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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE VALUE OF SAWDUST. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

THE VAI.TIE OF SAWDUST. Sawdust if? being put to an increas ing number of useful purposes. Used as an absorbent for nitro-glycerino, it produce's dynamite. Used with clay and burned, it produces a terra-cotta , brick full of small cavities that, owing to its lightnoss and its properties as a non-conductor, makes excellent fire proof material for walls or floors. Troating it with fused caustic alkali produces oxalic acid. Treating it with sulphuric acid and" fermenting tho sugar so formed produces alcohol. Mix ed with a suitable binder and compress ed, it can bo used for making mould ings and imitation carvings. If mixed with Portland coment it produces a flooring material.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Double Chance. (Published by Special Arrangement.) CHAPTER XXI.—(Continued.) [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

The Double Chance. BY J S. FLETCHER, Author of "The Golden Hope," &c. (Published by Special Arrangement.) CHAi'TKK XXI.—(Continued.) "What more likely, then, that the Baronet should lake him into his confidence about those dia monds?" said the detective. "It is extremely likely that he would do so. What is absolutely certain is that Stead provided himself with a duplicate key of the safe, as you have just seen. All this is only serving to elucidate a mystery which is apart from the murder."' "You said just now that you kni-w where the diamonds were," said Quinton. "Does that mean "Ah, I spoke rather hurriedly," interrupted the inspector. "1 ought to have said that 1 have a very good idea where they will be found; as Stead was arrested and locked ' up very suddenly, I don't think he'll have had time to move them. I believe I shall find them in the orchard at his lodgings." "What, planted?" said Quinton, "Just so,'" replied Inspector ■ Cortelyou. ''And I believe that a certain...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WIRELESS NIGHT MIRROR TO MAKE THE SEAS SAFE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

WIRELESS NIGHT MIRROR TO MAKE THE SEAS S'AFE. A remarkable invention pregnant with useful possibilities is tho wireless long-distance mirror. Its purposo, in brief, is to convey an imago in tho samo manner that sounds are now communicated. It is a radical improvement of the old-time camera obscura, a structure in which tho real image of an object is projected upon a white table or other plane surface. Not only does tho now apparatus rofloct on a mirror all objects located and all happenings oc curring within a much greater area than tho camera obscura, but it ope rates at night. Just how tho machine works has not yet been revealed, but tho machine is known to consist of a web of wires attached to a tall mast, and it is this web of wires which receives tho im pressions and projects them on to the mirror located at the base of tlio mast. '•The image of every object withfn g radius of (wo or three miles Is thrown on Ihe mirror" The principal value of the new ap paratus will be in its a...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WISE AND OTHERWISE [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

WISE AND OTHERWISE Wisdom is knowing what to do next, virtuo is doing it. * # » • She: "I'm going to cook dinner to day myself. What would you like, dear?" He: "lir—cold beef and pickles I" ° » o a « Lady customer (in dopartmont store): Havo yon nnything to keep hair from falling? Clerk: Hairpins, two counters to tho right, madam. • » * • * Iier father: "Look here, young man, you've been hanging about here long enough; choose quickly—either my daughter's hand or her father's boot." Tho deck passenger: I notieo all tho stoerago passengers holt their food. I wondor why? Tho steward: They lolt tlioir food to keop it down, * « * » Smith: I say, old man, can yoki oblige mo with a fiver? I promise on tho word of a gentleman to repay you. Jones: All right. "Where's the gentle* man? » a • • „ • Been out of work for six months, havo you? Why, your eyes are simply staring out of thoir sockets with drink. That ain't drink sir; that's looking for work. • •••«.. Employer: You haven't a grand mot...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A MATTER OF VALUES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

A MATTER OF VALUES. A painting by Rembrandt recently sold for sixty thousand pounds. Living artists aro not so royally paid, yet most of them place ft higher valuation on their ivork than was placcd by tho old farmer who figures in tho following story. A distinguished etcher, sketching in the neighbourhood, made a study of the fanner's barn. Tho firrmor hap pened to appear, and said he'd liko to have tho sketch. "If it isn't too dear," ho added cautiously. "Oli," said tho otcher, who makes over two thousand a year, "I won't chargo you anything for tho sketch, but"—his eyo lighted on tho pig pen— "But I'll toll you what. You can give mo 0110 of those nico little pink sucking pigs thoro." "Why, man," said tho farmer, with a frown, "Do you know what - those pigs aro worth P Thoy're worth four shillings apiece."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STAGE FRIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

