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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News Volume 56, Number 9 Coyotes find plenty to eat on Virginia's farms By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RlCHMOND—Virginia offers a choice of lambs, calves and chickens to coyotes, and these crafty carnivores are sampling everything on the menu. Coyotes killed 1,100 sheep and 800 calves in Virginia in 1996, said Martin Lowney, state director for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services Program. "We're 100 percent sure coyotes did this," Lowney noted. When attacking, a coyote crushes the throat of its victim in a relatively neat, clean fashion. Dogs typically grab a calf or lamb anywhere and make a mess, he added. Coyotes live in many Virginia counties —from Tazewell to those on the Eastern Shore, Lowney said. "In Southwest Virginia, they're a tremendous problem for cattle." Indications are that Virginia has thousands of coyotes, and the number is increasing, he noted. "In the evening in the Shenandoah Valley, you can hear six to eight coyotes respond wh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News u#^ jr g;k7l ~, . lftJb " ~Yi> ot f i s J James S. Gilmore 111 Politicians reassure farmers Virginia's gubernatorial candidates promised, if elected, to support nearly every aspect of agriculture—the state's largest industry. That was the message from Republican gubernatorial candidate James S. Gilmore 111 cmd U. Gov. Donald S. Beyer Jr., the Democratic nominee for governor. They spoke to 350 farmers and agricultural leaders on Sept. 30 at the state fair. "Tobacco is essential to the Virginia economy," Beyer said. Virginia's congressional delegation should "protect tobacco interests" and continue price supports and see that crop insurance is available fa the golden leaf, he said. However, "we must keep cigarettes out of the hands of teens. One in three teem smokes and one-third of them wtti die of smoking-related illnesses." Along with Gilmore's plan to aboHsh local taxes on personal vehicles, he said he favors a tax break for landowners who have wetland ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 Hog farms are safe, important to economy Pork and pork products have been a part of this great nation since Colonial days when some of the earliest agrarians began raising hogs for bacon, sausage, cured ham and cooking lard. Hogs, like other agricultural commodities of yesteryear, sustained the very existence of a new and struggling nation. Nearly 400 years later, the pork industry still plays a major role in Virginia's economy and its quest to be fed. And today, some of the leanest cuts of meat available to the American consumer are pork products. Hogs are a $63 million business to farm families across the state each year. Yet, hog farm operations in Virginia are getting a bad rap because of misguided perceptions about environmental safeguards This confusion has forced an ad hoc study committee to review the matter and report its findings to the 1998 General Assembly. It has also resulted in a number of localities around the state working to keep new or expanding hog ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News Sabato spends half of each day reading news (Continued from page 1) him during a member luncheon on Dec. 3. Sabato, 45, has appeared on dozens of shows, including "Nightline," "Face the Nation," "The Today Show," "Good Morning America," "48 Hours" and "Larry King Live." He has written more than a dozen books, including "Toward the Millennium: The Elections of 1996" and "Dirty Little Secrets: The Persistence of Corruption in American Politics." The down-to-earth intellectual with Southern charm is a news junkie. That's part of being a political analyst, he said. He reads four to six newspapers each day. He pulls up a dozen newspapers on the Internet and uses four VCRs to record news on three major networks, as well as "Inside Politics" and "Nightline." He subscribes to 30 publications about politics and public affairs. "I spend a good half of my day just reading," he said. Even at his office at the University of Virginia, Sabato's computer screen displays the latest ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 MThe perfect truck for all you farm animals is Magnum V-6 or V-8 engine. Even our Ram Vans a Dodge. And if you're a member of a partic- and Ram Wagons are part of the deal with $500 Jm ipating state Farm Bureau, this is the perfect back. All this cash is on top of any other jmjM time to buy one. national Dodge consumer incentive offer, too.** As a member, All you need to do is get a certificate from Regular and Club Cab you've been a member for Pickups." And $500 back on Wt at l( (,s! (lavs ,lu n s "' f) Ram 2500 and 3500 Pickups and '• 1 I'Mm y° ur Dodge dealer. Where you'll Wtm Chassis Cabs, and including our new find a line of trucks that work ■HjR our full line of Magnum® engines including the HlllH 1/A 1/J? \/1/!