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Elephind.com contains 10,014 items from Dawn, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HINTS FOR BOYS. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

HINTS FOR BOTS. BOTS, try to commit the following to memory: Hat lifted in saying "Good-bye" or "How do you do ?" Hat lifted when offering a seat in a car or in acknowledging a favour. Keep step with anyone you walk with. Always precede a lady upstairs, and ask her if you may precede her in passing through a crowd or public place. Hat off the moment you enter a street door, and when you step into a private hall or office. Let a lady pass first always unless she asks you to precede her. In the parlour, stand till every lady in the room is seated, also older people. Rise if a lady comes in after you are seated, and stand until she takes a seat. Look people straight in the face when speaking or being spoken to. Let ladies pass through a door first, stand ing aside for them. In the dining room take your seat after ladies and elders. Never play with knife fork or spoon. Do not take your napkin in a bunch in your hand. Eat as fast or as slowly as others and finish the course when they do....

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

"The trudi, the truth, and nothing but the truth." HARDMAN BROTHERS, ÎWTPW Not True Unscrupulous grocers will tell you, "they are as good as" or "the same as the. Primrose." IT'S FALSE-The Primrose never was excelled, and if your, grocer sends you something in place of the Primrose, the honestjthing to do is send it bad.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WOMAN PHYSICIAN. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

A WOMAN PHYSICIAN. We have great pleasure in recording the first addition of a woman's name to the Medical Register of New South Wales. Miss Frances Dick, M.B., B.Ch. has thus been officially recognised as a fully qualified practitioner, and it will gratify many of our readers if we give her address -which is,-151 Macquarie street north, Sydney.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How to Make Toffee at Home. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

3JP KNEW a girl of thirteen years who used to lay out SJ? most of her weekly pittance in sugar and butter, and make toffee that would melt in one's mouth. She did this rather than spend her money at the confection er's, for two reasons ; first, because she could make it just as she pleased ; and second, because she had more of it when she put in all the labor herself. She not only had as much toffee as her money could buy, but an additonal amount equivalent to the value of the labour she put into the making of the toffee. For these very identical reasons many other people, young and old, indulge in toffee-making at home. But it were a mistake to suppose that this is all that can be said inbehalf of toffee-making at home. Those who have not tried it know not how mnch fun can be got out of it. There is also the anticipation. And we confess, that in many cases, the anticipation is more enjoyable than the realization. For this reason, therefore, this article may be found full of useful ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Some Uses of Hot Water. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

Sortie Uses of Hot Water. THE uses of hot water are many : For example, there is nothing that so promptly cuts short congestion of the lungs, sore throat, or rheumatism, as hot water when applied promptly and thoroughly. Headache almost always yields to the sim ultaneous application of hot water to the feet and back of the neck. A towel folded several times, and dipped in hot water, and quickly wrung out and applied over the toothache or neuralgia, will generally afford prompt relief. A strip of flannel, or napkin folded length ways, and dipped in hot water and wrung ont, and then applied round the neck of a child who has the croup, will sometimes bring relief in ten minutes. Hot water taken freely hali an hour before bed-time, is helpful in the case of constipation, while it has a most soothing effect upon the Btomach and bowels. A cup of hot water taken just after rising, before breakfast, has cured thousands of in digestion, and no simple remedy is more widely recommended by phys...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Dread of Sea-Sickness. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

The Dread of Sea-Sickness. HUNDREDS of women-and men, too, for that matter-who intend going abroad this summer season, dread the possibility of being sea-sick. Every precaution ever thought of, printed or told, is borne in mind, and many women go on board ship with a quantity of so-called "remedies" enough to kill ten ordin malady is so little understood by the doctors as sea-sickness, and no matter what they may recommend to quiet the fears of intending voyagers, there is no such thing as a remedy. Is there any cause for uneasiness in this ? Not a particle. There is nothing in the world so productive of good results as sea-sickness. True, it is unpleasant, but so is any good med icine. If women would anticipate sea-sickness less, they would be more comfortable. A good dose of sea-sickness is the best Turkish bath imaginable. You may feel as if you are going to die, but depend upon it you will not. As a rule, two days is the limit, and then it is over, and never will you feel so wel...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Nine Rules for Bathers. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

Nine Rules for Bathers. Avoid bathing within two hours after a meal. Avoid bathing when exhausted by fatigue or from any other cause. Avoid bathing when the body is cooling after perspiration. Avoid bathing altogether in the open air if after having been a short time in the water it causes a sense of chilliness and numbness of the hands and feet. Bathe when the body is warm, provided no time is lost in getting into the water. Avoid chilling the body by sitting or standing undressed on the banks or in boats after having been in the water. Avoid remaining too long in the water ; leave the water immediately if there is the slightest feeling of chilliness. The vigorous and strong may bathe early in the morning on an empty stomach. The young and those who are weak, had better bathe two or three hours after breakfast. Those who are subject to attacks of giddiness or faintness, and those who suffer from palpita tion and other sense of discomfort at the heart, should not bathe.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Relief from Burns, Corns, &c. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