STAGE FRICHT. Very few people are really free from liability to stago fright, and the vete ran in public life is just as likely to be affected as is the novice. Attacks, moreover, frequently como when they are least expected. Hence no speaker or artiste can face an audience and feel that he will not have to suffer from the tortures of this particularly painful form of nervousness. Sometimes, instead of confusing the performer, stage fright serves as a wonderful stimulus. Once, just hefore Canning was to move an important measure in the House of Commons, a friend remarked to him: "Why, your hands are cold and clammy! You are nervous 1" "In that case," replied the great statesman, "I shall make a good speech." And on this occasion Canning even excelled himself. Musicians, of course, are the worst sufferers. The performer on a stringed instrument is helpless if his hand trembles; whilst the clear enunciation of a singer can bo ruined by that "catch in the throat," or that twitch ing of...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE IDEAL LAUNDRY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

THE IDEAL LAUNDRY. Ono Saturday afternoon, as ho walk ed leisurely homo from work, Kelly overtook O'Callighan cariying a small parcel which obviously contained his weekly washing. "I thought," said Kelly, "it was Mrs. Murphy that did your washing for you; but sHo lives tho other side of tho town." "Mrs. Murphy used to," answered O'Callighan, "but I left her to go to Widow Malone, who is an obliging body and doesn't object to sewing a button on a man's shirt when, she washes it." On the following Monday O'Callig han it was who overtook Kelly on his way to the Widow Malono; but was surprised to see that he only carried a pill-box. "And what," asked he, "is it you're after seeing tho widow for?" "I've been thinking over what you said about her being an obliging body," answered Kelly, "and Em taking her a button to bo washed and havo a shirt sewn on I"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DIPLOMATIC WOMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

DIPLOMATIC WOMAN. SIio woo young and fair, and a tear glistoncd in hor oyo as alio laid hor curly head upon his shoulder, and ox elaiinod :— "Oil, Georgo, I think if I found that you did not lovo me, I should dio." "My darling," ho answered, pars ing his hand gontly round her dimpled chin, "I will always lovo you. Do you think I would marry you if I did not fool sure of it? In a fow day« at tho altar I shall vow to lovo you all my life, and I will koop my vow." A lovely kind of beatific happiness played for a momont like sunshino on her lips, and thou sho whisporcd:— "Oh, Georgo, I liko to hoar you talk liko that. You havo boon so good to mo. You havo givon mo a diamond lockot, and a gold watcli and chain, and rings that an angel might woar outaido hor glovos and not ho asham ed ; and if I thought that ono day you'd be sorry you'd given mo all those nico things, and want thom back again I should break my heart." Ho hold her gontly against his man ly breast, and answered with a quave...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INVENTOR OF THE THERMOMETER. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

INVENTOR OP THE THERMO METER. ' It seems strange to think that a lit tle over 200 years ago the only way tliero was to tell of tho weather, or the atmosphere of a room, or to spoak about its boing hot or cold, was by one's own porsonal sensations. All wa need to do, from tho beginning of the yoar to its ond, is to look at tt® thermometer, and no matter how vary ing tho change may bo, it informs us correctly of tho stato of tho atmos phere whethor out of doors or in. Sevonteen hundred years appears to havo been a long timo to wait for such a convenient little instrument; and one, too, which is of course, of interest to everybody. Having bocomo accustom ed to its use, wo, of courso, are unablo to understand how tho peoplo of tho seventeenth- century over managed to get along without a thermometer. To bo sure many attempts wore made by scientific men to produce an instru ment for measuring heat and cold, but none of them wero successful. And if Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit had not fail ed...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POSTCARD HISTORY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

POSTCARD HISTORY. It was about forty years ago that II. Raymond Louis Wolowski, a well known French politician who was by birth a Pole, proposed in the National Assembly that tho postal card should bo recognised as a Iegitimato form of corrospondonco in Franco, and this was tho beginning, so far as is known, of tho,postcard as wo know it to-day. But tho real discovery of tho post card as a means of correspondence, it is said, was mado long beforo by two young lovers living in distant villages. It was at tho timo before stamps exist ed, and tho receiver of a lottar paid the charges to tho postman. Tho daughter of a poor farmer received from timo to timo a lotter from her lovor, a soldier, but she was too poor to pay tho postago, and after having examined it intently sho returned it to tho postman. On tho envelope wero scratched numbers and figures, to gether with tho address. . Ono day a neighbour, taking pity on the young girl, offered to pay the postago. Tho girl refused, but the n...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HIS MAJESTY'S VISITING CARDS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

