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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

363 The Indian Advocate. J acquire by prayer and study that knowledge of things divine, j that unbounded charity which is to saintly souls a foretaste of the ineffable bliss and glory that awaits them in the Heavenly Paradise. C. D. a j j Christmas Joy-Bells. Hark ! how the joy-bell's silver peal Rings far across the snow; While moonbeams sweet, like angels, . A Throw their Christmas smiles below. The night's filled with devotion And, upon her jeweled wings, A song of love comes floating And a wealth of joy it brings. It tunes all hearts to beating With its notes of right, good cheer; Those voices of the midnight ' 1 Sing to bless the coming year. Their song has rung for ages f i , On the quickened pulse of Time And " Gloria in Excclsis" Is the burden of its rhyme. . - Then twine a holly wreath of joy While bright the yule-log glows S And raise your voices in the song, That from yon belfry flows; It steals far o'er the city, Like an angel's whispered prayer; It fills all hearts with...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 364 if v New Year's Eve. STILLNESS of surprise and awe conies over our hearts as we commune with the last hours of the A departing year. Our life's allotted term, though qhnrf fnmio"Vi InAauA ic AnaA mtt- -- no J o.-v w.., WAWl.gt., 1IIUI.U IO UVJV.U UIIV WW HO 111 Z3J many tiny portions as to deceive us by their unceasing repetitions, about its real length, and to beguile us with the impression of its end less duration. Minute coming after minute, hour succeeding hour, engross, each in its turn, our attention; and we have become so busy dealing with each diminutive section as it passes through our hands, that to pauseand to reckon into onethose hours and days and weeks, takes our breath away. We are startled to see facing us the mysterious figure of Time. Yet it is only true wisdom to face Time's mysteries. For each of us has no mean part to act upon Time's stage; and since that stage is forever moving, since its scenes and its trap pings are flitting past us i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

36 The Indian Advocate. Present in the light of Past and Future. Such is the philosophy that may occur to every man in the old year's leave-taking. But to us, Christians, the New Year's Eve must suggest other serener thoughts and emotions. A flow of light is shed from our Holy Faith upon time's darkest recesses; the soul that has bowed in adoration be fore the crib of Bethlehem and the gibbet of Calvary is no longer puzzled by the fleeting show of life. Since the one Being Who dwells beyond all succession of time came to our ' midst, submitting Himself in our own nature a slave to the cruellest vicissitudes of a lifetime, we have the answer of life's puzzle, and the upperhand of Time. We are its masters; we . j know how to deal with it, and what to look for beyond it. We know from Him that we are not flitting aimlessly across the world's stage; that what we term our lifetime is only a first speck of our existence, soon to merge into an abiding pos session; that its restless pageant ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

"I The Indian Advocate. 366 claim for us at this hour an undying record. For the harvest of happiness left by the departing year, God be a thousand times blessed. But all was not equally good in the past; the many op portunities wasted, too many blunders, too many disorders, perhaps, have cried to Heaven for redress. But the deserved punishment is even yet withheld, and, oh wonders of Christian penance ! one word of self-accusing, one pang of sorrow, one firm resolve, blots out our wrong-doing from the book of death. For those saving mercies of the dying year, we thank God from the bottom of our heart. Christian souls, do not turn lightly away from past years; converse with them rather, listen to their lessons; and raise within you from the good and the evil of by-gone days a last ing memorial of Divine Love. And thou, that comest shrouded in mystery, New Year, coming we know not whether with a smile ora frown whence is it that we can hail thee confidently? Is it because every child...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