„// fli/i r.HMMmr ThkA/i n;.../ 'Excludes Quad Cab. "This cash back offer is valid for members of paitici- ■Ij 9£jll|H| »"Oi V~IU ana ine luroo Uiesei. pating Farm Bureaus, is scheduled to expire 7/31/98, and is subject to change lyf ifil Wp're nlcn oivin ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Farmers deride global climate treaty RICHMOND—There are few things farmers worry more about than the weather. But growers are now concerned Washington politicians may be going too far in agreeing to future restrictions of socalled greenhouse gases. The proposed Global Climate Change Treaty could cost U.S. farmers "up to 24 percent of their net farm income," said C. Wayne Ashworth, president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. The treaty would require at least a new 25-cent tax on fossil fuels to bring the United States into compliance. Corn growers would fare the worst under such a treaty, because their crop depends so heavily on fossil fuels and petrole-um-based fertilizers, Ashworth said. They would be followed by soybean, cotton, wheat and hog producers and then dairy farmers. The Global Climate Change Treaty is scheduled to be signed in Japan in December. Drought was actually helpful to state's small grains crop RICHMOND—The drought conditio...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 Coyotes 'eat dam near anything,' official says These sly canines have been known to eat dogs, cats (Continued from page 1) ever, did eat portions of the lambs. The killing for sport is usually a training session, Lowney said. "You have a whole family—two adults and seven pups—out there trying to kill a flock of sheep. Mom and dad are out teaching the pups how to hunt." Dogs attack sheep or cattle night after night or during the day, but coyotes kill on random nights. Coyotes are quite adaptive; they can thrive in Los Angeles suburbs and in deserts, Martin said. "They eat darn near anything—birds, berries, insects, voles and moles." "If you're a responsible pet owner, you'd better keep your cat in the house, and your dogs," Lowney said. "Coyotes like to eat cats and dogs. A dog less than 20 pounds is an hors d'oeuvre for a coyote." Some residents of urban areas have made the mistake of leaving table scraps out for coyotes, Martin said. "We don't advocate feeding wildlif...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News Ag leaders examine investigators RICHMOND—A task force plans to ask state lawmakers to examine the authority and training of those who investigate complaints of farm animal neglect. These humane investigators are volunteers appointed by circuit court judges to enforce the comprehensive animal laws. Animal control officers are local government or sheriff's department employees and they also enforce the comprehensive animal laws or deal with stray animals. They deal mostly with companion animals. On occasion, these individuals must investigate neglect or cruelty cases which involve agricultural animals. Problems have occurred as a few investigators let personal agendas and a lack of knowledge about farm animals jeopardize investigations, said Martha Moore, senior assistant director of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Public Affairs Department. The task force includes representatives of the VFBF, animal and humane groups, and seven other organizations. The task fo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 72nd ANNUAL CONVENTION • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU Pr JBBF JBr' Br Convention Highlights Monday, Dec. 1 Workshop (9 a.m., all day) Timber Marketing and Harvesting Commodity Luncheon (noon) Facts Not Fear . • Jane S. Shaw ° Commodity Workshops (1:30-4:45 p.m.) Session I: A Regulated Agriculture Session II:. Agriculture's Voluntary Achievements Family Night Program (7 p.m.) Young Farmers' Auction (9 p.m.) Tuesday, Dec. 2 Young Farmers' Breakfast (7 am) General Session (9:30 a.m.) Jay Poole, chairman of the AITC Foundation board Women's Luncheon (ii:3oa.m.) Lifting the Limits Randy Fraizer, motivational speaker Special Interest Workshops (2 p.m.) (Environment, Right-to-Farm) District Caucuses (4 p.m.) Insurance Forum (7 30 p.m.) Wednesday, Dec. 3 General Session (8 30 a.m.) Membership Luncheon (noon) Strengthening Virginia's Rural Vote Dr. Larry Sabato, U. Va. General Session (2 p.m.) Banquet (7 p.m.) Jennifer Lauren, Vocalist Thursday, Dec. 4 General Session <8:30 ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 72nd ANNUAL CONVENTION • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU Experts to advise on environmental concerns mm wS-r I t "~~ ' B ~ X Ife I I - Ifafe. WB *r-<-> . i HL IfIBvHHHV4 /■l !VB||U ' :^v ' a** M m-, . VpH Rv f : JuHHram| ; Retirement is central part of workshop RICHMOND—If you're older than 65, statistics indicate you have a 2-in-5 chance of spending part of your life in a nursing home. The average stay in a nursing home is two and a half years, and that would cost $100,000, said Dale Wilkinson, president of the Wilkinson Group Inc. of Botetourt County. Wilkinson will speak at 2 p.m. on Dec. 2 as part