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Title: Gippsland Mercury Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 32,835 items from Gippsland Mercury, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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DUCK FARMING. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

DUCK FARMING. The following pointers on ducks and duck-breeding should be observed: There have been many failures in duck-farmirg, but the .esence of the cause is in the man. The theJry that Pouti!-raising fsr. nishes a nice occupation for little boys and girls, old men and women, and in valids, has long since been exploded. There is no more co!--inuous work of a light nature than poultry-farm. ing, but you will g .e wcil repaid for your work. There is a good deal of money in poultry-raising, 'but i* ;kes a ig lift to get it out. A poultry-raiser wilI never suffr through want of exercis,.: i, is a good medicine for health. Ducks waste rapidly when in tran sit, but their recuperativ:' powers are equally wonderful. Free range is unnecessary for duck yards; 25ft. x 10ft., well grassed, will carry 50 ducks. Duck-yards should be laid out so that they can be cultivated. It is a double -benefit in healtihier stock and better results, also rich crops. The habit of scaldiui ducks or any othe...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE VALUE OF BEESWAX. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

THE VALUE OF BEESWAX. Beeswax is gradually going up in price. !The bar-frame sy' :n of keep ing bees has largely ;o answer for this. Under the old szy:e. to obtain the honey, the combs were destroyed; that meant that there was always a certain quantity of wax to be placed on the market. Under the old regime. beekeepers never required the wax; .but, under the new. nearly every grain is carefully husbanded. for the purpose of converting ir into founda* tion comb. As the new system of kteekeeping extends the less wax there will be in proportion to put to com mercial use. Neverrtheess, the de mand for wax is steadi;y on the in; crease. It, therefore, becomes the question: Will the production of wax pay? There are localities where the honey is of an inferior quality: in fact, almost unsaleable at any price. Ts it not worth while in those locali ies to try the experiment of wax pro 'duction? Bees can be compelled to produce more wax than they need. and the supply of wax will a'lays iind a...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FISHERMAN AT HOME. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

THE FISHERMAN AT HOME. Dear father took a fishing trip. He has rheumatic pains And various symptoms of the grip. He never once complains. For life at present seems to hold All joy that he could wish. He nearly caught a fish. He doesn't mind a little cold. He tells about it -while we stand And stare with wondering eyes. It nearly chewed off father's hand, So fearful was its size. It winked at him and tried to sing, And waved a fin in play. It did a hornpipe and a fling And then it swam away. In museums I have stood around And viewed the monsters o'er, Which in the ages past were found Disporting near the shore. These curious creatures are for me With scant importance fraught; But, oh, the fish I long to see That father nearly caught!

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Explanation. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

The Explanation. "Fares, please." the collector said. and the woman handed him one ticket. "Boy will have to pay, too, madam,' said the collector. "Oh." but he's only three years old." she replied. "Looks mighty old to be only three years old," snapped the collector. "Yes. he does; but, you see, he has been doing a lot of worrying," she an swered. "Caseell's Magazine of Fiction" and general literature for March is an ex cellent number. The names of the au thors will ensure it a hearty welcome, for this month H. G. Wells contributes and article, and Olive Wadsley, Wal ter Wood. Captain Shaw, Andrew Soutar, and a host of other writers send stories. Humor, illustrations, feminine pages, and a long complete novel add further attractions.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GREASY HEELS IN HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

GREASY HEELS IN HORSES. By G. Heslop, B.V.Sc., in the "Journal of Agriculture." Grease is a term used to denote a diseasce condition of the skin and subcutaneous tissues situated at the back of the fetlock joint. It is char acterised Iby the production of vesi cles and pustules, which exude a par ticularly evil-smelling greasy dis charge, and which, as the disease pro gresses, brings about the formation of numerous wart-like excrescences, commonly referred to as "grapes." This condition of "grapes" is similar to that produced in a wound where there is an excess of granulation tis sue (proud flesh). The tissue has a pleniiful 'blood supply, and if injured bleeds freely. It thus acts as an irri tant, retarding healing, and assists in the continuance of the disease by forming ridges and furrows over the affected surface, in which greasy dis charges accumulate. Grease can be divided into two stages: (1) Where there is a formation of vesicles -followed by pustules, which finally rupture ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PORTRAIT OF A GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

PORTRAIT OF A GIRL, About whose proud and famous name, this day, Are you adream? Your silken lashes seem Heavy with secrets your red lips would say: Around your placid brow what rever ies play Their Merlin tune, In this light-hearted noon Of girlhood, with its green anl golden May? Within your gentle, rosy-finger hands, Where lilies sleep, Great destinies you keep-' Thrice happy he who kneels to your commands! From that gold disarray, your crown, what strands Shall gleam anew Some distant day, when you Wrap round a smaller head these fillet bands! What though the stealthy years e, croach, you'll wait With your slow smile, A brief, imperious while, Dreaming white dreams till Love smiles from the gate Then, in the darkling years, may kindly Fate This solace lend My dim eyes, and forfend That gracious, gradual end to youth's estate W. G. Tinckom-Fernandez in Febru ary "Smart Set."

