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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LYNCH LAW. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

LYNCH LAW. That which is called "Lynch Law" in America originated in tho action of private individuals who took into their own hands tho punishment of wrong-doers, without authority. It is stated to have begun in the act of a Virginian farmer, in the seventeenth century, who took upon himself tho punishment of a thiof whom ho had discovered plundering his farm. In stoad of turning him over to tho autho rities, Farmer Lynch tied him to a treo and flogged him. Some historians trace tho origin of Lynch Law to James Fitzstephens Lynch, Mayor and Warden of Galway, Ireland, in 1493. It is stated that Mayor- Lynch hanged his own son for defalcation and for murdering tlio nephew of a man whom ho had defrauded. Tho accused was tried before his father, and con victed, and tho latter acted as execu tioner "to show a good oxamplo to posterity." Tho young man's rela tives tried overy moans to provont tlio execution of tho sentenco by rosorting to various legal tricks and delays, but the father w...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Penalising Smoking. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

Penalising Smoking. Tho earliest instance known in Eng land of penalising 6moking in tho streots 38 in tho court books of tho Mayor of Moth wold, in Norfolk, Tliero is the following entry on tho record of tho Court held on October 14th, 1G95: "Wo agree that any person that is taken smoaking tobacoa in tho streets shall forfitt ono shillingo fo£_ every time so taken, and it shall b« lawfull for tho petty constables to dis traino for tho eamo, for to bo putt to tho uses abovo said (i.e., to the uso' of tho town). Wo present Nicholas Barber for sinoaking in tho streot, and doo amerco him ono shillinge."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE TEACHING OF MODERN LANGUAGES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

THE TEACHINC OF MODERN LANCUACE8. At Columbia University a new course in "Spoken Languages" has been or ganised to eliminate defects in tiro methods of teaching modern languages in the colleges and preparatory schools. Instead of confining the work of the students to grammar and read ing alone, as has been the custom Ujr3 •jeapfl, Si io' liiltfiiOtrtl 111 lliu -now COUTSQ to give the studonts opportunities of speaking and hoaring "spoken lan guages." The course will includo practically all the modern languages, and will bo given under skilled lin guists. First and second yoar courses in English, Gorman, and French will bo offered, and iirst-yoar courses in Spanish, Italian, Modern Hebrew, and Modern Groek. Tho classes will bo limited to twenty studonts, so that all will have ample opportunity for gain ing tho practice desired.' Tho instriic-' tors will carry on a conversation with tho studonts on everyday topics, and all studonts will bo oxpeoted to tako an active part.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Old-Time Food [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

Old-Tlmo F ood The diversity of substances in the catalogue of articles of food is great. The notions of the ancients on the most important subject are worthy of remark. Their taste regarding meat was various. Beef they considered the most substantial food, hence it tonstituted the chief nourishment of their athletes. Camels' and drome daries' flesh was much esteemed, their heels more especially. Donkey flesh was in high ropute. Maecenas, according to Pliny, delighted in it, and the wild ass brought from Africa was compared to venison. In more modern times we find Chancellor Du pret having asses fattened for his table.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RANDOM READINGS. ANTIQUE MODERN INVENTIONS [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

UAN.DOM HEADINGS. I o | ANTIQUE MODERN INVENTIONS j A German paper points out ifiat many so-railed modern inventions are possessed of considerable antiquity. In the matter of submarines it is of inter est to note tliat about 1710, Emanuel Swedenborg, most generally known, perhaps, 011 account of his religious writings, but who was one of the most advanced scientists of his age, pub lished a pamphlet in which he describ ed the construction of a vessel which "can with its whole crew dive be neath the surface of the sea whereso ever it pleaseth, and do great harm to the enemy's fleet." Then, again a flying-machine which was invented in Vienna in 1809, by a watchmaker, Dcgan, had a great many details in common with the aeroplane of to-day. Records state that De gan actually flew with this machine, ■ and that "he did not only rise and fall but actually navigated in the air." Swedenborg, as early as 1710, made up general plans for a flying machinc. He was certain that the power prob lem, ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Bottled Light!" [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

