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Elephind.com contains 17,012 items from Murchison Advertiser And Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna And Dargalong Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MEXICAN AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

MEXICAN AGRICULTURE. In an interesting article relating to agriculture in Mexico, published by the International Institute of Agriculture, a description of the country and its agricultural resources is given. The climate, partly in relation to altitude, varies greatly in different parts of the country, so that the variety of pro ducts that can be produced in the generally rich soil is extensive. The resources for the breeding and feed ing of live stock are very great, as there are 124,000,000 acres of grass land, and in the cooler parts of the great country the conditions are fav orable. As with agriculture generally, however, opportunities for the im provement and increased production of animals are comparatively neglect ed, and a National Agricultural Com mission was recently appointed to in quire into the causes and suggest re medies for difficulties, including those of land tenure. The latest live stock census tvas taken in 1902, when the returns were:—5,142,457 cattle, 3,424, 4...

Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

fk fiflfX^ gf*. « * »'. .^:;iV;>' *' ^ hts^jj.&i2|'5 £! 3J ?I s I ZZW& t»hW >mi ■II i|inillliniCTPa«<a^ZMg "Blackstone" Oil Engines CLUTTERBUCR BROS.: Sole Agents in Australia for "Olds" Petrol..Engines Pastoralists and Dairy Farmers should Inspect these Engines. Unequalled for Shearing Plants, etc. STATIONARY OR PORTABLE. SAFE, RELIABLE AND ECONOMICAL. ALSO PREMIER GAS ENGINES AND POWER GAS ENGINES. Visit our SHOWROOMS, 585 Bourke Street, Melbourne, or STAND No. 99, R.A. Show, behind the Secretary's Office, near Main - - ■ 'V f ^ c sS ' V Carriage Entrance. Hopper or Tank Cooled 7\ CLUTTERBUCK BROS., 585 Bourke-st., Melbourne

The Kind Man. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

The Kind Man. Mr. Roosevelt tells about a beggar who was given a pair of boots by an old lady. The boots were too small "for him, so he pawned them and backed a horse with the proceeds. 'The horse came in last, but that really has' nothing to do with the story. Some days later, encouraged by his former success/ the beggar paid an other call on the old lady. - "But what have you done with the nice pair of boots. I gave you the other-- day?"- she., asked .suspiciously. "Why aren't you wearing them?" "They were too small for. me; lidy,''" the man replied,' "so I—I put them on a, horse." . '"Put them on a horse!" excla.med the old lady. "I' didn't know that horses could wear hoots, but it was very kind and thoughtful of vou. Here's half-a-crown. for you!"

MAIZE. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

MAIZE. In selecting the land for your maize crop, if possible choose an autumn ploughed field rather than one to be ploughed in the spring. If a heavy crop of clover or some other heavy growing crop were turned under last autumn, the land is better able to produce a large crop of maize. If a heavy application of barn manure has been put on, and can be well worked and mixed with the soil, it offers a rich piece of ground.. A combination of the green manure with the stable manure, if ploughed deeply in the au tumn, so they are well mixed and well rotted, will probably give the most plant food without going to the expense of 'buying commercial fer tilisers. "When we realise that a good maize crop needs over 1600 tons of water per acre to produce a full crop, we can see why there is great need of saving all the moisture in the soil. The ploughed land, due to the rains and settling, becomes packed down, and forms a crust on its surface after the warm spring sun has dried it out somewhat....

AH, THE POWER OF A SINGLE FACE. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

AH, THE POWER OF A SINGLE FACE. Mr. KoonKan was in a greatly per turbed state of mind. He was running for a train and feared he was late. In an agony of suspense and mental , anguish, he labored on with what speed he might while burdened down with heavy despair. - While he was thus suffering .and making his suffering most noticeable to the casual observer, he suddenly saw a' face—a placid, common face; but it bore a message of courage and hope for him. • It made him ashamed, instantly, that he was perturbed or an guished in spirit over so small a thing as the prospect of missing a train. His features relaxed; his mouth shut like a steel trap whose spring has sud denly been released. Calm entered his spirit; his pace slackened. The face he had seen was that of the station clock, and it told him he had ten minutes in which to find his seat in his train.

Land Settlement in the North. (Written for the Show Supplement.) [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

Land Settlement in the North. (Written for the Show Supplement.) When I -wrote in these columns some twelve months ago it was to give a brief outline of the purchases made by the Closer Settlement Board of the Stanhope, Bonshaw, Lauder dale and Robgill estates, in the par ish of Girgarre, with the object of establishing an irrigation area and promoting land settlement on small holdings. Naturally, a great deal of -work and expense are entailed in lay ing out such estates as these for oc cupation by the land-seeker. Success can only be achieved with the aid of water, and to ensure an adequate supply the Government sends akmg a gang of competent surveyors and their assistants, 'whose duty it is to devolve a scheme of reticulation by gravitation, which will ensure to every settler on the estate not only an abundant but a permanent supp y of "water. At Lauderdale estate much of this work has been completed, and there now-exists a complete network of channels, and for a number of holding...