Relief from Burns, Corns, Ac. THE USEFULNESS OF TURPENTINE,-After a housekeeper fully realises the worth of turpentine in the household, she is never willing to be without it. It gives quick relief to burns ; it is an excellent application for corns ; it is good for rheumatism and sore throats. Then it is a sure preventive against moths, by just dropping a trifle in the bottom of drawers, chests and cup boards, it will render the garments secure from injury during the summer. It will keep ants from cupboards ; and it is sure destruction to bed bugs, and rill effectually drive them away from their haunts if thoroughly applied to all the joints of the bedstead, and injures neither furniture nor clothing. A spoonful of it added to a piil of warm water is excellent for cleaning paint.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Discovered through a Child. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

Discovered through a Child. WHEN Sir Humphry Davy was a boy about' sixteen, a little girl came to him in great excitement. "Humphry, do tell me why these two pieces of cane make a tiny spark of light when I rub them together." Humphry was a studious boy, who spent hours in think ing out scientific problems. He patted the child's curly head and said, "I do not know, dear. Let us see if they really do make a light, and then we will try to find out why." Humphry soon found that the little girl was right : the pieces of cane, if rubbed together quickly, did give a tiny light. Then he set to work to find out the reason, and after some time, thanks to the observing powers of his little friend, and his own kindness to her in not impatiently telling her not to "worry,1' as so many might have done, Humphry Davy made the first of his interesting discoveries. Every reed, cane, and grass has an outer skin of flinty stuff, which protects the inside from insects, and also helps the frail-looking ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

A Sewing Machine for 2M1. USUAL PRICE, ig/6. THE SMALLEST Lock-Stitch Sewing Hacbine In the UJorld. COMPLETE INSTRUCTIONS WITH EACH MACHINE. MARK FOY'S PRICE FOR THIS SEWING MACHINE IS 2S-11D. Postage i/- extra, I xi Future come to FGIJ, Oxford síveei?, STDNET.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Birthday Wish. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

A Birthday Wish. BY LOUISA LAWSON. Oh, could I as I lift this pen Mark out thy destiny, I would have thee happy now as when Nurs'd at thy mother's knee. I would have thee cherish'd, free from harm On this eventful morn, Bless'd and content, with brow as calm As the hour that thou wer't born. On a peaceful pillow thou wouldst sleep, Thy dreams should pleasant be ; Would God, I had the power to keep Thy heart from sorrow free. The flowers of hope thy path would strew, To walk in manly pride ; All hearts around thee firm and true, Great good should thee betide. I've not the power, alas, dear friend To give thee all I say, But hope they'll please, the lines I send Thee, on thy natal day.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Fairest Day. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

The Fairest Day. BY EDGAR FAWCETT. An old man mused, amid the twilight's haze, While he watched a fading fire alone, Which day of his long life's many days Could be named the fairest he had known. Then out of his memory voices broke, And all were of days that are past and dead ; He smiled at forgotten dreams they woke In the low, mellifluous words they said. Of the grand Swiss mountains' power and peace, Of the Orient's lazy and splendid spell, Of noons in Venice, of morns in Greece, Each day for its own sake pleaded well. But when all the magic murmurs died Where his chamber drowsed in the spent logs light "I was dim and cheerless," a new day sighed, "I was chill with blast, I was bleak with blight, "Yet I gave that first, warm, poignant thrill, When your first last love in your fond arms lay "Tis enough 1" cried the old man. "Bleak and chill, You of all my days were the fairest day !"

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To a Bird. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

To a Bird. BY LOUISA LAWSON. I'm listening, father, to a sound I've often heard thee say, Did come to call thee to thy toil just at the dawn of day, It's sweet and thrilling melody is ringing in the air And tells me day is breaking with a promise bright and fair; I wonder if it is the same bright warbler of the sky That came to wake thee, father, in the busy days gone by, I bless it though it may not be, and also fate that led It hither to dispel a dream that filled my soul with dread; For thoughts of that real sieming dream still -fill my heart with pain, And echoes of a stricken scream come floating through my brain ; For thou I thought wert weary and had cast life's burden down, And henceforth, and forever, I was here to toil alone; But that sweet bird awoke me, and it's clear notes on me fell With calming re-assurance for it told me all was well ; I thank it now most fervently for singing o'er my head, But father, may it call in vain to wake me when thou'rt dead ; But oh! couti ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POET'S PAGE. A Birthday Wish. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 February 1892

POET'S PAGE. - A Birthday Wish. BY LILIAN WHITING. What can I wish for thee, 0 friend of mine ! In all the bloom and beauty of the May ? Thou, whose fair life the poet's words portray, Wearing the white flower with its breath divine. Wealth, power and honor do I ask for thee; Yet not the wealth that's counted but in gold. The riches of right doing-purpose told In deeds that stamp thy life with majesty. Power-not to use but for thyself alone, But power to strengthen hands that else were weak, And power to bring high thought to them that seek, And lead from all that's known to the Unknown. The honor that must come from being true Unto the Heavenly Vision-which shall shine Ever upon your way-its light divine Transfiguring all old meanings into new. This do I ask for thee in these May days, That dawn with bloom and light and sweetness rife; Wearing the white flower of a blameless life, You footsteps set in His appointed ways.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
South Australia. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 March 1892