r 367 The Indian Advocate. MMlMMimMMtttttiAA4 ITHE INDIAN ADVOCATE 4 l4 f -- II r. .1 1. ! . - 1.V..1 ..f i 11 ruoiisucu oy inc isencuicuiic rumcio a I T$J (i QAnipwn wwAwrn ArrswrnV nk'T.AHOAfA. 2! jj .. . , A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary. St. Michael and St. llencdict. Approved by otir Regular Superiors. TKKMH OP HnilHCHrrONl Single Copies 15c. Annual Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Scqond-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. I'HIVILKGKSl 1. Every Subscriber and ltcncfauor will participate in all the merit-;, prayer, and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of September,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 368 The religious significance of Christmas appeals more strongly than mere social sentiment to the Catholic heart. Tact is a gift; it is likewise a grace. As a gift it may or may not have fallen to our share; as a grace we are bound either to possess or acquire it. Accept as coming from the hand of your Lord the cross He gives you to carry. The soul which knows the value of the cross delights to suffer, and love softens suffering by the remembrance that Heaven is its reward. Some one has said that the quietest lives are the hap piest. So, too, the quietest pleasures are the most enjoyable, and home-keeping hearts the happiest. Who takes pleasure in small things has found the secret of content. Unto what does the Infant Jesus come? To riches, lux ury, a throne, a palace? He comes to poverty, contempt, neg lect, to cold and a manger-bed. But He comes, besides, to the arms of a mother whose holiness is immaculate, and whose love is moreardent than the seraphim's, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

369 The Indian Advocate. .t,tt,Htttttt ,tttt(tttttt(t4. I ifr Those Bloody Priests. $, L: : i I N the October number of the Twin Territories, of Muskogee, a certain Iste-Chule, a descend ant of the Celt and the Saxon, comes forth with a pen sketch of the wrongs inflicted upon the un happy Aborigines of North, Central and South America. The article is not a very lengthy one, and fu ture historians in search of documentary evidence, will be ill-advised to consult the aforesaid num ber of the Twin Territories when they undertake to arraign before their tribunal the men who, in the Sixteenth century, changed the face of America. That the Indians have great cause to resent the unwar rantable treatment meted out to them by individuals and gov ernments, no man with any sense of justice will deny, much less ourselves, who, years before the Twin Territories issued its first printed pages from the press, have, by the medium of Thf Indian Advocate, endeavored to enlist the sympathies of the pr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 370 and spear of the soldier were but little less destructive than were the min istrations of their bloody priests. Instead of teaching the love and charity proclaimed and practiced by Christ, they sought to mike proselytes by tor ture. The priestly followers of Pizarro, Cortez, De Soto and other early ad venturers were more inhuman and implacable than the soldiers themselves. The Spanish soldiers and the Spanish Friars were alike demoniac in their treatment of the Indians. The victims of the soldier's swords and guns met a happier fate than did the victims of religious fanaticism. Torture and proselyting went hand in hand. Both were damnable. "It is but simple justice to say that there are exceptions to this indict ment. There are records of priestly visitants who, solitary and alone, trav ersed the wilds of the American continent, intent only on doing good as they understood it, and sometimes falling as martyrs to their faith." A very strong indictment, indeed...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

37 1 The Indian Advocate. version upon all things Catholic, shall this time furnish us the necessary weapons to repel the onslaught of Iste-Chule on the Catholic Priesthood. " It would be useless to maintain that the Spanish Con querors are free from the stain of atrocities committed against the Indians. Excesses, wanton shedding of human blood, rapine, injustice, are dark spots that have denied all wars of conquest. They have not been wanting during the conquest of Mexico, and of Peru, nor during the exploration of De Soto. Yet it was fortunate that these bands of adventurous soldiers, who in small numbers overcame millions of dusky warriors were accompanied by ministers of peace whose sole desire was the conquest of souls. As to the four priests that accompanied Cortez, nothing blamable can be said of their conduct. Nor can anything reprehensible be said of their method of turning the minds of the natives from their gross and cruel superstitions. The rack and torture they never us...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 372 compulsory conversion, sanctioned by Catholic missionaries, can be found on record. All this can be easily established on the word and authority of Prescott himself. Wherever he went to fulfill his Divine mission, the Cath olic Missionary uniformly opposed every species of violence, whether the body of the native was at stake or external influ ence was employed to bend his will. Speaking of the Indians' conversion and the way and means to be used for its accom plishment, Las Casas, the great defender of the rights of the natives, and a Dominican friar, to boot, says:" The only way of doing this is by long, assiduous and faithful preaching, un til the heathen shall gather some ideas of the true nature of the Deity and of the doctrines they are to embrace. Above all the lives of the Christians should be such as to exemplify the truth of these doctrines that seeing this the poor Indian may glorify the Father and acknowledge Him who has such wor shipers for the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

