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Elephind.com contains 21,400 items from Rochester Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Totalisator. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

I ■ The Totalisator. Another decided movement for the introduction of the totalisator has been made. There can be little doubt but that the trend of public opinion—or at all events of the sporting section of that public—is strongly in favor of the machine. And this altogether apart from the question of the large amount of money that would accrue annually to the funds of the various philan thropic Institutions. The reports of grace meetings in other States where the totalisator is in vogue have shown that very large divi dends have been paid on the. win ners of races of an important cbaiacter. No small proportion of the racing public is also tired of sesing its money go into the pockets of men who neither toil nor spin, yet who are arrayed with a glory that Solomon, iu his palmiest days, might well have envied, and who to all appearances fare sumptuously every day. To many people it presents itself as a striking anomaly that the-religious bodies should ap parently ally themselves wit...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. BREEDING AND FEEDING OF COWS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

DAIRYING. BREEDING AND FEEDING OP COWS. Professor Gustance, of South Aua tralia, ill the "Garden and Field," hai the following hints upon dairy farm lng: — There are several branches of farm ing capable of extension and improve ment. Irrigation would undoubtedly be of great benefit, the improvement of dairy stock would.be profitable, to secure the best results obtainable thG dairy farmer should give as much care to the breedlug of the cows for milk production as to their feeding and improvement of his land to the same end. Not one, or even two, of these points, but all three of tliem, require attention, if the dairy farmer is to ob tain the most profitable results. The average yield of well-managed cows varies from 400 to COO gallons of milk a year, according to breed and size, Indeed by good feeding and careful management the average yield of a small dairy breed like the Ayrshire may be raised to 600 or more gallons annually, and by corresponding treat* | ment of the larger breeds ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FACTS ABOUT MILK. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

FACTS ABOUT MILK. In the course of an excellent paper on butter-making, by A. C. Shirley, dairy instructor at the winter dairy conference, Palmerston North (New Zealand), the following information was given: — It is a well-known fact that milk, when in the udder of the cow, is sterile except when the glands are diseased, and that bacteria which gain access to it afterwards are the cause of all decomposition. Therefore, I should like before proceeding with the manu facture, to point out to the dairymen present, the different sources through which these bacteria gain access to the milk, and the rapidity at which they multiply when there, as it may tie a guide as to how to fight these undesirables. To do this, I shall sim ply give the results of experiments conducted by scientists. The first is a research made by Professor Backhaus, giving the num ber of germs which in five minutes (ell from the air to the ground in an area of one square metre (a square of ?91u. sides):—In the open air...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Secret of Cleopatra's Wonderful hair. DISCOVERED AT LAST IN AN OLD MUSTY BOOK. PRODUCES STARTLING GROWTH OF NEW HAIR ON MAN'S HEAD AFTER TEN YEARS OF [?] [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

i 5tt"l Of CUopatras Won [ dcrful hair. D1S^LDRm?tAT LAST TX an ^ u^> MUSTY BOOK. xk\\LV1iiCtpAKTT*'iX^' GRtW'l'" <Jlr APTFKTrJ v °X MAN'8 1IKAO . LKTl'N YEARS (ir nu | hi examining some of tiie °'^ I Italian museums of antiquities, au i Mmkau traveller accidentally 1 Sliced iu L,atiu the words " I Wow beautiful hair." A closer | inspection revealed an old hair fQ1" I aud below it was noticed I War i\ was the formula which 1 WispMta used aud to which she | Wei wouderfully beautiful: ! W,tiavck, heavy bait, which bad I "MtliAo do with btv beiug the I ^%t\xautttul woman in the world, I usioshy led the traveller to copy I "^formula, aud he gave it to a I mta4 who had been bald for ten I After some difficulty tbe I ?of the formula made up I Wu flight modifications by _3 I ^fflist, aud after using it six I ^'ctss his head became entirely I ®v«dw\Ui a startling growth of I ^ this so impressed biui I ^.5 ^ve the formula to several 1 iouruals, and newspapers, I .</ ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Good Send-off. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

A Good Send-off. Mr. Newlygilt (to Mrs. N., who is cultivating society): Well, my dear, and how did you get on at the Vere de Yere's? Mrs Newlygilt: Well, they were a little cold and stand-offish at first, I thought, but, oh, so nice when I came away. Dont' try to analyse women; love them for what they are. Don't pick them to pieces as you would a toy, for you can never put . them together again. He whose heart is set entirely on money-getting cannot be other than sordid. An ideal husband usually belongs to some other woman.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
III. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