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"LOOKING BRONZED AND WELL" [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

"LOOKING BRONZED AND WELL" The expression, "looking bronzed and well," is a favorite one with re porters, yet, as a doctor has recently said in one of the medical journals, a face browned by sun and sea breezes is not a sign of health, and "looking well, although bronzed," might be nearer the mark. Sunburn, says this specialist, is simply the ef fect of the active rays of light-a au perficial scorching of the outer skin if it goes too far, it has a destructive effect. In fact, sunburnt people are suffering from a slight attack of der matitis! Perhaps the reason why people on their holidays often suffer so acutely from the bites of mosaul toes and gnats is because dermatitis, or scaling of the skin, facilitates the entrance of poison into the skin. Just as many of the unemployed are unemployable, most of the 1un loved are unlovable.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Looking for Sympathy. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

Looking for Sympathy. The lawyer was drawing up old Fur row's will. "I hereby bequeath all my pro per ty to my wife," dictated the son of the soil. "Got that?" "Yes," answered the lawyer. "On condition that she marries again within a year." The legal light sat back puzzled. 'But why?" he asked. The aged farmer smiled. "Because," was the reply, "I want somebody to be sorry I died!"

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A VICTORIOUS VENTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

A VICTORIOUS VENTURE. I By John Rankine. It was a spring twilight. Lord Eric Norbeck stood gazing over Croxton Woods. They were his. But they could not long remain so. "I shall certainly lose them," he mut tered. "I can retain if I wish. But at what a price! Should I pay it?" The sound of a light step reached" his ear.' He turned to look at the passer-by. His face lit up as he re cognised her. "An -unexpected pleasure, Miss Ath erton. It is rarely you travel this road so late and alone." "My cousin Mildred wished to see a fashion journal. I travelled over to Stratebury to fetch it." "A three-mile walk to gratify a whim. The means seem out of pro portion to the end." "The -walk has been pleasant. Crox ton Woods are lovely in their spring freshness. I have just cbeen admiring their beauty." "That is what I was doing when you approached.. Croxton Woods are the most familiar thing in my life. It would be a great wrench for me to forsake them." "Surely you are not thinking of do ing so?"...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

STATE SAVINGS BANK OF VICTORIA grants LOANS ON EASY TERMS. up to three fifths of valuation. ON BROAD ACRES .. : .... . .. .. ...... £ 000 to £25000 ON TOWN PROPERTIES ...... .. .. .... £500 to £25000 for a term of 3 or 5 years with option of paying off a portion on any pay day. Interest 5 per cent. CREDIT FONCIER LOANS up to two thirds of valuation. ON FARMS .. .. ...... .. .. ........ .... .. £50 to £2000. Repayable by Instalments spread over 30 years, with interest at 5 per cent. Security may be either Freehold, or Crown Leasehold that could be made Freehold at any time on payment of the balance of -Crown Rents. Loans may be granted for the purpose of purchasing the land taken as security, or paying off existing liabilities thereon, paying Crown Rents, improving, developing, or carrying on the farm, purchasing stock, machinery, etc. ON COTTAGES, VILLAS and SHOPS .. ........ £50 to £1000. Repayable by Instalments spread over 19% years, with Interest at 5 per cent. No Charge for Mor...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DEAR OLD FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