His MAJESTY'S VISITINC CARDS. Fow people, perTiaps, aro aware tliat tlio King lias his own visiting cards, like anyone olso. It is etiquetto wlion tho Sovereign is abroad that ho should leavo his card on minor members of tho Royal family with whom ho is staying, and also at the Embassies and resi dences of Chefs do Mission. This King George did during his recent sojourn at Berlin. Tho late King caused to bo inscribed on his visiting card all tho principal titles that wero his own, such as King of tho United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, etc. Hut King George prefers something short er, and has inscribed on his "paste f board" King Georgo V. only, which, I after all, is quite sufiicient, seeing ' tiiat his namo is probably bettor known than that of any other monarch in tho world. A man is but what ho knowoth.— Bacon.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A JAPANESE TRADITION. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

A JAPANESE TRADITION. Sogitora Temple, in tho province of Ise, Japan, is the scono at a certain f period in each year of \o peculiar rite dedicated to the worship of Acala nathir, tho faithful servant of Buddha. Tho rito is known, as a "goma"—a corruption of Sanskrit "homa"—or "burning." Buddalv taught that tho causo of suffering is desire, and thore foro tho priosts of tho Shingo, a Ja panese soct of Buddism, kindlo a fire to consumo all human desiros, at tho sumo timo offering prayors to Acala natha. In ono matter tho rito may bo said to defoat its own ends, for it attracts a crowd of farmers full of desiro to obtain embers or ashes from tho firo which is supposed to have con sumed all desiros. Tho tradition is that tho possession of an ember or ashes from tho sacred firo ensures a farmer good crops.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. Father was of an economical turn of mind, and hated extravagance with all his heart. Ho had sinco the earl iest days triod to instil ideas of a similar nature into tho brain of his small son, aged eight. . His grief was terrible to see'When one day he came upon tho budding'eco nomist stuffing himself with a slico of bread generously covered with a layer of butter which was surmounted by a young mountain of jam. "My boy," said ho, sadly though severely, "suroly you do not realise what you are doing; yet you ought, by now, to comprehend the wicked extravaganoo of eating buttor and jam together I" "Why, I'm being most economical, father!"' ropHed tho young hopeful. •'Don't you soe that I'm making tho same slice of bread do for both?"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PETTY COMMERCE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

PETTY COMMERCE;. Trado was bad, very bad; and Mr. Buggins, tho chief grocer of the dis trict, found liiB takings bocoming small er overy day. All his old customers seemod to bo leaving the neighbour hood, and no new ones arriving. Even old Mrs. Robinson, whom tho firm of Buggins had supplied with tho neces saries of lifo for many years, had not been noar tho shop for weekB. Ono morning, howovor, she again en tcrod tho door, and Mr. Buggins, do lightod, hastened to attend to her in person. "And what may I get for you to day?" he inquired. "A ha'pennyworth. o' soap," came the reply. Mr. Buggins' face was wonderfully expressive of outraged feelings; so was his answer. "A ha'pennyworth of soap?" he re torted. "Certainly. I suppose you'll bo

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) OUR STORYETTE. AN INTERRUPTED PROPOSAL. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

(All iuautfl rkssbvio.) OUR STORYETTE. AN INTERRUPTED PROPOSAL. Suzanne wont to tho looking-glaBs and surreptitiously replaced an errant lock. Ho would bo down soon, and sho must look lier best. And Suzanne's best was worth' looking at. Slio criticis ed carofully tlio soft rod hair, one mass of wavos and tondrils, the Boftly rounded pink cheoks, tho straight little noso, and lips formed for kisses. Then sho lookod deop and long into hor violot qyos. "I wondor whether I really am prot ty?" sho said. " I think there can bo no doubt on tho subject," said a deep voice behind her. Suzanne blushod, and blushed be comingly, ovor hor small pink ears and round lior plump whito throat. "I novor thought you wore a spy," she said, haughtily. Ho could not keep his oyes from her face—ho thought Ivor tho swoetest thing in all tho world. His eyas would hove told Suzanne this fact if sho had only been sufficiently composed to look at him. But sho was not. "Spies aro generally oxecuted, aren't they?"...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) COMPLETE STORY. THE MYSTERY OF BASINGHALL CASTLE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