III. "Thank heaven the wedding's over," remarked Colonel Brown as he sat at breakfast the following morning. "We've had the house upset for weeks and now we'll hope for peace and com fort. It's a great relief to feel we got through the day without a single hitch. I never saw Mary look nicer. Wonder how she and Alfred are getting on? Now that the little girl is married we will hope that unfortunate propensity of hers——" "A telegram for you, pater," said Harry, coming into the room. His father tore it open. His face grew crimson as he slowly read out: "Mary lost yesterday at Swakeleys Junction; wire if with you to Non-tip Hotel, Strand, London." "Well, of all the " he began ex plosively. "It's no earthly use your getting into a temper, my dear!" said the mother resignedly. "But this really out-Herods Herod! Couldn't she even get through her wedding day without " "It may not be her fault. We have no particulars yet." "We know that Alfred is at the hotel alone, looking and feeling a pre...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

II. The instant after Alfred had got out of the train at Swakeleys Junc tion a lady had entered Mary's com-' partment. She was stout, grey-haired, and wheezy, and the flrst thing she did was to shut the windows. Alfred detested shut windows, so Mary took a hasty prowl down the corridor to see if there were an empty compart ment into which she could move their belongings. She quickly ascertained that there was no room elsewhere, and, sudden ly remembering that she had left her handbag on the seat unprotected, hur ried back. The stout lady was step ping down on to the platform, but apparently she was returning, for her wraps were piled up on the seat she had chosen. She had not a pleasing face. Mary snatched up her bag, feeling she had been rash to leave it there unguarded. "I hope my five-pound note is safe," she thought, utterly forgetting that Alfred had taken charge of it. She searched for the note, naturally failed to find it, and grew crimson with an ger and distrust. "The wretc...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Not a Banquet. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

Not a Banquet. A story Mr. Taft tells is about a number of old men who, having been schoolboys together, thought it would be an excellent plan to have a New Year banquet together in memory of old times. The most enthusiastic "old -boy" among them went to the banquet ex pecting to have a pleasant evening talking over schooldays, but he was bitterly disappointed. One man had a troublesome heart, and he would talk of nothing else; another had gout; another had a bad liver; another was worried about his kidneys; another's indigestion mono polised his attention; and so on, each had trouble with some organ or other. When he returned home somebody asked the enthusiastic man how he had enjoyed the banquet. "l5ancjuet!" he exclaimed bitterly. "It wasn't a banquet, it was an organ recital!"

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE COLD BATH. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

THE COLD BATH. If you do not feel warm after a cold t!i you liad better not take it, for it is doing you no good. We do not take cold baths for the sake of cleanliness; cold water may wash off tlie superfi cial dirt, but it does not extract the dirt from the poree. We plunge into cold water solely for Its invigorating effect, and unless we get that invig orating effect from it we had better seek the invigoration in some other way. Cold water applied suddenly drives the blood from the skin by constrict ing the capillaries. It 'also adminis ters a light shock to the nerves, which has an awakening effect upon all the muscles of the 'body. The capillar ies being closed, the resistance of the blood to the heart pressure is greater. The heart responds to this resistance by greater effort; it beats more rapid ly and with stronger force. The blood ■surges through the body more swift ly, and forces its way through the capillaries as soon as the cold that has closed them is withdrawn. This ca...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PATTERN FOR CHILD'S KILT AND JUMPER. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

PATTERN FOR CHILD'S KILT ANI> JUMPER. Many a mother will welcome this simple little frock. It is easily made and would look well in any material. Tlie jumper is separate, the kilt be ing given on body lining. It repre sents "Everylady's Journal" pattern No. 137—cut for little girls of 4 and 6 years. This pattern may be bought for ninepence from local pattern agent, or will be sent post free to any ad dress if ninepence in stamps is sent to Dept. "A," "Everylady's Journal," 37 Swanston-street, Melbourne. State number of pattern, and size required a penny stamp is sent to above ad dress a 4S-page catalogue will be sent to any reader who writes "send free catalogue."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THINGS MIGHT HAVE BEEN WORSE. The Tale of An lii-fated Five-Pound Note. I. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