THE DEAR OLD FARM. I remember. I remember, the house where I was born; The gaps between the siding where the sun came in at morn; The nail-heads that in winter wore a crown of silver frost, The small old-fashioned window-panes by the same hand embossed. I remember, I remember, the stove pipe through the floor; The kitchen stove that, always fed, was always wanting more; The coal I used to carry, the wood I had to get; The boots that stuck so tightly when 1 used to get them wet. i reemmber. I remember, the grind stone where I ground Some forty million sickles-how I turned it round and round Till at last I felt like dropping-asked if we were not most through Learned that we were nearly finished; just another hour or two. I remember, I remember, how those summer nights would speed; I-low I thought that I could never get the sleep I seemed to need; I recall the voice that w ke me when the dear old clock struck four, And the ever-ready bootjack that hung up behind the door. I remember, I...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Great Montamor Case. CHAPTER XXIII. Galling Bonds. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

y~s----- ~~~ io GMeat Montamor By ALICE M. DIEHL, AuthoroS of "The Knave of Hearts," CHAPTER XXIII. Galling Bonds. Strangely enough, when her belov d, the betrothed husband whose marri ae with her at the rural parish church had been roughly interrupted by the woman of whomi he said, "I married y cous"in Gwendolen-she ni. m wife," Netta was relieved, con soled, rather than overwhelmed. In these crises of life, memory is as vividly awakened as all the other mental faculties. Netta remembered that for fifteen long years her Robert had been dead to his old surround in.s and every human soul they en vironed. She recollected that so long a desertion of any wife would go far to break the tie in the case of any man. She reasoned, in a flash, that all was not lost. The law might help her-and her beloved. "But supposing you did marry her, dearest, you deserted her! If she chooses, she can set you free-at ease, I understood the marriage laws freed a woman from a husband who 1ad deserted her on...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Past and Future. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

Past and Future. "\Well, how are you to-day';' asked the physician cheerfully to the society leader. "\\'eli. doctor," she replied, "the cold I caught Tuesday is a little bet ter. thanks to your prescription. But the one I caught Thursday is much worse. The thing I called to see you for. however, is tile severe cold I caught last n ight." The doctor sat down and wrote a long line of hieroglyphics. "lere." he said, "is something for the one you will catch this evening with that \'-neck and those skimpy skirts. Good afternoon."

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WRITTEN IN RINKLES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

WRITTEN IN RINKLES. Nothing is more damaging to beauty in woman than worry. The worrying woman invites the hand of time to write plenty of wrinkles on her brow, and round her eyes and mouth; to tint her face yellow, and give dullness to the eye that no artifice can brighten. Worrying, moreover, is quite unneces sary. antid is a total waste of energy which could be employed in doing something useful. Everyone knows the worrying woman the moment they see her. Her character is written in her face in wrinkles which apparently nothing short of a miracle could ob literate.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WRECKERS OF MEN AND NATIONS. The Smile and the Wile of Woman. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

WRECKERS OF MEN AND NATIONS. The Smile and the Wile of Woman. Empires have fallen before the wiles of woman. Rome sang of the achievements of Antony. Antony look ed into the eyes of Cleopatra and laid down honor and life. Louis XV. dallied with the Pompa dour and Du Barry until his kingdom tottered. The royal roue died and left his grandson and heir a heritage of death. .Mary Stuart played at love with many men until she lost her throne and at last her head. These women have been the lure that led men to destruction. They baffled scientists and sociologists. By all the rules of the game they should have been wholly creatures of evil. Some were, Ibut that others of them were warm-hemrted, impulsive and be witching to good and bad people alike is a puzzle to alienists. When face to face with the lives of these wreckers of the world, scientists hold up their hands, shake their heads and say: "'We cannot tell you about it-may be some day we can, but not now; it is too much to expect us ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MANURES FOR WHEAT. ALL THE PROFITS. HOW TO GET THEM. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

MANURES FOR WHEAT. ---- ALL THE PROFITS. HOW TO GET THEM. By A. H. Renard. Expert in Modern Agriculture. Author ot "A.B.C. of Rational Manur ing" and "A.B.C. of Scientific Stock Feeding." Every farmer is interested in get ting the largest income in the year and in getting it with the minimum of worry and anxiety. *To make money it is necessary to spend money, as every farmer knows. Something of value cannot be got for nothing in these modern times. Every farmer has certain unavoidable expenses to meet-cost of seed,. fallowing, inter est on value of land, living expenses, cost of labor, etc.-and he has to get his return from a limited area of land within a limited time. Let him com mit to memory the following axioms of successful manuring of wheat and work in close accord with their teach ings; then everything will go right with him. Wheat Manuring Axioms. 1. Citrate soluble phosphate is the only natural form of soluble and rvailable phosphoric acid. 2. Phosphoric acid extracted by t...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORK THE SOIL NOW. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

