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Elephind.com contains 66,464 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

&1l3S$ag!fciifitv "MOOCHA BUENO AMERICAN," SAY CUBAN FANS WHO THINK RIGLER IS "BEST EVER" GROUND KEEPER ' Charles Rigler, the National league umpire, worked in Cuba after the close of the 1911 season, in the games between the National league teams and the natives. Rigler is delighted with the country and the people. I worked in Cuba last fall and had a splendid time. When it comes to entertaining American guests, the Cubans are at their best. I got a letter from Rigler the other i day and it was amusing. ' "The other evening," wrote Rigler, "an American started a I fanfest with me. He asked me which city I preferred to work in. It afterward developed that he was a Bostonian, and naturally he expected me to reply immediately, 'Boston.' I "was in a jesting mood, and answered that I preferred to work in Havana. "He asked why I preferred Havana, and when I told him it was because' I couldn't understand a thing the fans were saying he almost keeled over. "He saw the strength ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

wimiswwwwinpiBii! quired the youngster of the vet, swelling with indignation. "If you ever hit like that fellow, you' wont have any trouble sticking up here," laconically replied the veteran. ''That is Dan Brouthers." The youngster almost keeled over. He wasn't as wise as he thought. o o CALENDAR OF HOPES 1912 JAKUAJSf Li January" Ivmprec frlv'eoal ujjply-will Jasi :-UlIW EEKP.UAET In. reiruorjfliopei3imrie rH st no cii maid. - ttASLGH. JnLlaxcihih.erSlbb cox ybssr "to-wait Till larfe xoraoJc&3 . .AERII La April jSLjx&xafagm iiie, Baseball o&oaai rwili bcpiixi. nAy LJWIkiEua: LNarfcore'b Tair un3earwejr. ' JUNErIn leafy June,rejoicc ffe?elLiaiow -where T&j&alcatzxpcta. JULY fx'fcn.d&fft liope in. ihcrtJuixhe price at ice j-woeriiie xooiih.- Jttrgasr nvAcgjU5t :fxnl-m ncfi "too poor lo pcs" ior -voitie3 ae-aoliare' "tour. SEPTEMBER, This mcm,n. ill atc eij wi-tii orailinATaca- LAnoiilier Ted lieyfc pennan'L -race...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

yWV Jf'JJ ' ' -. w "- - OCTOBER. Perhaps iJlQ&txnj' rnoxuerf ha&k; This 'tame 111 ie,-fc on Conine, JIokCfe.. 1 t.ope -fckarb eixill. Noveoalur lanugo Tlie; dsuh.'to txiy bmyChnsi-m&s Tifcnga ZDEOEMBER. Dcoeiixbeir'Ah.,1 tope 1m "heares loJxves and. leacrn-eaio't'hgry&egr. f4 5l)cH A HEADACHE1. AS THE. CLOCK STRUCK TWELVE AMD "THE BMcU WAS GATHERED ROW40THE FESTIVE BOARD, GRATEFUL gUSTAVE AROSE AND EHQUIREDT"JUST BECAUSE WERE ALL FULL. OF HOPS, DOES THAT MAKE 1912, A LEAP VEAR-? BURRS WITH THATCRACIcd ICE I gjJWfyMWWWW tt B o o WOMEN GETTING SCARCE Some of you fellows are going without wives if you don't get busy pretty soon. You don't think' so? That's because you don't know. Fact is, men are increasing much faster than women in the United States. Already there are 2,691,879 more men than women. There will be at least that number of lonely old bachelors using shingle nails to hold their suspenders and consuming canned goods pr restaur...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

WSP?y?5y5? r EXTRA!! THE BABY NEW YEAR-IS A SUFFRAGET ' N? 7VTPi4fi , ', im THEY EXPE&T M It is not easy for a housewife to resolve to remain satisfied with the husband Fate has given her. A New Year resolution is never kept as long as a borrowed umbrella. 1 & FR

