ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Farmers Voice Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 25,370 items from Farmers Voice, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
25,370 results
Agricultural Courtship [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Agricultural Courtship A potato went out on a mash , And sought an onion bed ; Thats pie tor me ! observed the squash , And all the beets turned red ; Go way ! the onion , weeping , cried , Your love I cannot be ; The pumpkin be your lawful bride ; You cantelope with me . But onward still the tuber came , And laid down at her feet ; You cauliflower by any name , And it will smell as wheat ; And I , too , am an early rose ; And you Ive come to see ; So dont turn up your lovely nose , But spinachat with me ! I do not carrot all to wed , So go , sir , if you please ! The modest onion meekly said , And lettuce , pray , have peas ! Go , think that you have never seen Myself , or smelled my sigh ; Too long a maiden I have been For favors in your rye ! Ah , spare a cuss ! the tuber prayed ; My cherryshed bride you ll be ! You are the only weeping maid That s currant now with me ! And as the wily tuber spoke , He caught her by surprise , And giving her an artichoke , Devoured her with his e...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Some Facts About Maize [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Some Facts About Maize It is unfortunate that the name of our great cereal was at an early period in the settlement of this country confounded with the generic term for ill food grains , and from this circumstance came the adoption of the name corn instead of its proper name , maize , which distinguishes it from all other grains . In England any grain which is commonly used as food is called corn , and wheat , oats and rye come under this appellation , while in this country we say corn , wheat or oats , giving each a distinctive name . Maize is a corn in the strict sense of the word , but its true name should be used , although it will probably be a long time before this becomes common . However , it is the one groat product of America which always will be peculiarly American , and we need not fear successful rivalry on the part of any other nation in the production of it It is the one crop in which Americans are supremely interested , and more than any other is the foundation upon ...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

August 6 , 1898 Terrible Boils They Came Thick and Fast--Till Cured by Hood s Sarsaparilla . My brother had terrible boils on the back of his , neck . As fast as one would get better another would come . He became very much , emaciated , and began taking Hood s Sarsaparilla . One bottle made a great improvement , and when he had . taken two bottles he WHS cured . CARRIE D . ERVIN , Mound City , Illinois . Hood s Sarsaparilla IsthelSestr-infacttheOne True Mood Purifier : Hood s Pills cure sick headache . ii 5 cents . A College Education MBH is the best life equipwKjBP ment that can be proQ gjJg vided for a young man ^ JBjJJ or a young woman . ^^ GBtt Everybody cant afford ^ SHH ^^ afc it , but every man who ^^^ BpV ^ keeps a dozen or more ^^^^* cows may easily do so . ^ B A SHARPLES SEPARATOR of the Mttl » JHm Giant or Safety Hand ^ U BB ^^^ pattern will , in a short ^ Hjj ^ HP ^ time , make extra- but- ¦ ^^^^^ :.. ter enough to pay for a college education for each member of yourfami...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Garden and Orchard [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Garden and Orchard Cabbage Late cabbage is a crop that makes its growth almost entirely after the hot weather is past in the fall . The plants may seem to be making a very slow growth during July and August , but they should not be neglected on this account . Top dress the plot with manure and cultivate frequently to get the manure worked into the soil and when the fall rains come the cabbage will begin to grow and continue to make weight until freezing weather . Cabbage is a plant that can hardly be over-fertilized and it is entirely impossible to give it too much cultivation . The soil between the plants should be kept thoroughly stirred and as fine as dust all the time . The cabbage worm does its greatest damage during the hot days that are now due , as such weather is most favorable to its activity . It is a pest that is very easily disposed of . Cold water poured on the cabbages will kill it . The water should be right from the well and it should be poured on liberally . Where ...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
SPROUTS [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