HELPING THE EMPIRE. What to Grow for the Army. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

HELPING THE EMPIRE. What to Grow for the Army. The farmer can do more than look on while our brothers are fighting (writes A.G.S. in an interesting arti cle). There will fie some products in eager demand, and others slumped. As one who is not an expert in these matters, but more of an. onlooker, I think it would be a fine thing if the military authorities, in conjunction with some of the best commercial ex-, perts, were to announce to us what agricultural products, in their opin ion, will be badly wanted while the conflict lasts. This is a time of year when we can in many ways adapt our operations to suit the coming needs. A Cry for Wool. To begin with, there will be a tre mendous call for wool. The 'millions of troops in the field will be wearing ' woollen clothing, and, while the pro viding of their first equipment will empty the world's mills of all avail able wool fabrics, there will be a con tinual, and perhaps feverish demand for more wool to repair the wear, tear and renewals...

THE RIGHT TIME TO WED. What the Author of "How to be Happy though Married" Says about It. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

THE RIGHT TIME TO WED. What the Author of "How to be Happy though Married" Says about It. "People rush, into matrimony as they rush to catch a train, and in their hur ry they sometimes catch the wrong train. The rush in reference to mar riage generally comes either from the desperation of advancing years or from the inexperience of youth." That there is a world of wisdom in the words of the Rev. E. J. Hardy, who has been writing on the subject of the right time to marry, few will deny, although there will probably be a number of dissentients to his remark that "few men under thirty years of age are fitted to have the care of a wife." But, as he points out, much depends on the man. "Some men," he says, "are more cap able of taking upon themselves the duties of marriage at twenty-five than others are at thirty-five. Between these two ages is the usual time, and if men put off much after the last mentioned age, they are likely to get into the habit of celibacy, which, like all other ba...

Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

Nicholson AND Morrow's UNION" FARM IMPLEMENTS. ii Established 1852. The "UNION" HARVESTER has won every Government field trial held in Victoria. The lightest draught machine on the market. In various widths up to 6ft. The Very Latest in SEED DRILLS. IN HOE and DISC PATTERNS. All Sizes. The Implement of the year. "UNION" CULTIVATOR. No farmer should be without one. THE LATEST PLOUGH ON THE MARKET. The Most Up-to-date. In Set and Stump-Jump Patterns. ALL SIZES. Send for Illustrated Catalogue of All Kinds of Farm Implements. NICHOLSON & MMMW, BOUVER1E & LEICESTER STS., CARLTON, MELBOURNE. SYDNEY, ADELAIDE AND PERTH

Joseph's Programme. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

Joseph's Programme. The mistress of the house is- a cul tivated Bostonian of,. musical taste, and the whistling of- the footman, who believed.-himself alone in the house, fretted her artistic soul. "Joseph," she called at last from the head of the back stairs,. "please don't whistle those- vulgar ragtime things!-" . - "Yes, ■ mem," returned Joseph, meekly; "I know, mem," he contin ued, with unexpected spirit; "but you can't expect,a,rhapsody of Liszt with cleaning the knives. That will come later, when I'm polishing the silver."

Not Guilty, My Lord! [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

Not 6'u.Hty, My Lord! There's a good story being told just now of Mrs. Lloyd. George's encoun ter v/ith a" Hertfordshire "working man who wanted to know what her hus band did with all the money he got as Chancellor of the Exchequer. "Where do all those millions go?" he demanded. . " "It all goes for insurance and old age pensions, and the Navy, and" so on," Mrs. Lloyd George replied. But- her antagonist had all the fig ures at "his finger-ends. So many million, he said, went for old-age pen sions/ so many to the Navy, so maiiy for insurance, and so "on. "That - leaves--a. million not accounted for," hej> proceeded accusingly... . "Now,. ,-what'mahout, that other million?"! . ' • f'Oh, please' believe me," cried Mrs.' Lloyd George, distractedly, "I haven't got'it!" . .

STRANGE MEETING. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

STRANGE MEETING, Canon Roberts, of Manchester; rec tor of St. John's, Longsight, who row ed in the Oxford boat fifty years ago, is the hero of a strange.story of co-... incidence. On one of the steamers following . the race this year he met a country gentleman of upright . carriage and. healthy eye, who hovered' around"for; some minutes. Taking courage in botlf\ hands, he dared the question: "Did you happen to row in this race fifty years ago?" "I did." "Are you Roberts?" "I am. Who are you?" "Kelly." "You rowed bow to my three?" "That's right." And in all the past fifty years they had never met since the boat race of 1864 till the boat race of 1914,

BATTLE OF THE PHOSPHATES. The Question of Citric Solubility. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

BATTLE OF THE PHOSPHATES. The Question of Citric Solubility. Many farmers may remember the wordy war that occurred some years ago between the advocates of super phosphate, as' representing water soluble phosphate, and the advocates of raw insoluble phosphate • finely ground. The struggle between the two forms of phosphate was of short duration, and ended in a decisive vic tory for superphosphate. The battle of the phosphates has now been transferred to basic slag, and is being hotly contested between those who advocate that slag should be sold only on its percentage of cit ric-soluble (Wagner's test), and those 1 who hold the opinion that the sale of slag should not be restricted' to this one method, which they characterise as arbitrary. The various champions of different methods back up their views by ar guments, and farmers must be puz zled as to which combatant deserves the prize—namely, the farmers' cus tom. So far no knock-out ■ blow has been given, though to the onlooker the c...