"Bottled Light!" Tho natives of certain parts of the J West Indies and Central America have a very peculiar way_of providing them selves with light. They cotch several specimens of a strange insect called tho "nightlight fly," and, putting thom in a glass bottle with some food, hang tho bottle up, and use it as a lamp. The inBects omit a brilliant green light from the eyes and lower side of the abdomen. About fifty of these Jittlo flies in a bottle givo a light by which it is as easy to read as by the glow from an olectrio bulb. Tho in sects vary in size, the largest being found in Cuba. A peculiar thing about them is that they are affected by sugar as by tho strongost poison. If a night light fly oats sugar, its legs drop off, its light fades, and it dies very quickly.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DROPPED ON. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

DROPPED ON. An ingenious young raim onco took his finnceo to cliurch in a small coun try villago, and when tho timo camo for tho collection iio rathor ostonta tiously displayed a sovereign. Pre suming upon their engagement, tho young woman placed a restraining hand upon tho*arm of hor fiance. "Don't bo so extravagont, George," sho cxclaimcd. "Oh, that's nothing," ho replied, "I always make a point of giving a sovereign when I go to a strange church." Just then tho boadle camo with tho plate, and Georgo dropped a coin. Everything seemed favorable, and tho young man beamed with a sense of generosity. Then tho minister gave out tho notices for tho week, and conclud ed with tho announcement of tho day's collection. "Tho collection for to-day,V said lie, "amounts to ninoteon shillings and sixpence."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The "Handy Han" of the Army. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

The "Handy Han" of ths Army. That tlio Army as well as tho Navy has its "handy mon" is demonstrated in an article on "Military Bridge Build ing" in the "Windsor Magazine." The life of an army in tho field is bocoming more and more a matter of engineer ing. If there are rivers and gaps to bo crossed, tho mon of the Royal En gineers, who are capable of build ing anything needed by tho troops, must bridge thom in advance. Tho pontoon bridge is tho mainstay, so far as bridging rivors is ooncernod, but whoro tho usual materials are not avail able the handy mon can make an effi cient floating bridge on casks or boats, on tarpaulin bags filled with hay, on corked keroscno cans or inflatod ani mal skins. Equally ingenious is their work in constructing foot-bridgos. With military telegraph-poles, planks, wiro an3 ropes, or oven with builders' lad ders lashed together, a 6afo if fragilo bridge can bo mado which will allow the mon to cross in singlo file.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Biggest Clock in the World. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

Tho Biggest Clock in tho World. Very fow people have seen the inside of Big Ben, at Westminster, the biggest clock iu tlio world. Tho apartments where the dials are fixed liavo the credit of being "the hottest places in London" at night, for about a score of gas-jots burn fiercely in the room about 4ft. wide. Tlio hour figures aro 2ft long, and the ininuto spaces 1ft. square. Tho hour hands aro made of gun-inotal, but tho minuto hands aro tubular, and mado of coppor, and aro lift. long. Tho pendulum is just over 13 feet long, and weighs nearly 700 pounds. Tim hour boll, which gives tho clock-tower its popular namo of Big Bon, weighs 13 tons 11 cwt. From first to last Big Bon has cost about £25, 000. Tho clock is wound every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday rtftomoon. Tho winding is very hard work, and lasts sovoral hours, and tho rests which tho windors obtain during tho times of chiming aro gladly wel comed. Tho cloanor finds it a day's work Jto got ono face of tho clock cleaned withi...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
UNTENDERED NAILS ARE GERM TRAPS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

UNTENDEREO NAILS ARE GEriM TRAPS. Q, Being nafoly hidden ovon from our own view the greater part oC tho timo, our toenails give most of tin lc»ss con cern than any othor part of tlio body. A daily soaking in tho bathtub and an occasional hurried clipping—that is all tho attontion thoy havo over ro ceived, and until recently it hrrs boon gonorally supposed it was all thoy do sorvod. But now all this is to bo changed, if wo aro to heed tho warnings of tho National Association of Chiropodists and Dr. Kmil Hoidolbacka, ft distin guished Hungarian physician. Accord ing to thoso authorities, tho toenails, unless carod for with great pains, aro sources of deadly peril. It is claimed that a largo proportion of tho mys terious casos of blood poisoning aro duo to germB which find a lodging placo under tho toenails. "Treat your toenails reverently/' says Dr. Hoidolbacka, with tho hearty endorsement of tho chiropodists. "By so doing you will roduco tho danger of blood-poisoning at least 50 por ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
READY FOR WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

