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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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COULD-BE EDISONS. Plenty of Things to Invent. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

COULD-BE EDISONS. Plenty of Things to Invent. The world is full of would-be Edi 30ns, and the point we want to bring out is that quite a lot of them are could-be Edisons. A man invented the stocking-frame for weaving silk stockings. He got .he idea while he sat watching his wife work. But surely he wasn't tlie first man who sat and watched his wife work? There is a huge fortune for the nan who can commercialise weeds. The raw material is inexhaustible!, for it renews itself automatically every year. It might pay a reader in the paper-making trade to follow up this idea. • Then we want a paint that will last' as long as the material upon which it • is placed, and an iron that will not rust. We want something th?it will counteract the wearing effect of the atmosphere. It's going to be in vented some day, and it may as well be done now, and you who read this may as well be the person to do it. In some remote corner of the earth to-day a could-be Edison may be ex perimenting with the po...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CEMETERY HUMOR AND GRAVEYARD GRINS. Curing the Parson's Gout. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

CEMETERY HUMOR- AND GRAVE- j YARD GRINS. J Curing the Parson's Gout. There is a story to the effect that a certain editor once printed some verses with the following introduc tion: "The poem published this week was composed by an esteemed friend who has lain in his grave for many years for his own amusement." The humor associated with grave yards, however, is not usually of the intentional and deliberate kind. More often than not it is the result of some quaint incident. Take, for instance, the amusing yarn of two boys who, after nut-gathering, had repaired to a cemetery to divide their harvest. In getting over the wall they acciden tally dropped, two of the nuts on the road outside, and left them there to be dealt with later. Then, seating themselves, they commenced to divide. A negro who happened to pass that way heard voices inside the wall, and, listening closely, he detected the words, "One for you and one for me," being repeated several times. Startled almost out of.his senses...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

I m mreakdewe I Mr. Po R. MILES, a well-known Interstate Traveller, =■:■. :. ' .' REPRESENTING ■ --.'.^T^ ONE OF TI-IE .'.LARGEST .COMMERCIAL .••••? V"'.. FIRMS IN AUSTRALASIA, WRITES A REMARKABLE LETTER TO CLEMENTS TONIC LTD., IN WHICH HE DRAWS THE PUBLIC ATTENTION TO HIS WONDERFUL RECOVERY TO HEALTH AFTER ALL MEDI CINES FAILED HIM. MR. MILES'EMPHATICALLY DECLARES HE CONSIDERS THIS TONIC THE GREATEST IN THE WORLD. BECAUSE HE KNOWS WHAT IT DID FOR HIM AND FOFi HIS SYDNEY FRIEND WHO ADVISED HIM TO TAKE IT. AND WHOM IT CURED OF RHEUMATISM AFTER HE HAD BEEN CON- ' SIDERED INCURABLE. READ THIS LETTER—IT IS GOOD READING FOR THOSE WHO DESIRE TO REGAIN HEALTH. C!LiE!V3EMTS TOM5C Commercial Travellers' Club. Moore St., Sydney. 3/4/13, E.TD.. , ''For years I suffered from CHRONIC INDIGESTION anrl DEBILITY. -and, as my profession is one involving very strenuous duiics in (lie interests of one of the largest international firm3 represented in Australia, at :imes I found it \try difficult, on a...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Call to the Colors! RECRUITS WANTED. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

EE0EFIT3 WANTED. Victoria requires an average of 80 re cruits d.-rily to reinforce Victorians at" the front. Minimum height ... 5 feet 2 inches Age ... ... 18 to 43 years Chest measurement (Fully expanded) ... 33 inches Persons desiring to enlist should, if in the metropolitan area, apply at the recruiting depot at military headquart ers, and'if in other localities at the near est town hnllt shire hall, drill hall, or re cruiting depot, where arrangements will be. made for medical examination. Free railway tickets to the metropolis will be granted after medical examina tion. Rates of Pay per Day. After Embarkation Before (including Embarkation. deferred pay). Lieutenant ... 18s Gi 21s Sergeant ... 10s 10s Gd Corporal ... 9s 10s Private ... 5s Gs Separation Allowance. Separation allowance will be paid to married men who are receiving less than 8s per day, but such allowance will not exceed tha amount necessary to make up the difference between their daily rate of pay and 8s per day. ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GAS ROLLS BACK ON FOE "STRAFE THE WIND." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