WORK THE SOIL NOW. All orchard soils should be kept well worked during the summer mouths. It is very essential that these should have an abundant supply of moisture during the whole of the growing season. The transpiration from fruit and foliage is considorabl'> at any time but during the hot and windy weather the amount of nmois ture which is required by a tree. :and which is ultimately transpired from the tree, is very exceptional. Excessive transpiration is often the cause of loss of young trees anul of now grafts. They are found to part with a large amount of moisture. :: i are not able to retain or obtain st:f ficient for their nourislhment: they then very soon wither and die. The soil v.round these should be kept \\ell stirred, they should also be give!: a good straw mulch.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE RECENT STORMS. Traralgon, Friday. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

THE RECENT STORMS, Traralgon, Friday. The long dry spell in this district is effectually broken. uGood showers have fallen at intervals during the week, and last night 25 points fell. Tu-day there was heavy rain. Grass is shooting al ready, and before winter sets in the burnlt paddocks will be covered with new grass. In the hill country the rain fall for the past few days is quite two inches. Though the bush tires in the hills have dune a good deal of damage in burning grass, fenlcing, and in some cases settlers' homes, they have also destroyed an imnmense amount of rub bish. One settler decl;,res that it wotuld have taken hinl!l " years to have donie so much clearing. lie says that bltuegunm logs were burnt up like ci gars. A mltixture of dwarf Essex rape and rye-grass seed, sown ill the ashes a few days ago. is already above the ground. Those settlers who have sown will soon have good feed for their stock. At present very few properties are secure frotl wanlldering stock, and a lo...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Grown-Up Children. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

Grown-Up Children. A railway guard related an amusing little incident the other day. "'At an out-of-the-way little station in the North," he said. "a party of working men -wished to book to a town in the Midlands. Unfortunately. the booking clerk had only a limited number of tickets for that journey at his disposal. "Eventually he got out of his difli culty by dividing the pieces of paste board and issuing children's tickets to the party, at the same time explaining to me how matters stood. "'They've paid the full fare. of courtc.' he renmarked. 'so you must see 'em ithrough.' "I had almost forgotten the matter, when a ticket-examiner at B- came to me and remarked, with a sorrowful shake of the head: "'This under-age dodge is getting too warm!' "'What's the matter?' I asked. "'Matter?' he echoed, disgnustedly. 'Why. here's a whole carriage full o' children wet plays cards, drinks whis ky. and wears whiskers!' " A New Zealand man has had the sanme overcoat for thirty-four years. But ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RAINFALL AS REGISTERED AT "THE GIPPSLAND MERCURY" OFFICE, SALE. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 3 April 1914

RAINFALL AS REGISTERED AT "THE CIPPSLAND MERCURY" OFFICE, SALE. rI .- - ..... - , -, . Year. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May JI nc -,, . ,ý,;. , t ;-. ' Dec. YIcar. 1887 1.58 3.93 9 2.39 2.99 0.6:' .2W 3.40 1.ul 1.89!! 2.31 5-.12 2.0 30.62 1888 4.63 1.15 4.001 0.62 1.04 1.13 0.72 1.03 1.3i 1.44 1.47 2.95 22.14 1889 2.44 2.54 0.38 2.77 3.16 9.25 0.87 0.91 2.4 j 2.47 3.37 1.10 24.70 1890 1.99 2.5 1. 13 2.9 4.7 1.65 1.72 1.33 3.45 3.06 2.63 28.52 1891 2.2 0.50 0. 3.51 1.2 5.17 3.4 4. 2.42 2.2 3.6 1.5 3113 1892 .. 2.47 0.10 1.1 1.61 0.73 1.01 1.29 3.72 4.22 3.77 1.86 24.16 1893 . 2.54 0.38 2.09) 3.6i3 3.11 1.38 2.48 0.70 2.87 2.06 3.52 4.92 29.59 1894 .. 1.19 0.66 . 2.60 0.49 .- 2.71125 2.17 2.37 0.69 2.34 20.8 1895 1.01 0.67 2.16 1.071 0. 1.4-B 1.l5 3.63 3.04 0.46 0.04 4.21 19.48 1896 0.91 3.06 1.16 1.77)1 .24 5.2;6 0.90 3.29 2.80j 1.19 1.62 1.14 24.64 1897 .. 4.57 7.72 1.40 0.72 3.67 0.72 1.7'' 4.34 2.10' 1.79 0.93 0.50 30.18 1898 .. 0.50' 2.561 0.95 0.31 4.86 1.09 1.0'4 1.2 2.57 1.823 2.41 0...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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