SPROUTS Onions are a paying crop and do particularly well on prairie sod the first year it is broken . The sod should be plowed shallow and harrowed with a light harrow so as to make a shallow seed bed . Onions are shallow rooted and will flourish greatly on a fresh sod of this kind , and , there being but few weeds to bother , the crop is cheaply raised . It is safe 1 , 0 say that I n here is not a farm in America upon which grapes can not be made to flourish with less labor than any other fruit . They are relished by every one and no stomach is so delicate that it will not assimilate them , yet there are thousands of farms in any state whereon there is not a single grape vine . A story is told of a Texas fruit grower who sent his best fruit to northern markets and his seconds to near-by home markets . At the end of the season he discovered that his seconds Had brought him the largest returns . It is safe to conclude that this man is able properly to apply this lesson . Potatoes sh...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Managing Millet [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Managing Millet When grown for hay care must be taken not to allow millet to get too ripe before cutting , but in good season it makes a splendid feed for all kinds of cattle and sheep , but if allowed to get too ripe many consider it detrimental to the health of stock to feed it to them . For hay it should be cut as soon as the seed has fully formed . If delayed until the seeds begin to harden more or less will have passed the best stage . The management in cutting should be much the same as with clover . Commence cutting after the dew is off in the morning ; let lay until late in the evening , and then rake up and put in small cocks . Usually it will be sufficiently cured to haul in by the next afternoon , but if the weather is cool or cloudy it is best to defer a day longer rather than run the risk of storing away before it is thoroughly cured . Like clover , millet hay is somewhat difficult to stack so & s to keep in the best condition , so that whenever it is possib...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Nature ' s Berry Patches [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Nature s Berry Patches In a good many but limited sections the berries that grow wild on lands that are not cultivated are gathered for market in large quantities . In the semibarren hills of southern Ohio , where the land is too rough to cultivate and is allowed to remain in a state of nature , the natives , who are a rude and uncultivated class , gather thousands of bushels of blackberries , which grow profusely on the hills . Blackberry harvest to these people is the gala-time of the year , when the boys and girls make a picnic of berry gathering and find in the sale o . f them means to get money with which to buy things needful and ornamental . Every morning crowds of people , young and old , may be seen going along the hills with buckets , and toward evening they come trooping into the nearest railway town heavily laden with the spoils of the day . Carload after carload of berries are shipped out of this section every summer and sent to far-away cities . In many places blueberr...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Strawberries [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Strawberries The West Virginia experiment station has recently published a bulletin giving the results of two years experiments with strawberries . The following is the summary of the conclusions arrived at during this extended test . It should be remembered that a strawberry that- is first-class in West Virginia may not be good for anything in a black prairie soil , but the most of these conclusions will apply to the whole country . Especial attention should be given to the advice concerning securing local varieties that have been tried : No land owner should be without a strawberry patch . No fruit will return a greater income for time and money expended than the strawberry . Pistillate plants usually bear the largest fruits , but perfect flowering sorts must be planted close by to insure perfect pollination and a crop of fruit . It is the remarkably early and remarkably late crops that return the profit in strawberry culture . Care in grading the fruit pays better with the strawb...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

pAAAAAAAAAA ^ \ Plant Food . { i Every crop must have the right r < j kind of food and plenty of it . Only f i three plant food ingredients > S | t j need be considered in ^ >^ L 1 a fertilizer—phos- ^ ^ ^ j k ^ phoric acid , >^ ^ ^ Lm \ 1 nitrogen , s ^ w SB ^^ - ^ t / r & lK ^ t j ^ ii V * ^^ These (? i llV I s must be \ \ ^^ y ^ properly . baU . I * ^ / anced . Too much of £ i . ^ one and too little of an- r ( j / other will cause partial or com- f i plcte failure . jl J T 7 PT 717 KosiillB of numerous experiments L % FiVJZX . * lii , winu- t-ll ri-U of fertilwere ujion T i viuiuii * I | -O | IH in triveii in nur illustrated imiiiplili-ts , . 4 Iliese liunks , Mil free for Hie unking , will enable • ™ any fm-im-i- to use his fertilizers with greater Willi * * J oiny anil tin-uter ( irofit . k II HUMAN KAl . I WOHKS , ! B Nassau St ., New York £ IFVWVVVVVWVVV The Master Mechanic j ) f the Morrison & Cass Paper Co ...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Live Stock and Dairy [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Live Stock and Dairy Fattening Range Steers In this paper the principal facts contained in Bulletin No . 58 , Section 2 , on the fattening of range steers are given in condensed form . The experiment proper began on Dec . 7 , 96 , and ended April 19 , 97 , thus covering a period of 131 days . Some 18 days were occupied prior to Dec . 7 in getting the animals accustomed to their rations . Nine steers were used in the experiment ; They were all two years old and were grades of the various beef breeds . Individually they were good types , but were a trifle long in limb and coarse in bone . They had been reared under semi-range conditions , that is to say , they pastured on the range all the year , except in the severest weather , when they were fed range hay . They had never been handled save when they were branded and could only be driven by means of a horse and rider , that is to say , in cowboy fashion . They were unloaded at the substation at Crookston , Minnesota , about September...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
UNKNOWN [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

ryjROC-JERSHY nOOS-RefflBtere * stock . - Scad lamp for ( 4-page catalogue . Illustrate * , ¦ rices and history . Useful information to yonaf ( neden . J . H . STONEBKAKKR , Panola , III