THINGS MIGHT HAVE BEEN WORSE. The Tale of An lii-fated Five-Pound Note. B1 HELEN LEWIS. All her life Mary Brown had shown a peculiar faculty for getting into trouble. Even in childhood ahe gave evidences of this deplorable charac teristic. When no one else dreamed of whooping, or mumping, or measling, sure as fate, Mary would hob-nob with the fiends who produced these unpleas ant symptoms, bring them home, and j nearly die of their attentions. At the age of ten she entered into confidential relations with a burglar, j an indiscretion which resulted in the loss of all the family plate and jewels, and some painful hours spent by her- j self gagged and locked up in the coal- j cellar. ., J Later, she had to be denied the usual girlish pastimes. If ever she bathed, someone had to plunge in after her and, with considerable risk to his own life, save her from drown ing. If ever she rode, either she came to grief or there was a horse to be paid for. If ever she played hockey, either she -i...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

PURE BRAND on Toilet Soap ensures iiijjli tjualily. THE EQUITY TRUSTEES, EXECUTORS, i AGENCY CO. LTD. Subscribed Capital Reserved Lability . £135,000 . £100,000 Guarantee Fund . . . £10,000 Registered Offices: 85 QUEEN STREET, MELB. Board of Directors: EDWARD FANNING, Esq., Mer chant, Chairman. W. H. IRVINE, Esq., K.C., M.P., Barrister at Law. DONALD MACKINNON, Esq., M.L.A., Barrister at Law. R. G. McCUTCHEON, Esq., M.L.A. STEWART McARTHUR, Esq., Bar rister at Law. This Company is specially em powered by Act of Parliament (No. 978) to act as Executor, Administra tor, Trustee, Receiver, Committee un der the Lunacy Act, or Attorney under Tower, and to take Transfers of Existing Trusts. Income Collected. Funds Invested and Estates Managed or Realised. JOEL FOX, Manager. C. T. MARTIN, Assistant Manager SKIMS, WOOL, HIDES, TALLOW, ETC. Send direct to W'm. Hatigfeton and Co. STORES: 278-282 SPENCER STREET MELBOURNE. Save commission and get Highest iPrleeH and Prompt Returns. AGENTS, FISON...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Not for Grown-Ups. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

Not for Grown-Ups. He is one of those men who toy the exercise of great economy and the seizing of every opportunity have amassed a considerable fortune in a most unpromising district, and he is building himself a bungalow—building it with his own hands, that is. The other day, he was discussing the ar rangements of the place with me, and I asked where he proposed to put the bath. The question seemed to astonish him. • "Bath?" he repeated. "We're not thinking of having a bath. You see, it's not as if we had any children. There's only me and my wife." To "avoid criticism, my boy, say nothing, be nothing, do nothing. Mother: Here is the man for that ciock to be repaired. Get it for him. Tommy: Where is it? Mother: Upstairs, of course. Tommy: 0H, I thought it had run down.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHANGE OF FOOD. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

CHANGE OF FOOD. When-the chickens have got nicely feathered—say, about five or six weeks old—they will need to be put upon a different food regime, accord ing to the breed. Those . that are short of leg and very feathery will need plenty of rice, which, although it does not produce bone, does influ ence feather considerably, not alto gether. because of its own nutritive qualities, bo much as it does t>y its ac tion. in keeping the blood cool, and thus allowing the other foods given to be assimilated with ease and-com fort without the skin become dry and irritated, and thus acting as a deter rent upon feather growth. If stimu lative and nourishing foods are given, the blood becomes over-heated, and the skin is apt to become dry and harsh, and when this is the case the feathers do not break nicely.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TONICS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

Tonics—that is, harmless tonics—» are good at times when given to ra tionally fad fowls. The healthiest birds are liable to become run down, especially during the breeding season, and a little good tonic given at the right time is a pick-me-up. But to make use of tonics and spices indis ereatly, with the object of securing high egg yields Is equivalent to thrashing up a horse so that the pas senger may catch his train. The ob ject in view may be achieved, but the poor horse invariably suffers. "While Doubt stands still, Confidence can make % fortune. Good manners include not merely pleasant things said and done, but un pleasant ones left undone. Temper, not trouble, makes the misery of most men's and women's lives. To be witty at tlie expense of some body else is sometimes positive cruelty."' Jealousy is the fear or apprehen sion of superiority; envy is our un easiness under it.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN'S WORLD. TO KEEP A WIFE HAPPY. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