of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention. The convention will be Dec. 1-4 at the Richmond Marriott. His workshop is titled, "Long-term Care...A Harvest of Security." He will discuss the advantages of long-term care insurance. Virginia Farm Bureau began offering this coverage in February. VFBF has a contract with the Wilkinson Group to represent ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News 72nd ANNUAL CONVENTION • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU Five directors up for re-election at convention By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND—Five directors on the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's board are running for reelection this year. The election is set for Dec. 4 at the VFBF Annual Convention, wh-ich is Dec. 1-4 at the Richmond Marriott. At press time, the five incumbents were running unopposed. District 2 Archie Bailey, a livestock and tobacco producer in Washington County, has served on the board since 1978. He joined Farm Bureau in 1957 and began serving on the county's board in 1959. He is past president of the Washington County Farm Bureau, and currently serves as chairman of the VFBF Burley Tobacco Committee. Bailey is also a member of the VFBF Livestock Committee and the VFBF Budget and Audit Committee. He is a past member of the VFBF Highway Study Committee and is a current member of the American Farm Bureau Federation Sheep Committee. Bailey...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 7 2nd ANNUAL CONVENTION • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU Environmental book to be on sale (Continued from page C-l) banned or severely restricted." When, in fact, "chemicals have transformed farming. Pesticides have nearly eliminated the ancient scourge of insect infestation, and fertilizer allows farmers to restore the nutrients that plants take from the soil as they grow," Mrs. Shaw and her co-author, Michael Sanera, explain in the book. "Bans on pesticides may actually have serious health consequences." Children also are taught that Guide book to be available to producers (Continued from page C-2) intensive livestock operation needs to periodically check equipment and evaluate waste management practices, and by doing this, problems are avoided." Producers will have a chance to discuss problems at the workshop and hear ideas for correcting those problems, Harper said. Collins' speech is titled, "Do Liquid Waste Lagoon Systems Protect the Environment?" He'll talk about the best...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 Are you 65 or over? Do You Know Who Will Pay Your Medical Bills? Don't count on Medicare alone...it wasn't designed to pay all of your medical bills. And in 1997 Medicare deductibles and copayments that come out of your pocket are higher than ever. Many American s have found out too late...and are faced with medical bills that can total tens of thousands of dollars*...money they were saving for retirement. DONT LET IT HAPPEN TO YOU. Consider the Farm Bureau Medicare Supplement Program provided by Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield. A partnership designed with your convenience in mind... • Virginia Farm Bureau and Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield - 2 of Virginia's well known and financially sound companies, each with 60 years of experience serving Virginians like you. • Trigon offers 6 plans that help pav the medical bills not paid for bv Medicare- You choose the plan that best fits your needs and budget. • Personal Service and Local Convenience— There are over 90 Farm Bureau o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News Award-winning grower gets visit from scientist (Continued from page 1) remarked. "To be able to ride around in a combine and talk about corn is a real benefit to me," added the senior research associate for Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. Dr. Briggs and Hula participated in the American Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee's Adopt-A-Scientist Program, which is in its 10th year. Dr. Briggs is the third scientist to visit the state as a guest of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee. "We have to wait until there's a scientist who wants to come to Virginia," said Helen B. Neese, the VFBF State Women's Committee chairman. "But we've always said that if someone wanted to come, we'd do what we could to accommodate them." Storm water, lawn fertilizer pollute bay (Continued from page 2) Stoneman said. "We can do the nutrient management programs, we can apply Best Management Practices" to prevent nutrient runoff and erosion, but there could be a need f...