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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 345 Literature, which the mighty arms of departed ages placed high upon "a pinnacle of glory," has been torn down from its high estate by the ruthless hands of modern atheistic writers. Literature, which was to be the Polar Star that would lead men on to higher deeds, to better, nobler lives, has now become the insinuating seducer of the mind, the ower of evil. Instead of holding out to man the dignity of the present and the glory of the future life, it hands to him the bitter cup of Skepticism. Poets, who should be the missionaries of God, have made themselves the priests of Venus and teach man to rise in re bellion against his God. There can be found in the ranks of the law men whose re ligion is the gospel of artifice, whose conscience is public tes timony men who make use of all the wiles and practices of duplicity that they may attain a position of honor in the world. Enthralled by the perverse teachings of the day, they are straying from "the ways of uprig...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

346 The Indian Advocate. The miserable men, longing to free themselves from this bondage more hateful and galling than slavery itself, seek pro tection and strength in the formation of , unions. But even there, materialism has reached with polluting touch. Social ists hold out to these poor, struggling men the most glorious and fantastic promises, making use of them to carry out pro jects hateful in the sight of God and of man. They fear nothing, dare everything; they laugh to scorn the idea of law, of religion, of morality. Taking unto themselves the name of anarchists, flaunting the banner of blood and slaughter, they make use of every means suggested by their savage pas sions to overcome authority and enthrone license and crime in the garb and name of liberty. Here we stand in the presence of those evils which threaten to overwhelm the world and hurl it into the abyss of moral degradation. There is a great and pressing need of some thing which will tear from their pedestals these...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 347 relative or in the immediate, and of awakening them to a con templation of something beyond it." It is this religion that will impart to students of the law that true knowledge of the great Law-giver of the universe; without which knowledge they can not truly live up to their profession or fulfill their mission of leading fallen humanity to reflect the justice of God.' It is this religion that will inspire in the surgeon the desire to save from death a human life. To save it, not because by the saving he may attain to wealth, to honor, to fame, but be cause of the deep love for all mankind which is implanted in his heart. Unless he be imbued with this love, this charity, no surgeon can live up to the true glories of his profession. It is this religion that will impart to men of power and in fluence those lofty principles of morality and of justice; which will teach them to give protection to the feeble and oppressed, to respect in every man his dignity as a ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

348 The Indian Advocate. n P How Amy's Petition Was Answered. - J T was the month of November. The rain had fallen heavily all day, seeming to increase as night's shadows darkened. The wind tossed the branches of the leafless trees, making progress slow and difficult for the few travelers who chanced to be abroad. The gaslights burned dimly, cast ing shadows in every crevice of the way. On C street, a man of some twenty years could be seen pushing his way forward until he halted at the door of a cottage brightened by the ruddy glow of a fire that crackled on the open hearth. He paused on the threshold, his dark eye peering forward. The room was neat and cozy. A large rocker was drawn close to the grate, awaiting the arrival of its evening occupant. Two girls were busily engaged in embroidering a piece of linen, while naught broke the silence except the ticking of the great clock that had marked the flight of time for many and many a year. The silent observer at last entered, and was...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 349 tropolis of England. Fortune seemed to smile upon her child and his undertakings. Luxury reigned in his home, and , as wealth grew more and more, the present was employed the future forgotten. Finally came the blow that leveled all the joys of this happy circle. False friends had proven j , treacherous, and James Clifford was without money or home. Day by day he again planned to conquer, but to no avail. All that remained was the cottage we have seen. Accustomed to luxury, he sank under the blow, leaving his children, Charles, Nell and Amy, to fight the battle he had failed to endure. The girls had obtained work from a large firm, but Charles had been less fortunate, and for this reason was, as we found him, on that November evening. After they had finished their slight repast and put the room in order, the girls resumed their task, leaving their brother to watch them with anxious eyes. Out and in flew their busy needles, till at last Amy broke the silence: ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

35 The Indian Advocate. of November came, and yet nothing had happened to strengthen the hopes of the little petitioner. That morning Charles started out again on his search for employment. Nell remained at home to finish her work, but Amy wended her way to the little church, resolving once more to repeat her petitions. The cool, crisp air had begun to warm with the sunbeams, and Charles Clifford was still hopeless. At last, quite abandoning himself to gloomy thoughts and not caring whither he went, he wandered on. As he turned the corner of G street, he was touched on the arm and thus ad dressed: "Where are you going, young man?" "I am in search of employment," he answered, "and, being most unfortunate, am well-nigh hopeless." "Hopelessl and so young? Come, my son, you must not speak thus." "My hopes were high, but since " "What is your name?" "I am Charles Clifford, an orphan, with no one to care for me but two sisters, who now await my return." Charles then proceeded to tell his ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 351 A Friend in Need, In his "Recollections" Aubrey de Vere tells of a young man who was tried for murder, having killed a member of a rival faction in a faction fight. The Judge, reluctant to sen tence him to death on account of his youth, turned to him and said: "Is there any one in court who could speak as to your character?" The youth looked around the court and then said, sadly: "There is no man here, my Lord, that I know." At that my grandfather chanced to walk into the grand jury gallery. He saw at once how matters stood. He called out: "You aie a queer boy that don't know a friend when you see him!" The boy wps quick-witted; he answered: "Oh, then, it is myself that is proud to see your Honor here this day!" " "Well," said the Judge, "Sir Vere, since you know that boy, will you tell us what you know of him?" "I will, my Lord," said my grandfather, "and what I can tell you is this that from the very first day that I ever saw him to this minute, I never kn...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