GAS ROLLS BACK ON FOE "STRAFE THE WIND." I "There is a grim humor in a story which comes from Petrograd. Three thousand Germans, preceded by the usual asphyxiating cloud, and with the wind nicely behind them, advanced gaily to storm a fort at Ossoviecs. Then suddenly the wind changed; the gas rolled back upon the advancing ! host, and the filthy cloud, combined with the enemy's guns, practically an nihilated the column, and of three thousand left but three. The wind can be a dangerous ally."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A PERSISTENT SQUATTER SEEKS TO AVENGE BROTHER'S DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

A PERSISTENT SQUATTER 'SEEKS TO AVENGE BROTHER'S DEATH. A Tenterfield (.N.S.W.) squatter, Mr. A. L." Jeffrey, may be awarded a, prize for persistence. Having been rejected as a soldier because of .eye-, sight defects, he determined to "get there" somehow. He sold his 40,000 sheep, leased his station, settled a competency on his wife and two chil dren, and handed himself and his motor-car to the British Red Cross Society. He paid the cost of making the car an ambulance, all his own expenses and the expenses of a friend to act as a second driver. It was his brother Norman who slipped into a Light Horse Regiment by purchas ing a sick soldier's outfit, name and papers on the day of embarkation. The price of Norman Jeffrey's pa triotism was his life.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Irish of It. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

The Irish of It. They were sitting arouna tne .iam ily tea-table—little Nora, Mary and Margaret, and their parents. The conversation turned on the Irish lan guage, and little Nora asked her papa what her name was in Irish. "Noreen," said her papa. j "And what is mine?" said Mary. "Maureen," said papa. "And what is mine?" said Maggie. "Oh," said papa, "I don't know what yours is.'.' "Well," said she, "if Nora is Nor-~ j een, and Mary is Maureen, why, I [must be Margarine." i Mother. "Yes, little Arthur here has I quite made up his mind to become a minister. Now tell the pastor why: you want to be a clergyman/' Arthur: ".'Cos it's so tiresome sit ting down in the church and listening. I want to stand up in the pulpit and holler!" A youth went forth to serenade The lady he loved best, And. by her house at evening, •When the sun had gone to rest,. He -war-blgd .until daylight, And woulfi warbled more— But morning light $spi.os£«J .the sign "To Let" upon the door. ' !

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What It Was For. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

Whatx It Was For. Smith keeps a savage dog on hi? I premises, and near its k,ennel a board is displayed with the warning in large letters: "BEWARE OP THE DOG." "I suppose," said Jones, pointing to the warning, "that you have painted that sign in large letters so that he who runs may read?" "No," replied Smith, "but that he who reads may run." .

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A ROMANCE OF THE PENINSULAR WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

A ROMANCE OF THE PENINSULAR WAR. On April 9, 1812, two officers of the ">Stii Rifles were strolling in the camp of the Light Division. The breach of Badajoz had been stormed two nights before; but the orgie of riot and pil lage had scarcely yet ceased within the hardly-won city. As Captain Kincaid and his friend advanced towards the walls they saw two young ladies advancing to meet them. The elder, accosting the cap tain, told him she was the wife (pos sibly the widow, for aught she knew; of a Spanish officer serving far away. Her house had been burnt and sack ed by the troops, and she was with out a home or food. She and her sis ter—the girl who stood by her side, had been attacked and robbed, their bleeding ears still witnessing how their jewellery had been brutally torn from their persons. Badajoz was un safe for any decent woman, and she had determined to throw herself on the generous protection of the first English officer she could find. Lord Pitzroy Somerset and Colonel Ca...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HONEYMOON AT THE WAR BRAVE RUSSIAN PRINCESS. Fights Beside New Husband. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

HONEYMOON AT.THE WAR BRAVE RUSSIAN PRINCESS. Fights Beside New Husband. A story with a plot which would have led to its prompt rejection by the editor of a fiction magazine a year ago on the familiar ground of "inherent improbability," is told re garding Princess Marie Slobodka, daughter of a great Russian noble of the Caucasus. She was travelling alone from Mos cow to Warsaw. Why she was travel ing alone is hot known, because the Russian Attache who told the story did not know himself. On the train was a student from Moscow Univer sity, Michael Angelotf. He was only 19, but he had volun teered when war came, had- just re ceived his commission, and was on his way to join his regiment in the trenches. Arriving at Warsaw, the couple proceeded to the nearest Or thodox Greek Church, where they were married. Now came the surprise of this happy union. The next day the bridegroom pre pared to bid his bride' farewell, but this was not necessary, for the brave bride in the meantime appeared ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOUSEHOLD. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