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 Young farmers promoting ag worldwide Virginia young farmers are going global! Our young farmers were the first to donate money to the World Congress of Young Farmers, an international meeting slated for February 2000 in Orlando. Our group donated $1,000 because we think the world congress is something that's going to benefit everyone who is involved in agriculture. The meeting will give young farmers from around the world an opportunity to better understand agricultural issues at the global level. DOUBLE WINNER Win A Free Trip For 2 To The Bahamas and Save Big Money On Your Long Distante Telephone Bills It's Easy ... To Save Money! Just enroll in the Farm Bureau's long distance telephone service The Farm Bureau Connection. Farm Bureau members who have already enrolled tell us they have saved up to 40 to 60% per month. Plus you get many other services like: • 800 number • telephone calling cards. ... To Win A Trip For 2 To Tho Bahamas Just enroll in the Farm Bureau's CO...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News Many tractors have no ROPS RICHMOND—You see them parked beside gardens, on farms and in equipment sales lots—tractors without rollover protective structures. No doubt, tractors are useful in tilling gardens, operating farm machinery and removing snow from driveways. But tractors can be lethal without a ROPS, which affords the same protection as a rollbar in a race car, said Bruce Stone, safety coordinator for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Tractors with a ROPS should also have a seat belt. Of the estimated 4.8 million tractors in use on American farms, only 38 percent have a ROPS, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation. Tractor rollovers account for 130 work-related deaths annually in America, and so far in 1997, they've accounted for four fatalities in Virginia. Hog farmers fight unfair zoning issues BUCKINGHAM—There may not be a full-scale war yet, but several Virginia counties are in the midst of skirmishes over zoning ordinances and Right-to-Farm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 Guatemalans grow food with primitive methods Editor's note: Kathy Dixon was part of a church missions team that helped build houses for widows in rural Guatemala. The women lost their husbands during a civil war in the 1980s. The following is Mrs. Dixon's personalized report on agriculture in the land of the volcanic highlands. BY KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist CHONTALA', GUATEMALA— "According to the Popol Vuh, sacred book of the Quiche' Maya, the gods created the earth and then fashioned humans from corn to be its guardians," an airport visitor's guide read. "From that day on, the lives of the inhabitants of the Guatemalan highlands have been inexorably linked to the land . . . and the cultivation of corn, which they regard as the staff of life." The visitor's guide I received at the Guatemala City airport helps explain why corn grows everywhere in the highlands of Guatemala. Corn grows up the sides of fertile mountains, in residential front yards, and in ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. Please TYPE your ad and mall it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) t Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the 10TH of each month preceding the publication month. > Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. > Ads MUST include member number to be published. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: A...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

November 1997 Survey is your chance to win weekend getaway Readers, the staff of the Farm Bureau News would greatly appreciate your responses to the following survey. This survey will help us serve you better. As an incentive, we will have a drawing on Friday, Dec. 19 at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and one completed survey form will be drawn. The winner of the drawing will, receive a weekend getaway package for four in Washington, D.C. It will include two FREE nights in a suite at the Floliday Inn Capitol, which is near Smithsonian museums and the Capitol. A suite normally costs $219 per night. The package also includes meals and tickets for the theatrical performance, "Sheer Madness." The package will be usable through 1998, and actual date of use will depend on suite availability. What do you like MOST about Farm Bureau News? (Please rank the items I to 9, with a 9 being the most appreciated item.) 1) Articles 2) Editorials 3) Young Farmers' and Women's columns 4) Wellness...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1997

Farm Bureau News For niorc information call:l-800-229-7779 or contact your local Farm Bureau office and ask for our Jree brochure. HBKbsl® A, /* * >^« Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? ___ - f^PHI The Voice of Virginia's Agricultural Producers You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! B jfjf | I >; | M'. WH. H '■_ w; : 'SSsmdm ■ ifl EL T ■fMWTW.i iiidL-jMBI ijiTTBBBBBWWMMHMIMW'f TMMB—. JLjI _ , _ ~ Health Care Coverage ttroaa Kange OI # jf y OU are unc j er a g e 55 — f or Individuals or families Coverage • If you are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. With over 100 loc...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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