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Title: Kerang New Times Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 19,116 items from Kerang New Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SWAN HILL TO KERANG AND BENDIGO. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

SWAN HILL TO KaRAl;AN AND BENDIGO, Daily a m swan Hill (dep) ... - ... 1 take Bogs . ... - .. 1 M:-ystic Park ... ... - .. .. Lake Charm ...- .. ,... Fairley ... Kerang arr . . ,, dep .... .. . 6 South Kerang ... -- . ... * Tragowel .2. .:: 6 21. ... Macorna .. 6 35 ... Minch- ., : .. 650 -... .. Pyramid Hill .. 7 10 .. ... Mologa 7 33 ... Mitimo (arr) ... ... 745 ... ... (dep) ... ... 85 ... ... Prairie ... ... 8 22 .. ... Dingee .. ... . 836 ... ... Tandara ... ... 8 48 ... ... Raywood ... ... 9 18 ... ... I Sebastian ... 9 32 ..." l Woodvale ... . . 9 48 . .. ... Eaglehawk r ... ... 10 20 ... Bendigo (arr) ... 10 45 ... ,, (dep) .., 12 ... .. 1 Melbourne arr .. 3 55 ... * OnMon Wed a FPri this train will leave Bendigo at 6 2?5?m Melbourne at 9 59 p m NOTr--On Fridays a car is attached to the goods train leaviu g at6 a m and arriving at Kerang at 8 a m, returning from KersoM and arriving at Swanz Hill at 9 pm

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHILLINGOLLAH & ULTIMA TO BENDIGO [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

OHILLINGOLLAH & ULTIMA TO BENDIGO Tuee -Thur Mon .&Sat only, am am Chillingollah 6 40 1 Waitchie 7 10 1 20 Gowan ... 7 35 - Ultima ... 8 40 2S30 Meatian ... 9 5 2 53 Lalhert ... 9'40 3 30 Cannie ... 10 10 4 Quambatook 10 47 4 40 Mon Wed Fri Boort ... 12 45 6 10 'Bendigo arr 6 65 11 BENDIGO TO ULTIMA AND OHILLINGOLLAH. -Mon Wed and Fri am Bendigo 1. 15 Boors ... 5 20 Quambatook ... . 6 50 Cannie .. 713 Lalberb ... 7 44 Meatian .. 8 9 M W F S. Ultima 9 10 Gowan ... 9 27 Waitchie ,, 9 57 QhUllUgollah ,,. 10 35

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KERANG AND KOOND[?] TRAMWAY. Daily excepting Friday[?] [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

KEANG AND TRAMWAY Daily exceptog -Kerang (dep) ?0 Yeoburn 9 Hinkson's " 910 Gannawarra .. 0 Koondrook (arr) 11 ,, (dep) 1116 Gannawarra 11~i Hinkson's 1110 Yeoburn II1 Kerang priday Of7 im Kerang(dep) d ' 811 Yeoburn "' 89 Hinkson's ' 840 Gannawarra 9 Koondrook (arr) 10 Koondrook (dep) 0115 Gannawarra '" 10 Hinkson's ' 104 Yeoburn " II1 K" g

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KOONDROOK LINE. Mails Close Daily for [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

KOONDROOK LIN.E Mails Close Daily for a.m. p.m. - Koondrook ... 8.15 3.45a Barham ... 8.15 8.45a Gannawarra - 3.45a Teal Point - 3.45a Hinkeon's - 3.45a. a Fridays 4.45 p.m. -Mails Arrive from koondrook ... 12.5 6.35a Barham ... 12.5 6.35a Gannawarra 6.35a Teal Point ... 12 52 Hinkson's ... 12.5 a Fridays 7.45 p.i.

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SWAN HILL LINE. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

SWAN HILL LINE, Mails Arrive Close daily 1p.m. p.m. SwanHill .H... 3 1.50 Lake Boga ... 3 1.50 Mystic Park ... 3 1.50 Lake Charm ... 3$ 1.50 Fairloy ... ... 3 1.50

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KERANG POST OFFICE. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