THE HOUSEHOLD. Small Mutton Pies.—Mince a quar ter of a. pound, of beef suet, then melt it in a pan, and when it toils pour in half 3. pint of milk. Allow this to come to boiling-point and then strain through a hair sieve on one pound pf flour, with ft little salt. Work the mixture to a smootii dougli and di vide into seven parts—keep one aside for the lids; shape these into rounds about three inches high, and form them into pie shape. Some peo ple do this around the bottom of a jar. Take some mutton cut into pieces—some people like the meat minced—season it with pepper and salt, and fill it into the pies, adding /a little gravy; cover with lids or pastry, wetting the edges to make them stick, and make two holes in each to let out the steam. Cook in a quick oven. Stew for the Children.—Put one pound of flank of lean mutton into a stewpan with two sliced onions. Brown nicely and pour in two pints of boiling water. Cover and stew gently for two hours; add one tea cupful of rice and a ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WAR-ORDER MANIA FRENZIED AMERICAN CAPITALISTS. MANUFACTURE OF MUNITIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

WAR-ORDER MANIA | FRENZIED AMERICAN CAPITALISTS. MANUFACTURE OF MUNITIONS. (By a War. Broker in "Saturday's Journal.") The attention of the world seems concentrated on the question of American war munitions for the Al lies. I think it is a vital issue, for the course and duration of the war turn on it I think it is about as great a strain getting the munitions made, sold, and shipped as using them in the fighting. Our activities attract some unde sirable attention from German spies, whose activities seem to increase. Whether in Government service or volunteers we don't know—or care. Factories are policed and our princi pal offices guarded, and since the at tack on Mr. Morgan we have all plac ed loaded revolvers handy in our desks. Since I threw my energies Into selling war materials to. the Allies I have not had one day's rest, dined out, attended a single theatre, read any books, been in the country or to the seashore. The greatest adven ture of my life—and I've lived active ly—is ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER II. The Sick-Room. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

CHAPTER II. The Sick-.RoQm. Card-crescent, as its name signi fies, consisted of half-a-dozen queer little houses built in a curve like a how, and the. straight line of very modern mansions opposite might be taken for the string of that same bow. The square, red-brick dwellings ■were of Georgian design, with red brick steps leading down from each green-painted door on to a qofeblft stotie arc, at t^e foot of which stretched the smooth wooden blocks of the street. It was quite a mingling of the old and the new, as not only the houses themselyes, but the cob ble-stone arc and the wooden pave ment typified markedly the eight eenth and twentieth centuries. A painted chariot might have stood be fore the Crescent Mansions, while a I motor-car might have whirred along the street, so closely did the two epochs jostle one another. The somewhat odd name of this antique place had been given to it by the original proprietor, wh.o had built the houses out of the proceeds of a lucky night at the c...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NAMED AFTER WELLINGTON. Every English-Speaking Country Has a Place Named Wellington or Waterloo. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

NAMED AFTER WELLINGTON. Every English-Speaking Country Has a Place Named Wellington or Waterloo. The number of places, towns, coun tries, villages, streets, and so on, named after Wellington and Waterloo is legion. In London alane there are five Waterloo roads or places, as well as Waterloo-bridge, a Wellesley road and street, and thirteen Wel lington squares, streets and roads, to say nothing of several dozen Duke of Wellington public-houses! • Scattered over the world, in practi cally every country where English is spoken, the great battle and its vic tor of a hundred years ago are com memorated. Canada has a number of towns as well as a county called Waterloo. One of the Waterloos, In Ontario, js : curiously enough, two miles from another town called Berlin!' South Australia, New South Wales, and Victoria, in Australia, all have their Waterloos, and one of the suburbs in the town of Sydney is a Waterloo. New South Wales, too, can boast of a Wellington county and town. ] The bigge...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE SERBIAN NATIONAL ANTHEM. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