WOMAN'S WORLD. TO KEEP A WIFE- HAPPY. Keep all pre-nuptial promises. Give her a bank account—however small—as well as yourself.[ Go into town oftener than once a week. When away from home write or telegraph daily. Take her with you on business and pleasure trips. Be more polite to her than to any other woman. Remember that she likes flowers, sweets and books. Don't criticise her hats and dresses. If you have only a shilling you don't waste it when you spend it on her. Be faithful in all things, generous, considerate and loving.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

POULTRY. A duek muet be two an3 & half ?a&n •Id before it is Feally. matured. NSver make a sudden change of tht "lill of fare, especially to laying ducks * Wiien tiie crop is liard and unyield ing there is dauger of the bird becom ing crop-bound. When the dischargee are streaked with blood it is time to give preven tives for diarrhoea. Oyster sholle can be run through a misher with bones and old china. Thej *11 make good grit. Do not wast© the potato peelings; they are best part of the potato, and make good poultry food. When the hen seems giddy and "turns round and round she is probablj suffering from apoplexy. Do not waste time with old, worn oat birds. They should be killed off. Only keep profitable pullets or young hens in their prime. Always .have the nests low, so that the hens can step rather than be ob ligated to jump up or down, and ft flat perch is best, for it is comfortable to the feet and a good support for the breast. Fowls will act as scavengers and ri...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. POINTS IN CHEESE-MAKING. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

DAIRYING. t . _ • • ' POINTS IN CHEESE-MAKING. For hard-pressed cheese, where a ripe milk is required, it is best to use night and morning's milk mixed. In the case of'making cheese from sweet milk, such as some varieties of un pressed cheese, it is often most satis factory to use one meal's milk only. The rennet must be very carefully added to milk that is overripe, as the acidity in the milk stimulates the ac tion of the rennet, making it work very quickly. Unless great care is exercised, the milk will ;be over-stir red and rendered useless for cheese making. It is most important that the curd be of uniform consistence throughout, and this is obtained by judiciously stirring in the rennet and taking pre cautions to prevent the temperature of the renneted milk falling. Keep the vat covered, and water a little warmer than the milk in the vat jacket. Whey from cheese making may be set in tanks, and the cream skimmed off the next day, before using the whey for pig-feeding. Whey cream ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Football. GOULBURN VALLEY LEAGUE OPENING OF THE SEASON. ROCHESTER EASILY BEAT TATURA. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

Football. GOULBURN VALLEY LEAGUE OPENING OP.THE SEASON. ROCHESTER EASILY BEAT TATURA. The opening match, was played against Tatura ou Wednesday, as was^the cate last season. The con vincing ground was, ' however, filtered, Rochester, being' 'at home" to Tatura. on this ocaasion. The composition of the Rochester team has altered somewhat from that of last season, owing to the fact some protniuent players left the district. Bennett also was an absentee, and regret was expressed at his uon-ap pearance. Lovers of- a fiue foot baller are, however, hopeful that he will again don the colors at no distant date. Miles O'Neill too stood out, but whether it is to be a pefmartency or not is yet uncertain. Those who have - admired bis play iu ^the past, hope that he too wi[l respond to~ the" "call of the ball'' later on. Another notable absentee was Green, who was detained owiug to business reasons. With the latter three exceptions the team was about the best that could be obtained although of c...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO GIRLS WHO FAIL TO PLEASE. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 22 May 1914

TO GIRLS WHO FAIL TO PLEASE. To girls who, for some undefined reason, fail to please in a geiieral way, though here and there they may gain a friend, an admirer, a lover, and who would like to feel a conscious power to attract a certainty of social success at any time or place, there is this to be said. To begin with, a soft voice and a ciuiet manner are desirable; sympathy is not easily expressed in boisterous tones or a bustling-mannered demean or. Given these, there are few precepts' to remember. Do not ask a series of deliberate questions, but try to ascertain what subject interests your partner in con versation, and if you know little or nothing of it, be sure that an intelli gent listener is always appreciated. Even the dullest-seeming man, the most raw youth, has some coign of vantage where he feels at home; and if you lead him to talk of this, and you demonstrate the fact that he in terests you, you increase his self-re spect, you convey a pleasant tingle of self-satisfactio...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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