlottesville has captured the broadcast category of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Journalism Awards, while reporter Christy McKay of the Lynchburg News & Daily Advance has taken top honors in the print category. WVIR-TV won the broadcast category in 1995 and shared the honor last year with WTVR-TV 6 in Richmond. The News & Daily Advance won the print award for the second time in the competition's 10-year history. The newspaper's earlier award came in 1989. The awards were presented during VFBF's 1997 Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott Dec. 3. The recognition is given each year to the newspaper and radio or television news operations that best cover and analyze agriculture over the course of a year. "Channel 29 blended beautiful videography with factual reporting to cover agriculture ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

December 1997/lanuary 1998 (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One i 5-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the lOTH of each month preceding the publication month. I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. I Ads MUST include member number to be published. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE:...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News Tazewell teen honored as leader By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND-Agriculture is a good way of life, according to the daughter of a 6th-generation farmer. "Agriculture is very important to me and my family because it is a good way of life and a good place to raise a family," said Robin Elizabeth Corell of Tazewell County. She made her comments as part of her presentation to win the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1997 Youth Leadership Award Dec. 1. The Tazewell High School junior received the award during Family Night at the VFBF's 72nd Annual Convention ... 40% of people in Virginia over 65 will enter a nursing home facility* ... their stay will cost them between $75,000 to $125,000** HI /y - Some Benefits of Our Plan Are: • Care or Assistance • Adult Day Care Received in Your Home . Assisted Ljving Fad , jty • " ome Maker c or . • Adult Congregate Companion Services Uving Facility ' • Personal care attendant . Nursjng home car£ • Alternative care facil...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

December 1997/ January 1998 Zero in on a few key issues, speaker says (Continued from page 8) stand issues and this will help them to be understood by those involved in making regulations. "Zero in on a few key issues of greatest interest," Korves noted. "Work for change. Outline things you want to do and go after them. Slowly but surely we're getting the attention of politicians." In discussing the Chesapeake Bay, Matuszeski said the bay is a "very shallow body of water" and that 111,000 miles of streams and rivers drain into it. Thirty percent of the bay is only two meters or less in depth. This lets light reach the bottom and allows shellfish and grasses to flourish. "Half of America's blue crabs are from the Chesapeake Bay," Matuszeski said. When excessive nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorous, drain into the bay, this causes algae blooms, which can kill aquatic life. Twenty percent of the nitrogen in the bay is from the air, and it travels to the East Coast from Ohio Vall...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1997

Farm Bureau News / BBssßl' t"' 1 ,* # Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Burea offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? 00 a a i 3 K £ V £ E v I 0 k. v X E 9 2 <c in «* £ 3 1 You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! 1 ~' i gffi ■ M •? <! * :ffi^: ■ - : - • '"gH| ' k?\' J r -. ffi* y,?™ % *? mm& &•,*.. JjNs f- £ # '*%•, 1 vl 1 ! B I ?■ w i b^Br* J m « aßto£r^ll V V®M»a?S ;;"' Ik 11 E. M ■tt* m BBMH^pEj ■ ri ■UVi -J Igf 7 ■Bj jfll' w*l@H" ? ** ' ** 1 t P : iMBBRE --' The Voice of Virginia's Agricultural Producers Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throug...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau I . News/ Volume 58, Number 1 Concern is who will farm in next millennium Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of articles about the challenges confronting Virginia's future generations of farms and farm families. By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—If a typical farmer produces food for 129 Americans, what happens if that farmer retires and isn't replaced? What happens to the land where he or she farmed? How would this affect the farm equipment store or feed store where he shopped? What if all 40,000 farmers in Virginia retired one by one and no one replaced them? The average age of farmers in this state is 55. These are questions that agriculture leaders are asking because these are events that could occur. In fact, it has the potential to happen across America. Farmers make up only 2 percent of the population, and as they retire, young farmers aren't rushing in to replace them. "This is the most critical problem facing agriculture over the next 20 y...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News 10 Nutrient specialists not enough (Continued from page 1) they voted it as one of 10 legislative priorities this year. "If they (legislators) want to mandate nutrient management plans, then they need to pay" for the technical assistance needed to write and enforce the plans, said Terry Martin, a Shenandoah County poultry producer and cattleman. Martin said he's had a nutrient management plan for about five years now, but couldn't have developed one without the help of the nutrient management specialist who works in his area. Even without new mandates to regulate poultry producers, there aren't enough resource people to help farmers comply with existing mandates, such as the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act and requirements for Animal Feeding Operations, said Wilmer Stoneman, senior assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "There are only about 10 nutrient management specialists in all of Virginia trying to address the needs of 1,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

February 1999 Farm Bureau working to get settlem Virginia tobacco growers, like many other hard-working farmers across the state, are seeing their incomes dwindle right before their very eyes. For more than three decades, unfair excise taxes have riddled the state's 8,000 tobacco-growing families by inhibiting cigarette demand, and hence sales, through hefty local, state and federal taxes. These taxes amount to as much as 53 1/2 cents per pack of cigarettes. And for the past two years, growers of the golden leaf have seen their quota allotments—the amount of tobacco the government decides they can grow— reduced by about 32 percent. Quotas are determined by the federal government and are based in part on the buying intentions (demand) of the major tobacco companies. With tobacco as the backbone of many Southside and Southwest Virginia economies, Pork producers seeing hard times Times are hard for hog farmers. If you apply inflation, we're witnessing the lowest hog market in history. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1998

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Right to Farm laws under attack by state lawmakers RICHMOND—AIong with the new year, Virginia farmers are preparing for new attacks on a law that protects them from unfair restrictions. Sen. Madison Marye, D~ Shawsville, chairman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources, has prefiled a bill to revoke provisions of the Right to Farm Act for confined animal feeding operations of 300 animal units or more. "This is a frightening scenario for Virginia farmers," warned Wilmer Stoneman, senior assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "This bill would gut the Right to Farm Act." if the bill passes, no livestock operation would be protected from a locality that may want it shut down simply because of its smell, Stoneman said. "Even worse, anyone living near a farm could sue the farmer for almost any reason, such as smell, noise, dust or whatever," he added. Right to Farm laws protect farmers from unrea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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