KERANG POST OFFICE. The following are the times of clos Ing and arrival of mails for the under mentioned places : MAIN LINE. MAILa CLOsE DAILY For p.m. p.m Melbourne ... 1.30 - Travelling P.O. 1 30 10.30 Bendigo ... 1 30 :10.30 Mitiamo ... 1.30 - Mologa ... 1.30 Pyramid Hill 1.30 10 30 Mincha : .. - 10.30 Macorna ... 1.30 10 30 Tragowel ... 1 30 10.30 M'Phail's ... 1.30 MAILS ARRIVE AT POST Or?ito. rom a.m .m. Melbourne ... 6 3.20 Travelling P.O. 6 3.20 Bendigo ... 6 3 20 Mitiamo - 3.30 Mologa - 3-20 Pyramid Hill... 6 3.20 Minoha - 3.20 Macorna ... - 3.20 Tragowel ... 6 3.20 M'Phail'e - 3.20

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A GREAT ENGINEERING WORK. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

A GREAT ENGINEERING WORK. The completion of the Los Angeles aqueduct, says the '"Scientific Ameri can," marks the successful ending of an arduous struggle with nature in its most rlgged aspects of mounltain and, desert, and with powerful and subtle private interests for the pos session of a priceless supply, of water. The ten aqueducts of ancient Rome were marvels of engineering skill and durability; but their construction stretched over a period of five cen turies, against the eight years that hive elapsed- since the Los Angeles aqueduct was first proposed, and'the length and dimensions of the ancient Roman aqueducts bear no comparison with that of modern Los Angeles. The longest,of the Roman aqueducts was 62 miles, while the Los Angeles aque duct is 254 miles in length, from the intake on Owens River to the city limits of Los Angeles. The irrigation. aqueducts of the Inca Indians of an cient Peru, one of which was 360 miles long,'are among the wonders of the world, especially so w...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A CHINESE FUNERAL. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

A CHINESE FUNERAL. A most curious sight is the funeral. of a Chinee, and in describing the same it is necessary briefly to relate the mode of procedure just prior to and after death. When a Chinese becomes danger ously ill, if the relatives consider there .is no hope of his recovery, his face is turned towards the window, and once thus turned, he seldom re covers. In passing, I think it just as well' to mention that in China it is not necessary to have any medical train ing or pass any qualifying examina tion to become a doctor,. but the aver age Chinese medico has usually pre pared himself by careful perusal of books' written for. that purpose pre- vious to establishing himself as a curer of ills. Of course the success of his practice depiends largely on "his ability to cure: But there is no law in China to prevent an unqualified man from practising. After death, the body is taken into the parlor, wherb the corpse is dress,. ed in special clothes-the best the" family are able to pr...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"BOBS" AMONG THE BULLETS. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

"BOBS" AMONG THE BULLETS. "'Talk about your- commanders," said Tommy Atkifls, "Bobs is the boy for me. I found out what he was in Afghanistan. ; My company was dig ging trenches, and while finishing one the Afghans began firing, and the bul lets whistled close to our heads. "Well, there was a kid in the company that couldn't have been over 18. Never ought to have let him 'list. He was always growling and kicking, and at the first fire, down he went fiat on his face, and laid there. Then along came 'Bobs,' cool and easy, and sees the kid. 'Hello, there!' says 'Bobs,' 'What's the matter, you fellow, down there? Get up and fight with your company.' 'No, I can't!' whines the kid. 'Can't,' says 'Bobs,' jumping down into the trench and ,hauling the boy up. 'What's the. mat ter with you that you can't? Are you hurt?' 'No, sir,' says he, 'I'm afraid of gettinig hit.' 'Well, you're a fine soldier!' ,says the general. Then he looked at the boyish face of the lad, and his face softened. 'I sup...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STRENGTH OF MAN'S MUSCLES. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

STRENGTH OF MAN'S MUSCLES Experiments made with thousands of men show that the muscles of the average man have their period of in. crease and decline, whether he uses ;them much or little. The average youth of seventeen has a lifting. power of two hundred and eighty pounds. By his twentieth year his strength has increased to such a de. gree that he should be able to exert a lifting-power of three hundred and twenty pounds, while his maximum power is reached in his thirtieth or thirty-first year, he theiWfbeing able to lift three hundred and sixty-five pounds.' At the expiration of his thirty-first year his power begins to decline, very graually at first, having fallen but eight pounds by the time he is forty. From forty to fifty the decrease of power is somewhat more rapid, having dropped to three hun. dred and thirty pounds at the latter age, the average lifting power of a man of fifty, therefore, being slightly grpster than that of a man of twenty, After fifty the decrease in stre...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A MAN WORTH HELPING. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