-- -*AJ South Australia. ON Feb. ist, the new Probate and Succession Act came into force, which contains a provision that when a man dies intestate his widow shall have five hundred pounds from the estate and then anything that is ove ithat shall be divided according to the general law of inherit ance, this means that the widow, after having received her five hundred shall still have a right to one-third of the remainder of the estate. The writer understands that a similar provision has recently become law in England. It is so just in itself, and of such advantage both to wid ows and widowers, for the widower has been given a similar advantage, that the women of N.S. Wales might well interview the Government and seek to secure a law on the same lines. THE new Education Act makes women eligible as members of the School Boards of Advice. THE Board of Management of the Childre n's Hospital North Adelaide, appointed a lady to the position of House Surgeon te that institution. The Board ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
In England. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 March 1892

In England. IN I 891, one hundred and thirteen women were elected Guardians under the Poor Law. ON 21st. March, 1881, women voted for the first time in the Isle of Man. THE women ratepayers who may vote at Municipal elections number 298,000. Those who may vote at County Council elections number 503,000. UP to October 1st., I891, more than 120 women have taken Medical Diplomas entitling them to enter their names on the British Register of duly qualified Medical Practitioners. SINCE degrees in Arts and Sciences were first conferred on women, 481 women have taken the degrees of B.A., B. Sc., etc. Cambridge University does not confer degrees, but 566 women students from Girton and Newnham are certificated and are graduates in all but the name. Lon* don University was the first to admit women to degrees in 1878.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RECIPES. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 March 1892

SPRING CAKE.-One cup of white sugar, two of sifted flour with a teaspoonful of Waugh's baking powder, half a cup of cold water and three eggs. Flavour with lemon and bake in a moderate oven. TOMATO SALAD.-Peel and slice six large tomatoes ; take one teaspoonful of oil, one of vinegar, a teaspoon ful each of mustard, salt and pepper ; mix and pour over the tomatoes. HAM AND EGGS, (an Easter breakfast dish.)-Cut in thin slices, fry tn a hot skillet for eight minutes, take up, lay on a heated dish and sprinkle with pepper ; break fresh eggs in the skillet, with a spoon dip the boiling tat over them until done. Serve one on each slice of ham. PADRE CURA PUDDING.-Two eggs, and their weight in flour, sugar, butter, and orange marmalade ; beat up well the yolks of the two eggs, and mix ; then add the whites well beaten to a froth, put the mixture into a basin or mould, and boil four hours. BAKED PEARS.-Wash them, put them in a deep pan, strew over plenty of white or brown sugar, and pour v...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Seasoning of Food. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 March 1892

Seasoning of Food. "I THINK," said a lady who prides herself on her dainty dishes, "that it isn't very far from a downright insult to a good cook for a guest to sit down at a table and, without tasting of the food, to deluge every dish with salt and pepper. For my part, I don't know why a cook seasons things at all if they are not supposed to be of proper flavour when put on the table. I think that with a great many people this extravagant use of seasoning is the merest habit. I know of a middle-aged man who was always very bashful. It was only by the greatest amount of argument and persuasion that he could be induced to eat a meal in a friend's honse. His discomfort and embarrassment were very great, and took on a most curious form. The moment a remark was addressed to him, especially if it came at all suddenly, he would seize the pepper-box and begin patting it, scat tering the contents over his food. If someone addressed him again, almost immediately, in a confused, nervous sort ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Pressed Australian Wild Flowers. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 March 1892

Pressed Australian Wild Flowers. MR. T. F. DECOURCY BROWN offers a prize of HALF-A-GUINEA to be awarded to any boy or girl sending in the Best Sample of Pressed Australian Wild Flowers. The exhibit may consist of a Spray, Bud, Fern leaf, or a bunch of Grass or Moss, but must not exceed the size of a post card. As this competition seems not to have been clearly understood, we extend the date until March loth, 1892 Open for boys and girls under the age of fourteen

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Missing Word" Problem. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 1 March 1892

"Missing Word" Problem. THE proprietors of the "Tarawera Water Boiler" offer prizes of FOUR BRIGHT NEW HALF-CROWNS to the first four boys or girls, under 16 years of age, sending in correct solutions to the undermentioned "Missing Word" problem. "Three men who met at East bes hotel, for purpose of holding a sort of ologioal discussion, were great ologians of three different schools, so to speak-Aism, and Pan ism and osophy. As re was great difficulty experienced in reaching desired understanding y reupon agreed to leave matter to wise man of East bes. y refore ¡eft East bes hall, and carried ir respective arguments to wise man. n wise man, who was very wise, refused to settle matter or even orize, being occupied with a odolite, and furrmore, as he was a ocrat, mes given were out of his line." Open till March iOth.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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