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

THE DAY BOOK 500 SO. PEORIA ST. e398 Vol. 1, No. 83 Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1912 TEL. MONROE 353 One Cent BUSINESS INTERESTS ON HARRIMAN AND I. C. LINES WANT STRIKE SETTLEMENT Financial Loss the Cause Strike-Breakers Issue Notice Denouncing Rank Conditions on Harriman Lines Men Forced to' Live Like Hogs. Aroused by the financial loss they are suffering, business interests throughout the district affected by the strike of the shopmen on the Illinois Central and Harriman lines, are demanding immediate settlement of the strike, and in the majority of cases urge that the roads concede the strikers the right of system federation. It is pointed. out that the roads themselves have one of the strongest and tightest federations in existence. At a citizens' meeting a.t Centralia last night, addressed by President J. W. Kline of the Blacksmiths' union, a resolution was adopted commending the strikers for their peaceful attitude, and indorsing their demand for the right to federate. The resol...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

companies say that if the strike is not settled shortly they will be compelled to move their headquarters to some other city. The statements in the Item afe significant as showing the revulsion of public opinion, which is now turning to the strikers. When the strike was first called the Item printed an editorial criticizing the strikers, and demanding that they return to work. Vice-President Park of the I. C. thought so much of it that he had it incorporated in the little booklet explaining the road's position in the strike, which was sent over the country. The following letter, printed in i he papers at Ogden, Utah, shows .he conditions that obtain among the strikebreakers on the Harriman lines: To Our Fellow Strike-breakers and All Concerned: We, the undersigned strikebreakers, wish to let the public 'to. of the conditions at the bhops of the Oregon Short Line R. R. located at Ogden, Utah, and all shops throughout the Harriman System. We wish to state that we have been treated as ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

There are one hundred or more men willing to quit this strike in the Ogden shops alone, but they have not the means to get out of town with. Yours respectfully, (Signed) Wm. E. Kelley, B. C. o- GREETINGS FROM THE CZAR McDonald, Richard Smith, B. F. Merrick, Jos. McLospi, W. E. Bohlman, Victor Anderson, and Frank Kromer. Issued by Ogden Local Advisory Board System Federation, -o !v . v AmZ ZaJ W5) 6 I I Skffk -From New York Press. m

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

CHICAGO DOINGS BRIEFLY TOLD How's your head? Frank Sokowaki, 8840 Escanaba ave., celebrated New Year's by firing "blank" cartridges. One bullet hit Edward Konieck, 6, in leg. John Petros, 14, 3110 N. Claremont, shot himself in the hand welcoming 1912. William Hanks?, 1117 Fullerton ave., city fireman, struck and seriously injured by auto patrol at Throop and W. 22nd streets. Twelve families driven into cold by fire in Driscoll flats, 3110 W. Harrison street Damage, $5,000. Seven men broke into poolroom at 806 Davis street, Evanston, yesterday, to play free pool. Jailed. Mrs. Myron Cottrell, 4454 Drexell blvd., hid three diamond rings in her husband's old clothes. Mr. Cottrell gave the clothes to a poor family Christmas. Detectives are trying to trace Mrs. Cottrell's rings. Robert Popp, 4944 S. Western ave., taken sick on street car Sunday, and died at hospital few hours later. Hold-up tried to rob John Linder, 4307 Park ave., last nighf. Linder "help-up" the hold-up, and took his re...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

CUPID WINS IN CROSS COUNTRY RACEDenver, Colo.', Jan. 2. "It's no ise. Your father never will consent. Meet me, Savoy, Denver, Roland." This telegram, received by Miss Alice Clifford, daughter of Hamilton W. Clifford, wealthy stock broker, at her home in New York, Friday afternoon, started a cross country race between father and daughter, and brought about a wedding at the Spvov hotel behind locked doors and to the accompaniment of violent kicks administered to the portal by Miss Clifford's irate parent. Roland Birch, a New York stock broker, sent the telegram. Miss Clifford began packing as soon as she reveived it. She left her home without being observed, but dropped the telegram in the hallway. Her father picked up the telegram and read it, just as Miss Clifford climbed into a taxicab. Father grabbed his hat and coat. Miss Clifford caught a Rock Island train for Denver, at the New York depot. Fifteen minutes later, father caught a Burlington train for Denver. Miss Clifford reached...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