Scotch Kid. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

Scotch Kid. "I want a pair of shoes for this lit tle "boy," said Mrs. Maedougal. "French kid, ma'am?" inquired the shoemaker politely. "Indeed not," said Mrs. Macdougall with some heat; "he's my own son, and was born and bred in Scotland." "Miss Sumpkins is a very sharp spoken girl," said Blifkins to one of his friends. "Yes; it has struck me so." "Do you think she is a woman who would make home happy?" "I couldn't say as to that; but I think you could count on her to make it lively and interesting." "My dear," said Mrs. Henpeck, "I'm positive that our boy is thinking seri ously of matrimony." "Well, I only hope so," returned Henpeck with unusual * spirit. "I wouldn't want any boy of mine to. be. so unfortunate as to regard it as a joke." "Now, Freddie, go and kiss your little sweetheart, and make it uo," said Freddie's mother. "No, I won't." "Go and tell her how much you love her and how sorry you are." "No, I won't. Pa says he got into a breach of promise case by tellin' a girl th...

Happy Thought. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

Happy Thought. Mother - (after relating pathetic story): Now, Reggie, wouldn't you like to give your bunny to that poor little boy you saw .to-day who hasn't any father? - Reggie (clutching .rabbit): Couldn't we give him father instead?'

The Same. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

Th*e Same. "What color eyes do you like best, Billy?" "I dunno. - What color are' yours supposed to be?" . .

HOW TO TELL THE AGE OFSHEEP. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

HOW TO TELL THE AGE. OF SHEEP. The age of sheep, as that of horses and cattle, is most easily. learned by inspection of the teeth. Sheep have no incisor or front teeth in the upper jaw, the prehensile part of which consists of a hard cartilaginous pad. It should he remembered that the condition s of the teeth depends to some extent upon the conditio.n of the animal and the kind of feed it has „ been receiving. .Sheep , in their life time have two sets .of teeth—temper ary and permanent. For our purpose it will only be necessary to deal with the latter. These are larger, stronger and usually yellower colored, than the temporary teeth. The front or incis or teeth are those by .which the age is determined. In general, the ap pearance of the first large pair of in cisors (one year) indicates that the I animal is from fourteen to sixteen jy months of age. The first pair of in-- / i cisors are situated side by side in the front centre of the lower jaw. The appearance of the second pair of...

The Oldest of Human Arts. (Written for the Show Supplement.) [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

The Oldest of Human Arts. (Written for . the Show Supplement.) Although Australia should suffer the least of the British dominions by the great world war now proceeding, yet the evil effects of the terrible strife are sufficient to emphasise the fact that agriculture, the oldest of human arts, is the backbone of na tional prosperity. The millions of troops in the field would fare" bad (y were it not for the produce grown by the farmers of the newer coun . tries. Great Britain claims to be the greatest manufacturing and mercan tile nation in the world, but agricul ture is admittedly her most import ant industry. At the present time she must look to other countries to supplement her food supply, and Aus tralia, providing that the ocean route is kept open, will play no small part in that task. Australia, young as she is in national life, occupies no mean position in respect to agricultural de velopment. It is not so many years ago when the land of the Southern Cross was regarded by the...

THE VALUE OF AYRSHIRES. [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

THE VALUE OF AYRSHIRES. Mr. W. J. Jenkins, "Fair View," Canterbury, New Zealand, gives his opinion as follows:— "Twenty years' experience of Ayr shire cattle has convinced me that they are the most profitable cattle to keep. In the first place, a cow is only machine kept to collect a pro duct from the land, and to convert that product into a commercial value, and, as with any other machine, the main point is to get the work done as easily as possible. We have found that it is not always the strongest and heaviest machine that does the work the most satisfactorily. You would not think of putting a Shire horse into your gig to run to town. You would take a horse not half the weight. So it is with the cow. The difference between a cow of 80(hb. weight and another of 15001b. weight kept to do the same amount of work is very considerable in many ways. Look how much more grass she spoils by trampling alone, saying nothing of what she requires to keep her up. Now, we will suppose that an A...

Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Murchison Advertiser and Murchison, Toolamba, Mooroopna and Dargalong Express — 18 September 1914

B^ff* (p MOTOR DRIVING Q RUNNING REPAIR MAY MEAN FROM £3 to £5 A WEEK TO YOU. ' ' We make you thoroughly competent in from-14 to 20 days; proficiency and license guaranteed. DAILY LESSONS GIVEN. PUPILS HELPED TO SECURE GOOD POSITIOf .. f -fr (Complete Driving and Mechanical Course costs only £4 4/-.). • - ~ EVENING LESSONS ARRANGED. CALL apd "see for. yourself. WRITE for full prospectus. . GAUDIN MOTOR-WORKS 193 199 STREET

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