(All Riqhts Rxbdkyxd.) COMPLETE STORY. THE MYSTERY OF BASINCHALL CASTLE. By FRANCIS GRIBBLE. Author of "The Rod Spell," "Sun light and Limelight," "The Lower Life," "Stromboli,"The Pillar of Cloud," &c. The American Consul was accustom ed to callers who expected him to ex ecute commissions outside the ordiuary range of consular duties; but ho was nevertheless surprised when a fellow countryman drifted in upon him, and announced his business thus: "It's about a dream I had on the other side. I've come all the way from Los Angeles about it. I thought, maybe, you'd be able to help me to figure it out." > "It seems to me," was the other's reply, "that the man you're looking for is not the United States Consul, but the Prophet Daniel. Perhaps his address is in the London Directory— perhaps it isn't. You had better look and see." He pushed tho bulky red volume across the table, with the dim idea that he was dealing with a lunatic, and that this would be the best way of • humori...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WAY OF PEACE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

THE WAY OF PEACE. I sought the way of peace. So long; I sought and far, A place where nought might enter in My happiness to mar. I sought and sought in vain Until, with fainting heart I turned about, and tound a place Where I could bear a part. In lifting heavy loads, And sharing otjicr's woes. And in the path of duty, lo I I found my heart's repose.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POETRY OF THE WEEK. AS YOU GO THROUGH LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

POETRY OF THE WEEK. AS YOU GO THROUGH LIFE. Don't look for Haws as you no through life; And even when you line) them It is wise and kind to be somewhat blind, Ami look fot ihc virtue behind them; For the cloudiest night lias a hint of light Somewhere in its shadows hiding: It's better by tat to hunt for a star, Th;\n the spots on the sun abiding. The current of life runs ever away To the bo?om of God's ureat ocean. Don't set your force 'gainst the river's course. And think to alter its motion. Don't waste a curse on the universe, Remember, it lived before you: Don't butt at the storm with your puny form. But bend and let it go o'er you. The world will never adjust itself To suit your whims to the letter, Some things must go wrong your whole life long. And the sooner you know it the bet ter, It isi'folly to fight with the Infinite. And go under at last in the wrestle. The wiser man shapes into God's plan. As water shapes into a vessel. —rrom Toems of Cheer," by Ella Wheeler Wilcox.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AMERICAN HUMOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

AMERIOAN HUMOUR. 9 Olsquloting.—".Maminu, why did you tnarry papa?" "So you've beeun to wonder, too?" Hoarly Always.—Willio: "Paw, what is luck?" Paw: "Luck i/3 wliafc makes the other fellow successful, my son." * « * « # Ingenuity.—The man glared at the telephone. Ho would fnin relievo his mind, hi/*1 there were ladies present. "Why," he ut length exclaimed in geniously, "should I say 'hello,' when tlio reverse is true?" a - » • • Tho Other Way.—Mrs. Sourspito: "When I gavo you that solemn warn ing against marrying, I said that soma day you would regret it. That time ivill come, mark my words!" Mrs. Newed: "Tho time has come." .Mrs. S'onrspite (gleefully): I thought so! Then you regret your marriageP" Mrs. Newed: "Oh, no"! I regrot tho warning you gavo me. It kept ma from marrying for nearly a year." « « » » • Now Edge on an Old Saw.—"Tho pen is mightier than tho sword," said the ready-made philosopher. "I don't quito see how tho adage applies to current conditions," cgnv meritod t...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Nelson's Tomb In St. Paul's. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 28 March 1914

Nelson's Tomb In St. Paul's. Tlio black marble sarcophagus which forms Nolson'e tomb was originally dosigned by Cardinal "Wolsoy for him self. Tho cardinal arranged with tho Italian sculptor Benedetto to construct •B magnificont tomb of black marblo and gilt broiiKo, Cromwell subsequent ly had tho bronzo molted down, and for tho melted motal £G00 waB paid. Tho black marblo tomb lay in tho un finished Chapol of tho Confossor, at Windsor, rcstorod by Honry VIII., but loft incomplete. It was King George IV. who suggested tho uso of it for Lord Nolson.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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