READY FOR WAR. In the Julius Tower of Spandau, a Prussian fortress eight miles from Berlin, a vast quantity of specie and £6,000,000 in gold are stored and hold in reserve, ready for immediate use should Germany go to war. Needless to say, elaborate precau tions are taken to £uard this mass of treasures. The gold coins aro stored in chests, piled one upon another, in rooms, to which access only is possible by passing through three doors, each fitted with several locks. Each of these doors weighs a ton, and is made of stool, with an oak coro; whilst each of the keys is hold by a different Government official, so that it is impossible for any ono of those officials to gain admission to tho tron suro chamber unaccompanied. Is the money ever counted? No, never. The task, of course, would bo almost impossible; but periodically each chest is weighed—and the correct weight, it may be said, is known to tlhe smallost fraction of an ounoo; whilst occasionally tho seals are broken, tho chests ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SURGICAL PATCHWORK. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

SURGICAL PATCHWORK. Modern surgery haa como to tho point of being a fino art. Tlio surgeon of to-day has progressed far beyond tho wildest dreams of tho surgeon of twenty yearB ago. Among tho astounding feats which aro almost daily occurrences in tho groat hospitals axo the grafting of skin from animals or human boings to tako tho placo of skin.. on otlvor. human boings, which Has been lost through burning or disoaso, sowing up wounds in tho heart, which years ago tho surgeon would not have dared to attempt, transplanting artorios and veins from animals into human boings, and robuilding up noses by grafting now bono and flesh orer tho disoasod parts. Tho most wondorful of theso feats was performed on a young man of Quiney, Massachusetts, by Dr. Charles A. Pcrtor, of Havard Medical School. Tho man had his faco, neck and scalp sovoroly burnod. Ho was undor anaesthetics no fowor than 30 times wliilo skin was grafted from other parts of his own body and that of his brothers and othor ne...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY POTTS WAS ANGRY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

WHY POTTS WAS ANGRY. Jolm Pottu, tho rich sugar rolinor, was fuming over Jiis bronkfiuil eggs. "What iB tho matter, John I"' inquir ed lii« wifo. "Mnttor? Why, you know how 1 do tost charity subscriptions, and hftvo nil i my lifo. To think that at my ago, and with' my oxporionoo, I should bo lot in for two guinoan to support aomo charity in more than X con atuhd. l'aea tlio toast." "Tlio othor day ono of thoir repro sontativos callod imd loft two ticlcots At tho oflico for a charity ball to bo givon in tho neighbourhood. It mado mo wild, for tho man know porfectly woll that I had a conscientious objec tion to such tomfoolery. I liavo always said that I htrvo workod for ovory jionny of my, monoy, and oxpoet othor peoplo to do tho samo. Pn9B tho butter. Evoryono knows that I look upon charity ballB and bazaars as advertising shows for hypocritical snobs. It novor ooourrod to mo that anyono was ignor ant of tho fact, ovon tliat typist. So, without a thought, I rang for Eor, handed hor ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE. IColIy was brought into the dock 1 charged, by his wifo, with assaulting ! hor. | Mrs. IColIy, who had given hor bot | tor-half in chargo on tho previous I night, found that hor heart had soft | eneU towards him in tho meantimo. I Consequently, when sho took her stand in tho witness-box sho said sho was unablo to givo ovideneo against him. "nut," protested tho magistrato, "when you gavo your husband in chargo you stated that ho had struck you in tho mouth." "Woll, it's true someone hit mo in tho mouth, your worship. But, on thinking it over, I can't say who it was, for T had my back turned to him at tho time!" If some of the timo spent in crying ovor unliappv people in novels were spent in trying to reliovo tlio miseries of peoplo who actually exist, the world would bo far better tlian it is.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY HE OBJECTED. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

WHY HE OBJECTED. A parson and a lending parishioner wero not on good torms, ami there was : much speculation in tlio villago as to tlio reason. "It's all on account of 0>rson ro fusing to christen master's youngost child," tho housomaid oonfided to hor friend of tho dusting-brush across tho way. "Master wanted hor to bo named Dora Ruby Inez Norah Kathleen, but tho parson wouldn't do it." "It was iiko tho parson's cheok," replied hor friond, "oven if ho was askod to givo tho child a hundred! names." "Oh', it wasn't tho numbor of names that bothered him." roturned tho ser vant. "Ho objected to tho initials, that's all. You seo, mastor's naino is Beer, and tho girl's initials aro D.It.I.N.IC., and parson declined to bo a party to her having to sign herself wlion slio grows up, 'Drink Boor'."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HE LIKED OYSTERS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