THE SERBIAN NATIONAL ANTHEM. God of Justice! Tliou Who saved us When in deepest bondage cast, Hear Thy Serbian children's voices, Be our help as in the past. With Thy miglity hand sustain us, Still our rugged pathway trace; God, our Hope, protect and cherish Serbian crown and Serbian race! Bind in closest links our kindred, Teach the love that will not fail, May the loathed field of discord Never in our ranks prevail. Let the golden fruits of union Our young tree of freedom grace; God, our Master, guide and prosper Serbian crown and Serbian race! On our sepulchre of ages Breaks the resurrection morn, From the slough of direst slavery Serbia anew is born. Through five hundred years of dur ance We have knelt before Thy face, All our kin, 0 God, deliver! Thus entreats the Serbian race.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AGRICULTURE. BENEFITS OF HARROWING. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

I AGRICULTURE. I —_ BENEFITS OF HARROWING. A considerable amount of labor can be saved by the judicial use of the drag harrow. It is one of the most valuable implements for killing seed ling weeds in the spring. In harrow ing, it is essential to perform the work at the right moment to obtain the best results. It is useless commencing it before the weed seeds have germin ated, and it cannot be carried out to full advantage if the weeds are allow ed sufficient time to get well rooted. The proper time to "hustle" with the harrow is when the weeds have just appeared. This may be before or after the crop has come through, and as the correct period onlj lasts a few days delay is dangerous. If possible a warm, dry day should be chosen. As the weeds are displaced by the harrow they will be killed by the sun. Some farmers, especially those who have not had previous experience, are apt to think that the harrow will have a prejudicial effect on the crop if used when it has made its appearance ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Pressing Wants. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

Pressing Wants. A German prisoner of war said to one of the sentries at an internment camp: "There is a great difference be tween you and the German soldier. You fight for money; he fights for honor." "I know—we for money, you for honor," the . sentry responded. "We are both fighting for what we haven't got, and what we most need!" A man of an inquiring turn of mind thrust his finger into a horse's mouth to see how many teeth it had, and the horse closed its mouth to see how many fingers the man had. The* curiosity of each was fully satisfied.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
An Adulterated Compliment. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

An Adulterated Compliment. The business girl had made good, and got promotion, and Mr. X., the veteran head of the firm, delivered to her an initiatory homily on the morn ing when her new duties commenced. Shortly afterwards the junior partner discovered her looking very solemn. "Headache?" he asked. "No, I was thinking. Your father was very nice indeed, and I felt as if I could start right away and work won ders. Just at the end he mentioned that sometimes I would have to en gage beginners." "Yes," said Mr. X., "that is so. Well?" "He said, 'You may take it as a safe rule when engaging girls that the p^ain ones are the best. The others get married just when they might be becoming useful. Also, beauty and capability' in women don't go to gether." "You seej' continued the business girl after a pause, during which Mr. X., Jun., kept silence, "you see I can't forget the fact that when I first came here it was your father who engaged me, and it is he who has now promot ed me." Mr. X., J...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Old Lintonians. THIRD ANNUAL REUNION. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 November 1915

THIRD ANNUAL REUNION. Owing to the very inconvenient train service that we now have at Linton, it was not expected that a very large num ber of Old Lintonians would be able to join in the annual reunion this year, and therefore it was an agreeable surprise when quite a respectable gathering ap peared on the Recreation Reserve on Saturday afternoon. Many had arrived the day before, and bad had time to have a good look round at the old place, which no°doubt revived many memories and brightened up mental pictures of scenes that had faded into the dim and dis tant past. The committee had provided an en joyable luncheon in the refreshment room, to which the Old Lintonians did justice, to the accompaniment of a buzz of conversation, the talk being not the least pleasant feature. The walls were profusely decorated with patriotic colors and flags for the occasion. The ladies of the Linton committee were assiduous in seeing that everyone was generously en tertained, and the president (Mr R. ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SMYTHESDALE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 4 December 1915

SMYTH ESDALE. The quarterly meeting of the mana gers of the common was held on Mon day evening ; Mr M'Menamin presiding. The Secretary reported that 110 cattle, 32 horses, and 5 goats had been regis tered for. the quarter ending January, and the fees collected amounted to £8 9s 6d. Accounts amounting to £7 lis 8d were passed for payment. It was resolved to call aVpublic meeting to elect three managers for the Boss' Creek portion of the common. A meeting lwil also be held at Smythesdale to eect three manager* for the Smythesdale por tion ; and the secretary was instructed to advertise same.. It,was "resolved to hold future meetings at the Eldorado Hotel. The annual meeting will be .held on 17th January.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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