pwsnTp r " TiyfT("Fi5a?' -r 352 The Indian Advocate. LOCALS: Rev. D. Germanus, O. S. B., is staying at the Abbey for a while. He is soon to go East. Rev. Fr. Aloysius, O. S. B., who is assisting in Texarkana fro tern., came home for a day during the month. Rev. D. Hippolyte, O. S. B., left the Abbey on Oct. 6th for Paola, Kans., where he is to act as Chaplain to the Ursuline Nuns. October was ushered in by a severe rainstorm and bad weather gen erally, which retarded, for a time, cotton picking and wheat sowing in this section. The season for hunting is now open, and the detonations of fire-arms are wafted to us on every breeze, and the rabbits, quails and other small game are now compelled to "go way back" and lie low. Rev. Mother Katherine Drexel, O. B. S., visited our schools on Oc tober 2nd. She was accompanied by Miss Drexel and Ven. Sister Patricia, O. S. F., Superioress of the Convent of St. Elizabeth, Purcell, I. T. We now have daily mail connection with Asher, via Vista. Th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate Vof. XIV. DECEMBER, 1902. No. 12 Christmas Bells. (Acrostic.) By Marcella A. Fitzgerald. s sound waves of music that ebb and flow Merrily, merrily over the earth; East wind and west wind, as chill they blow; Ring, musical bells, ring loud, ring low, Ring out the tidings of Jesus' birth. m, till the northlahd and southland hear Christmas' psalmody, praise and peace, Mope and the love that shall know no fear Radiance of Bethlehem's starlight clear, n whose rare splendor all troubles cease. Sing the glad Gloria over again; Tell to each listening, faithful heart Message of mercy sublime to men, And all countless favors given them then Sing the great blessings Christ will impart. Till answ'ring your summons so loud and long, 0 Bells of Christmas, we seek His shrine, As shepherds of old, a rude, eager throng, Led by the angels with midnight song Like them to worship the Babe Divine.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

353 Tin: Indian Advocati:. CHRISTMAS ...S TOR Y... I N the palmy days of the famous University of Tubingen there were two young students, two souls whose congenial character had soon united them in the bonds of an intimate friendship. Stan islaus Grandoski hailed from Posen, and bore deeply impressed upon his heart the memory of cruel oppression long suffered by his native coun try. An ardent love of his holy Religion, and an intense patriotism thus combined to draw in bold relief upon his countenance the noble aspirations of his soul. Bernard Tenkle, on the other hand, a Westphalian by birth, was naturally gifted with a delicate sensitiveness that soon made him the sympathetic confident of Stanislaus. As time went on, purer and closer their friend ship became. Oftentimes, in the course of their studies, they would set a few moments apart to read of men famous in the military an nals of Poland, or of the protracted martyrdom of this mor ally unconquered race, ever united in love of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocatk. 354- tion agianst the indomitable courage of Catholic Poland: such were the living souvenirs which Stanislaus liked often to recall. Other times, Bernard would temper with poetical charms, the somewhat melancholic dispositions of his friend. Bern ard, as we have seen, hailed from the borders of the upper Rhine. From his native village, he had seen the majestic flow of the great River; and, far away in the horizon, the snowy peaks of the Alps But nearer yet, his imagination had often wandered amid the ruins of some feudal castle, or the deserted stalls of an old minster. Hence, with Stanislaus, he would often read of olden times when Religion and Poetry found their highest expres sion in the lives of God's Saints; when, all along the Rhine and its tributaries, monasteries of Monks and convents of Nuns spread far and wide the sweet odor of sanctity and the vivify ing inspirations of mysticism. Gersen and Tauler and Rus brock, the hermit of Grunthal Green-valley ha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

355 Thk Indian Ahvocatk. is reflected; and, because the beauties of Nature are also an image, imperfect though it be, of God's infinite grandeurs, nowhere, better than in the lives, or the mystical writings of the Saints, do we find exemplified true symbolism, that is a keen sense of God's incessnnt influence upon the exterior world and our own interior life. Outside of this point of view, the whole of creation falls from its destiny; in it, on the con trary, lies the secret of happiness in this woild and glory in the next. Gloria in cxcelsis; , in terra pax hominibus Of a less sensitive nature than Bernard, Stanislaus had, however, been accustomed to breathe the pure atmosphere of their conversations. He had thus come to understand the meaning of this commonly ignored principle of true Science, the germ of which is instilled by God in every human soul, but which develops itself only in the pure of heart, in whom it enkindles the fire of Divine love, and germinates the rare flower o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