373 The Indian Advocate. The three other priests, Aquilar, Gomara and Juan Diaz, were filled with the same kind of earnest zeal, and pity for the vanquished, and we can say the same of the other missionaries that subsequently followed in their wake. As soon as things had taken a quieter aspect in Mexico, Cortez applied to Spain for more friars, not to torture and finish up what the sword had left of the Mexicans, but to administer spiritual care upon the thousands that flocked around his standard and asked to adopt the religion of the Conquerers. Twelve were sent in 1524. Of their character Prescott speaks as follows: "They were men of unblemished piety of life, nourished with the learning of the cloister, and like many others whom the Rom ish (?) Church has sent forth on such apostolic missions, counted all personal sacrifices as little in the Sacred Cause to which they were devoted. The presence of the Reverend Fathers in the country was greeted with general rejoicings. The inhabi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

T The Indian Advocate. 374 It might be said against them that the friars and priests were instrumental in the destruction of the temples of the Aztecs. This is true, and who can blame them for it? Father Sahi.gun who has preserved for posterity the Aztec Annals, which he took great pains to collect with the help of native converts, says: " We took the children of the Caciques into our schools where we taught them to read, write and to chant. The children of the poorer natives were brought together in the court-yard and there instructed in the Christian faith. Af ter our teaching, one or two brethren took the pupils to some neighboring Teocalli, and, by working at it for a few days, they leveled it to the ground." The antiquarian may lament such wholesale destruction of monuments that gave an insight into the history of a cu rious people, but the priests who laid these ruins deserve the thanks of the civilized world forabolishing the horrid mysteries perpetrated in these temples. Tho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

375 The Indian Advocate. violence in order to make Christians of the natives, Father Toribio (a priestly follower) could not say that in twenty years the Church of Mexico counted 9,000,000 converts. The success of the missionaries in the field of conversion cannot, humanly speaking, be accounted but by the mild measures that were employed, to-wit: good example, pious living, per suasion and unrelenting instruction. Moreover, who has not heard of the stoic character of the Indian, of his savage but admirable pride, of his extraordinary powers of endurance, of his defiance of bodily pain? If extreme measures had been adopted by the priests and friars, few conversions would have occurred; They knew better, and besides it would have been against all traditions of the Catholic Priesthood. In his history of the Conquest of Peru, during which Pizarro and Almagro had indulged in an orgy of crime, we find the following appreciation of the works of priests an'd friars: " After the close of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 376 v was required by the crown to bring out a certain number of these holy men in hi own vessels: and every succeeding ves sel brought an additional reinforcement of ecclesiastics. They were not all like the Bishop of Cuzo, with hearts so seared with fanaticism as to be closed against sympathy with the un fortunate natives. They were, many of them, men of singu lar humility, who followed in the track of the conqueror to scatter the seeds of spiritual truth, and, with disinterested zeal, devoted themselves to the propagation of the Gospel. Thus did their pious labors prove them true soldiers of the Cross, and show that the object so ostentatiously avowed of carrying its banner among the heathen nations was not an empty vaunt." The effort to Christianize the heathen is an honorable characteristic of the Spanish Conquest. The Puritan, with equal religious zeal, did comparatively little for the conver sion of the Indian, content, as it would seem, with having secur...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