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Selecting Dairy Cows [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Selecting Dairy Cows In selecting a dairy cow , says frotessor Haecker , we should try to obtain an animal with a dished face , prominent , lively eye , long body , deep through the middle with thin neck , light shoulders , prominent hip-bones , high pelvic arch , thin thighs , with high arching flank , giving plenty of room for a good udder , which should extend well forward , and well out and high behind , giving long and broad surface attachment , to the body , with good-sized teats , well placed ; the legs should be short and clean , and there should be ample heart and lung room . It may be interesting to explain what is meant by certain of the points named . For instance , why do we call for a dished face in a cow ? This is the reason . The dishing of the face is caused by the prominence of the eyes on either side . A large , full eye is one of the several signs of a strong nervous temperament . By a strong nervous temperament we mean a large supply of nerve force , and this is...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Pulling Horses [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Pulling Horses A contributor of The American Cultivator tells how he cured a horse of a confirmed habit of pulling by giving him a slack rein and letting him cover as many miles as he wanted to , pulling him down whenever he started to run . He adds that he always thought when he saw a pulling horse that there was a fool horse at one end of the reins and a fool driver at the other . The habit of pulling is a most uncomfortable one for both horse and driver , and it is one that no colt should ever be encouraged in . Once a horse becomes a puller he gets so accustomed to feeling a tight bit in his mouth that as soon as the strain is slacked he becomes excited and pushes ahead until Anally he breaks into a run . Nine times out of ten the habit is formed by vicious methods while training the colt . The trainer holds hard on the reins and touches the colt up with the whip in order to make him get his head up and make a lively appearance . If the colt is cold blooded and not at all excita...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

WON THE BIAS . Y tfSfl & l Thats the secret of the 5 K Bias Girth Horse M tenvl Rlaiikcts . The girth In on the bias—that means VL wH oroRse ( i It works automatically . Tlio blanket IKIII cant slip . If 7011 pull one side , the other nlda IffWillvM kecPs ttl ° blanket from sliding , and vet Hdoosut Ifc 2 / Nj 7 fl bind the horse . Ho could at displace it if he 1 ! Bias Girth HI via Hors 0 Blantets ftr 0 ma 4 ° 1 Q Ml styles—to St any iwmlUn horse—to suit any purse . Ask vour dealer for rlTjJW filA Bias Girth Blankets , and look for the trade * WtmJX mark . A tinok on Hie subjeot sent free . g ^ jj ^ y wjL A YUES & SONS , Philadelphia . SEND rOR SOUTH DAKOTA FARMS Completely descriptive of tbs best agricultural and dairy section on earth . It costs you nothing —Just send your name on a postal sard and will Interest you . _^_^ ^ iiMav E . It WRIGHT , Armour . S . D . DO YOU OWN A HORSE ? NO MORE BROKEN NAME STRINGSBAMPLE ^ tM ^^^ ^ STAH BY MAIL ^ r ^ AME FASTE...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Poultry and Bees [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Poultry and Bees Points from Poultry Keepers The average farmer thinks it a waste of time and feed to pay any attention to poultry ; as a natural consequence they are generally poorly cared for and poorly housed . Before the days of creameries , the eggs , poultry and butter constituted the wife s income , to furnish household supplies , consequently the cows and chickens got what nothing else would eat , or what they could And for themselves , as it was considered the height of folly to give feed of any value to them simply to fill the wifes pocketbook . The product was carried to the country store to be bartered for goods . The creamery and cheese factory have turned the cow over to the other side of the house , now , and she , at least is tolerably well cared for . But poultry still remains in the womans possession often times to roost in the trees or on the woodpile and feed with the pigs , what they cannot get by scratching for , and the farmer unless his wife has the good fort...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Common-Sense Bee-Keeping [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Common-Sense Bee-Keeping At a Wisconsin farmers institute Jacob Huffman , Monroe , Wis ., made some suggestions to bee-keepers what are worth remembering . He said : While working with your bees is a good time to do some hard thinking and prevent more hard work next year . The most essential thing to do is to prevent waste . There is no occasion for a well person in this country to be poor . Waste in some form makes the difference between poverty and comfort . Are any of your hives , boards , feeders or other implements of the apiary unnecessarily exposed to the weather ? What becomes of your broken combs and pieces of wax ? Do you allow the moths to destroy your empty combs ? If so , get your hand on the stop that controls waste , and bear on ; get on it with both feet if necessary ; it will improve your circumstances . Dont chase rainbows . You think you are an inventor , but you are not . That new hive , frame or other contrivance that you have been planning so long drop it , and...

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
UNKNOWN [Newspaper Article] — Farmers Voice — 6 August 1898

Prize-Winning Poland Chinas : /„ » VJ . dari . O . A . WIUUETH , Seneca , 111 .

Publication Title: Farmers Voice
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
x
Loading...
x
x