HE LIKED OYSTERS. y "When I was in the produce business years ago," said an old merchant, "I had, among my country shippers, a German by the name of Jacob Snyder. He did not often come to the city, but when he did it was a great occasion with him, and he cxpectcd some atten tion. So one morning, when he turned up in my shop about ten o'clock, I said to him:— "Jacob, you must have made an early start to get here so soon. How ■would you like to have a bit of lunch right away? Do you like oysters?" " 'Vy,' he said I could eat a few oysters.' "So we wont round to a neighbour ing: oyster bar, and I ordered two stews. " 'Now, Jacob,' said I 'while we-arc waiting, what do you say to sorfe'thinff' raw ?' " 'Veil,' he replied, T don't mind.' "So we had half a dozen raw apiece, and as the stews had not yet come, we had another half & dozen on the half-shell. "When the stews were despatched, I asked, as a matter of form, if he would not have another, and he said:— " 'Veil, thems pretty...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEW, ODD, INTERESTING [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

| NEW, ODD, INTERESTING In mosk of tho Chilian cities ffomon nro oinj) oycd as trnmenr conductors. About 1000 servants aro mtnehoil to G QeorHo'u ltoyal housoliold Britain owns 150,000 milos of OCO!U1 cablos j Gorinany 10,000 milos. A first-class oeoan steamer roquiros sorvicos Ot about 120 firomon. A New York clubhouse for work people ifl fitted with oloctrio baths. 1 Tiioro aro at least loo specios of oysters known to scientists. Ton men commit miicido to ono woman. Tho ontortainmont of Royalty costs tian society 0ach year fullv £2,000,000. y Smoking is pormitted in prisons in Bolgium as a reward for good bo hirviour. Tho titlo admiral derives its origin from an Arabic word, emir-al-bahr, moaning "lord of tho sea." Jnpaneso men aro among tho host noodle-workers in tho world, thoir only oqual being tho women of Russia. Ono hundred tmd fifty milos a day aro often covered by Laplanders on thoir skatos. Tho world's coffee crop is 800,000 tons, and America drinks one-third of this. _ A...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ALL HE ASKED. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

ALL HE ASKED. Thoy were standing outsido the front door having a final chat after his even ing call. He was leaning against the door post, talking in low, dulcet tones. Sho was listening and gazing up raptuously into his eyes. Suddenly she turned round. The door had opened; and there, just in side, stood her father, clad in a dress ing-gown. "My dear father," she asked, "what is tho matter?" Her dear father ignored lier ques tion. "John," ho said, addressing tho young man, "you know I've never complained about your staying late, and I'm not going to complain now j but, for goodness' sako, stop leaning against tho bull-push'. Otlior people want some sleep, even if you don't."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCIENCE NOTES & NEWS. PREPARING A CRACKED WALL FOR PAINTING OR PAPERING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

SCIENCE NOTES & NEWS. FJIISI'AKING A CRACKED WALL I''OU I'AIKTING OH I'Al'JSUING. When o piaster wall or coiling in so badly cracked that ib will not do to paint or oven paper tho surfaco, cover it with » strong muslin or light can vas. Um» ;i strong pasto mado of Hour in tho ordinary way with a littlo glua addod to givo it stronger holding qual ities. Press out any air bubbles that may occur and nmko tho surfaco quito smooth. Either water or oil colore, as well as paper, may' bo applied to this surfaco, and it will make a very smooth and sure job. I

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REALLY UNKIND. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

REALLY UNKIND. Sam was reading fcho paper, when suddenly he snorted and addressed Mrs. Sam: 4'What tomfoolery, Maria! It says hero that some idiot has actually paid a thousand guineas for a dog!" "Well, my dear, thoso well-bred dogs are worth a lot of money, you know,0 answered his wife. "Yos, of course, I know that! But a thousand guineas! Why, it'#? a good deal more than I am worth myself!" "Ah, yos, Sam! Hut then sow? dogs are worth moro than othors, you sool" Each truth a writer acquires is a lantern, which lu> turns full on what foots and thoughts lio already in liis mind.—Emerson.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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