377 The Indian Advocate. nation under his lot, and light up his dark intellect with the revelation of a holier and happier existence. In reviewing the blood-stained records of Spanish colonial history, it is but fair, and at the same time cheering, to reflect that the same nation which sent forth the hard-hearted conqueror from its bosom, sent forth the missionary to do the work of benefi cence and spread the light of Christian civilization over the farthest regions of the New World." . In this last quotation reference is made of Vincente de Valverde, a Dominican friar who accompanied Pizarro and subsequently became Bishop of Cusco. Historians do not agree as to the part he took in the judicial murder of the Inca Atahualpa. Even granting that, faithless to his calling, and stifling in his breast those sentiments of pity which must swell the breast of a follower of Christ, he gave his assent to the death sentence pronounced upon a fratricide prince, this solitary example does not dis...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 378 four ot the seats and votes were given to ecclesiastics, and under the clerical influence many beneficent regulations were passed in behalf of the Indians. They are legion, the priests whose names have been kept on record as benefactors of the Indian race. We havealready named a few. In addition we shall only mention Martin de Valencia, Ramirez de Fuendal, Marroquin de la Gasca, St. Francis Solanus. We cannot suffer to pass without some reference the work done by the Jesuits in Paraguay and Argentina. Who has not heard of the Reductions of Para guay, where the Indians under the wise direction of Cath olic priests formed self-governing communities that may be proposed as the ideal government. Although under the suze rainty of Spain, no Spaniard was allowed within its confines without the sanction of the Jesuit Fathers; and if, today, the Indians in Paraguay have relapsed into a barbarous state, it is because the decrees of a Pombal drove away the guardians an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

379 The Indian Advocate. ruins of convents around which clustered the wandering tribes of the Coast. They were centers of flourishing indus try where the Indian learned the arts of peace, and his child ren were instructed in all that can embellish the mind and im prove the crude code of morality that governs the life of the savage. Even today we can see the magnitude of the work accomplished by the sweet and patient tuition of the Friars if we look towards the South and see the independent republics that have risen upon the ruins of Spanish domination. A large percentage of Indian blood courses through the veins of several of their rulers and it is not rare to find full-blooded Indians who could put to shame their white neighbors. The Spanish Conquistador drained the country of its gold, but upon the exhausted mines the friar taught the natives to plow the ground for what is better than gold, and raised on the foundation of its inhuman temples seats of learning that once upon a time...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 380 of all the sweets of civilized life to share the toils and depri vations of their dusky flocks. Their achievements read like a romance of the trouveurs and minnesingers, and one is astounded at the great- deeds of those laborers in the work of evangelizing and bending down the fierce hearts of untutored savages. The epic which sings their peaceful con quests remains to be written, but any one who is conversant with the early history of this country can gather enough proofs to convince himself that the Indian had always a de voted friend in the Catholic Priest. As we cannot, for the sake of brevity, launch in a sea of quotations, we refer the reader, for further ample proof of what we advance, to Bancroft's History of the United States, chap. 20, vol. 3. To sum up let us say that never from priestly lips fell the horrible words: " A good Indian is a dead Indian." When, in violation of all the laws of humanity, the sav age warrior brandished his tomahawk over ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

381 The Indian Advocate. whenever his pen touches historical questions. The three last named qualities should not be found only in the historian but also in the student of history. D. E1.01. ' o 2& j The Society for the Propagation of the Faith, an inter national association for the support of Catholic Missions. Approved by Popes, Councils and Bishops. Spiritual fav ors granted' to members. Annals 0 the Propagation of the J?aith,a.n illustrated bi-monthly Magazine with news of .the Missions, published in various languages. For conditions of membership, and the publications of the Society, address The society for the Propagation of the Faith, Baltimore, Md. St. Benedict's Manual has been published in a new edi tion, revised and enlarged. Though containing nearly nine hundred pages it is not at all too bulky, owing to the quality of the paper, and deserves to find a place in every Catholic family. Besides the essentials of every Catholic prayer-book it contains a great variety of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

Thk Indian Advocate. 382 EDUCATION SPOILS THEM. 4? j? M M SEVERE arraignment of the Indians on the Pon ca, Otoe and Missouri reservations in Oklaho- Al ma is made by Agent Erwin, in charge of the res ervation, in his annual reDort to the Commis sioner of Indiaan affairs. The report says: " Hardly any of the young Indians, those who have graduated from non-reservation schools, as well as those who have attended for a number of years, do any work at all. It can be set down as a perfectly safe rule that, as a class, young edu cated Indians are the most worthless ones in the the whole tribe. Nearly all the work done by the tribes is performed by middle-aged, able-bodied ones, who cannot write or speak English. An educated Indian coming from school usually gives the excuse that he has nothing with which to work neither money, implements nor stock of any kind. This is true, but 1 notice that they manage to live on their an nuities and lease money, and buy horses, buggies, etc., on credit,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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