m joq tgary n ' if Miss Helen Gould is the only one of the women who says she doesn't want to be a deputy sheriff. She says she has troubles enough of her own. Mrs. Young, wife of a millionaire banker, but better known as Mme. Nordica, the grand opera singer, has no doubt abou accepting. "Assuredly I shall accept." she said today. "It is only right that women should be given the opportunity to act as guardians of the peace." Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont declared that she would be more than pleased to receive her commission. The only thing at which she would draw the line, she said, would be raiding gambling' houses. "I don't think women ought to be expected to do that. But .there is plenty of other work for women deputies. The women, you see, don't want to oust the men ; they want to work side by side with them, each doing his or her kind of work." Mrs. James . Lees Laidlaw, chairman of the borough of Manhattan for woman suffrage, said she would accept the ''honor" of being a deputy, while...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmsmmmemsmssssgm "'NOBODY-LOVES ME; I'M GOING OUT IN THE GARDEN ND EAT WORMS." FROM WELL KNOWN PICTURE When you eat cranberry sauce with your holiday turkey, you think of it -as a tart, delicious ad dition to the menu. But if vou could know the aching backs, the toiling of women, the child labor that must be measured up with the production of a cranberry crop, perhaps it wouldn't taste so erood.

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

ORIGIN OF THE ESKIMO Christian Leden. a polar explorer for the University of Christiana, who is in Chicago for several days prior to his return to Norway, in an interview said he was investigating the origin of the Eskimo. It is his belief that this family is of the' same branch as the American Indian. A peculiar feature of all these most northern inhabitnats is that when born the babies have skin even more white than the Caucasian. "But there is a tiny black spot in the middle of the back," he stated, "and it is this spot in which their dark complexions originate. The spot grows larger and at the same time less strongly colored ; finally, it spreads over the entire body." Here is a discovery that is worth nursing. In olden times, brass collars and other badges of servitude were used to mark the difference between master and man. Civilization, while It taught humanity a whole lot of things, did not disturb the desire to dose up the gulf between the boss and his lave. Brass collars a...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

WISCONSIN THINKS PETER AND JOHN HOBBS' EDUCATIONS AT THEIR TRADES IMPORTANT 9fI4:4:4c4:C4E4:4:4!4:4:4:4:4:4;4; xJ BBBRD By W. G. Shepherd. Staff Correspondence. Madison, Wis., Jan. 2. Peter Hobbs. as we have said, was 21 years old and his ambition, as he toiled daily in the machine shop, was to be a good machinist. In fact, he wanted to be a better machinist than the men about him. How to accomplish this was a puzzle, for how could he learn from men who knew less than he wanted to know? One day a lecturer from the university extension course of Wisconsin came to the factory and from him Peter learned that the state would teach him all there was to know about the machinist's trade, for a very small fee. by correspondence. If he would get together 15 or 20 young machinists who wanted to know more about their trade, the university would send a regular teacher to them once a week, H

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

said-thc.4ect.urer. and they would receive personal lessons It didn't take John long to avail himself of the correspondence plan and before many weeks he had gathered the class and every Thursday night they met to hear the lessons of the machinist-expert from the university. John Hobbs, jr., ton. '"ound out that the state of Wisconsin was anxious to make a first class pattern maker out of him. He was an apprentice in a pattern shop, but under the law his employer gave him five hours a ' week on salary to receive lessons in government, history and other school courses from special teachers sent nut by the board of education. It was a case of the school teacher following John into the factor-, but the lessons lie received promised to make a better skilled laborer out of him. The nexi article will tell hbw John Hobbs, farmer brother was helped in his business of farming bv the state of Wisconsin. What's the Use. Sage Know thyself. Cynic What's the use? It's not an acquaintance from who...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

SW55H355 STREET COSTUMES WITH AUSTRALIAN CHINCHILLA - ' - -w-nirTWinT - From far off Australia comes the gray fur that is one of the fashions of this season. This pretty animal skin is used effectively on a dark brown street costume. The material is slightly flecked with cream, giving the mixed effect when seen at close vision. This costume has a bias air from the slash of the skirt. The coat is lapped well on to the side where it fastens and the buttons of this garment extend on a diagonal line with those on the skirt. The Australian chinchilla is formed into a collar on the coat and a deep revere of the brown cloth goes to the line where the jacket is fastened. o o SHOT $50 IN DOG Swoyerville, Pa., Dec. 30. Somebody's big black dog- is carry $50 in bills. John Vincent stuff- ' ed the ?oO in the barrel of his old shotgun for safe keening-. Likelv it ! would be there vet if that prowling dog hadn't happened around. In his anx iety to put the dog out of business Vincent forgot about ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

agggtocccggojogc fcVw-y.wMP9MyMgaartsfiteWTiy m SHE'LL BE QUEEN OF HOLLAND SOME DAY "BY UND1iaOI C JNOEKWQOX) This is a new picture of little Juliana Wilhelmina, princess of Orange and heir to the throne of Holland, aged two years and eight months. The photograph was taken by her mother, "Queen Wilhelmina, in the gardens of the royal palace. s.