'"' . Thk Imiian Aivocatk. 356 U they p.issed the gates of old L'uhtngen. As they looked for ward on tlie broad highway, winding as a white ribbon through mounts and vales in the direction of Schaffhausen, the sun, emerging from the horizon, seemed to spread over Nature a mantle of glory wjth the first rays of its light. Bernard's countenance was radiant, as he beheld this scenery; and Stan islaus looked at the dew-drops hanging from the trees by the wayside, now glittering as crystals, then disappearing even as silvery stars that twinkle in the night. The sun was becom ing gently warmer, and our tourists went on their way, while theirimagina.tion carried them forward, in anticipation of the grand sceneries they were going to admire. In the evening, about sunset, a cooler breeze suddenly passed over them; and behold they found themselves stepping upon a plateau. At their feet lay Schaffhausen with her pretty chalets; while a little farther to the east the lake of Constanz displayed ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocaik. 357 -4- --- d 44 -

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

Thk Indian Advocatr. 35 hi: r V Two days later Bernard and Stanislaus reached the fa mous monastery of Einsiedeln, "Einsiedeln in the dark wood" as it is called, because surrounded by two long rows of wood ed heights, at the end of which risesthe, majestic Peak of the Mythen. The sentiment of a well deserved rest enhanced for our young travelers the pleasures of the cordial reception they met within the abbey; and they doubly rejoiced that they had arrived on time to celebrate, on the morrow, in this hal lowed Sanctuary, the great feast of Christmas. There stood before them a living monument of the Ages of Faith, around whose name clustered the memories of many who, since the days of St. Meinrad its founder and Bl. Nich olas de Flue, have ever kept alive in these regions the Spirit of Faith, and the Sacred fire of religious fervor; an old Sanct uary, where everything still breathed the pure atmosphere of a never forsaken tradition. Long before midnight the large church of the abbey ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

359 The Indian Advocate. i beautiful stanzas, telling their elevated minds of "the mys teries of God's Eternal Word, Who, when the fulness of -time had come, was made anathema for the redemption of man." As the echo of the last stanza died out in the lofty naves, the belfry-clock struck twelve. In one of the lateral chapels an elaborately designed curtain was removed, unveiling in the trembling glimmer of some unseen light an artistic re production of the Holy Crib. A succession of blue mountains with snowy summits formed an imposing background to the grotto, with deep .crevices between huge rocks, and the audi ble.murmurof an artificial waterfall; and far, far away in the south, a star, of unusual brilliancy could be seen, while the scarcely perceptible forms of Arabian palm-trees seemed point ing to the star, the star of the Magi. . The organ in the gallery whispered gently some pastoral songs in honor of the Divine Infant, while the officers were preparing for,. the celebration o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

y The Indian Advocate. 360 grant smoke from three golden censers went up to mingle its sweet perfumes with the mystical waves of the Sacred Music. Three organs, happily seconded by a full orchestra, rendered with delightful harmony the impressive modulations of the lit urgical chant; while a number of young children carefully trained in the monastic school, also joined their angelic voices in hinging the Kyrie and Gloria in excetsis. The Epistle and Gospel were then sung according to the ancient modulations of Tutilo, a musician Monk, who rlourised about the Tenth century in the celebrated Abbey of St. Gall. After the offer tory, the whole congregation joined in a powerful chorus to answer the stanzas of the " Adcste 'Fideles" sung by the choir children. Meanwhile, the beautiful ceremonies of the Pon tifical were carried out with the most edifying precision and gravity. Amid the deepest silence resounded the voice of the cel ebrant, and all became still, listening to the words of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

361 The Indian Advocate. experienced a double sentiment of joy at being able to receive Holy Communion on that memorable night, in which they be held one of those beautiful spectacles they had so often dreamed of, when reading of what religious life was in the Ages of Faith. The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass had now come to an end. The procession of altar-boys and officers slowly retired from the Sanctuary. From the galleries once more the ever new melodies of Christmas resounded in the naves, while the peo ple, their hearts filled with a saintly joy, started for home un der a pleasant, starry sky; and long, long after the church doors had been closed, there still remained in the church the red, trembling light of the Sanctuary lamp, and a vase of in cense burning slowly at the foot of the Crib. On the following day, the offices were celebrated with the same splendor and the same devotion. The Abbot held it an honor, on this solemnity, both to preside over the ceremonies and to break h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1902

The Indian Advocate. 365 a wealth of unbounded knowledge, and, to souls that thirst for the perfection of Divine Love, opened the inexhaustible foutainsof Mystical Theology. A rapid but penetrative glance at the densley furnished shelves disclosed to Bernard many a volume, many and old manuscript which it would have been a delight for him to peruse attentively and meditate, so much did his soul ever lend a ready ear to themes of lofty specula tions. But time would not allow; and they left the Library to visit the extensive buildings of the Abbey and the School connected with it. There was in the School a very spacious hall especially set apart for a recreation-room; on Christmas day it was adorned with garlands of mistletoe around large pictures of sceneries or portraits, these being the works of advanced students in the Art School of the Abbey. At the sound of the College-bells, according to an old custom, all the members of the community gathered in the room, and assisted at a Chr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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