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

HOW J. P. MORGAN FREED CHINA The Chinese Rebelled Rather than Let J. Pierp. Get a Grip on China Like the One He Has on the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave. Sad as may be the necessity of 'doing so, it is necessary to take from Willie Randolph Hearst the credit of freeing China, and place that credit where it belongs with J. Pierpont Morgan, and his ally, the government of the .United States of America. The story of J. Pierpont Morgan's activities in this regard brings to mind those legends which tell how wolves suckled babes, and which have roused in suspicious persons the thought that perhaps the wolves suckled the babes with ever in mind the thought of larger and choicer titbits in time to come. Doubtless Mr. Morgan did not know he was freeing China, and doubtless he is going to be extremely pained to discover he has done so. Also, he is going to lose some money by it, which is one of the consolations of the situation. Consider the facts: A few years ago, the Manchu gov...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

jTjyTf.tf !. Msfl3SWii dared not go back on their secret contracts with the French, British and German governments and financiers, and they were afraid to increase the loan. They protested to the United States government against Morgan's suggestion of part of the pie. Then - did William Howard Taft, president of these United States, send a personal cablegram to Prince Regent Chun which forced the matter to an issue. The "railroad loan" was increased. Morgan was allowed to make a Joan, and further was given permission to build a section of the "development of China" railroad, and to supply the materials for the same. This was a cute arrangement, inasmuch as Morgan thus made two profits. He made a rake-off from the handling of the loan, and he made a juicy profit by supplying the railroad construction materials from the Morgan Steel Trust. While Taft; Knox and Willard Straight were telling the Manchu government where it got off in the matter of borrowing money, President Taft personal...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

fmmmmmmgmmmmmmsm upon, was that little Pu Yi had 'been "deceived" by a naughty member of his cabinet, who had turned the country's railroads over to wicked foreigners. Evidently, the thing that was sticking in the craws of the Chinese people, and making them rebel, was the handling of the railroad question. Yes, J. Pierpont Morgan freed China! But there is something ineffably sad in the spectacle of the government of "th,e most enlightened nation of Christendom" aiding the schemes of Morgan to such an extent that a groaning people arose in rebellion, and shed their "blood and devastated their country, in order to throy off the Morgan shackles. -o o- IRE. CAR WAS CROWDED AND THE SHOPPERS WEKE TANDlrte OH SAcH OTHERS FEET, V4HEN. A meavV sex J-adV cried out, " F THE CONDUCTOR MocJvfl POWM FAKES, WHAT YULC TRE. MOTOR-cop f t KNOW IT OMUW COST A DOLLAR OECAOJli TH-e-PRICE TAG IS -STILL ON IT. HOOK FOR THE SUPREME COURT, SAYS REPORT J C 3-rtlAUfi Judge W. C. Hook. From Washington conies ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 2 January 1912

J4LiJJ',f-ry"iy"lgtfgcai;ifa r& iyimM Bca&iQ9E9'jB SHE ANSWERED BACK Miss Elder You fancy yourself very clever, I dare say, but I could give you a wrinkle or two. Miss Younger No doubt you could and never miss them. Tit-Bits. o o Spark Plug. Mollie He always" wears a high hat when he goes to see the girls he's courting. Chollie Calls it a spark plug, I suppose? Yonkers Statesman. quite All for Love. Mr. A-rNorah seems gone on the postman. Mrs. A Gone! Do you know what that girl does? She mails herself a postal card every evening so as to make sure he'll call next morniner. Boston Trans cript. o o Good Work. Little Alice was going on a journey, and Lily, her negro nurse, was kneeling before her, polishing her little shoes. T want ter do 'em real good baby, so they'll stay black while you are away." Baby watched her seriously a moment, then remarked pleasantly. "I tell you, Lily. God shoe polished you real good before you went away, didn't he?" Judge. In Cultur...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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