'A MAN WORTH HELPING. The following story has been told in the American Press and vouched for as true of an Irishman named Mike Halloran, who had lost his sight in a factory where Paris green got into his eyes. For fourteen years he supported himself by carting ashes, and then misfortune overtook him. He was not a contractor, but a day laborer, and no one helped him in his sightless task except a small lad, who led the. horse. "They calls me 'Happy Mike Hal. loran,' omin' to. me mindin' me own affairs an' keepin' a cheery look to the world," Mike said to a Pressman; "but I feels it pretty sober inside o' me whin I be lookin' the gayest.' "How much work can you do In a day, Halloran, as compared with a man who can see?" "As much as. anny o' them an' more'n manny, sor. I can handle six to tin loads a day, accordin' to the len'th o' the trip. I'll be afther havin' 'em shorter when the new docks be finished. I'm tryin' me best to git a free permit on account o' not havin' me solght. I k...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

FLANNELETTES. Beautiful, Servieeable, economical flannelettes. Absolutely no other material gives such general - winter satisfaction as doe, Flannelette. I Consider the manifold uses of this material. Consider the warmth and comfort of it, and the great diversity of effects procurable in it. Think of the strictly economical price of this material. As emphasised by our very Low Prices, We have a really fine lot of Flannelettes just in.. :i: It was imported direct from the mills, and so it is to be sold to you free of all middle ex .o .c:. _do i Fpenses _ Think of the savings you will therefore make. All the latest designs, effects and colors are . represented in our stock. You cannot do without Flannelette this Winter. There .is no other material that will do as well at the price, and our stock cannot be excelled, nor can the prices be less anywhere. For Blouses, ehildren's Underwear, Dressing Gowns, Jackets, Etc, Etc. And for a dozen and one other articles of apparel, you will find ...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sound Advice. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

Sound Advice. The Muddleton footballers were re turning home after having defeated their opponents, and. consequently sev eral of them had a surfeit of spirits. As the train drew up at a small sta tion one of the party who appeared to be more foolish even than the oth ers, and who was sucking a twofor-. a-penny cigar, popped his head out of the carriage window and address ed an elderly man who was leading a donkey. "'Ow'much'll yer take for the moke, guv'nor?" . The answer staggered the youth and convulsed those within hearing distance. "You've enough to do to keen younr self, lad, without buying another, so draw in your head, and mind your ears against the sides o' the win dow." Dead men tell no tales; which may explain why widows so often marry again. Says a daily paper advertisement: "Motor for sale; owner no further use.'" Why isn't he? He has either said too much or too little.

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A HORSELESS TOWN. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

A HORSELESS TOWN. At the doors of Indianapolis there is to be the first truly horseless city in America, and-save, perhaps, for those places where oxen,, goats, cam els,, or what not else furnish native and locomotive power-the first horse less'city of the world. The actual. construction work is well under way, .and in two .or three years there will be a complete town. The horse that tries to enter, says the "Motor," will be turned back as sternly. as motorists used to be from the strip on the Ocean Parkway in Brooklyn.' The man" with the motor car may enter free as air. It is planned to make this city, which is named Speedway, an. indus trial city.devoted to the interests of the motor-car trade.

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHARACTER IN YOUR THUMBS. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

CHARACTER IN YOUR THUMBS. Just as the chin gives qualities wL the face, so the thumb marks the personality of the hand, and is an unerring index to a man's natural strength or weakness of character. The man with a long, 'straight thumb, square at the tip, possesses good mental.-capacity, and can al ways be relied upon to carry out successfully any work with which he may be entrusted. His temperament is even and judicial; he is a born governor of men, overcomes difficul ties, carries himself.with dignity, and by his 'ability to concentrate all his faculties upon the matter in hand, combined with his tenacity of pur pose, rapidly becomes a power among his fellows. - If the thumbs be long, thick, and heavy at the tip, with the joints prom inent, a tyrannical and cruel nature is. indicated, everything being viewed from an intensely selfish standpoint. A short, straight thumb shows ob stinacy and driving power. If very .thick and heavy_at the.tip, a brutish, unreasoning disposition will ...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORDS OF WIT AND WISDOM. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

WORDS OF WIT.AND WISDOM: Be good, but also be good for some thing. It usually costs a man something to listen to flattery. Life is not all night and conflict; morning breaks at last. Know your man before you let hlis opinions weigh much. Singleness of,-purpose is not the same thing as strength of character. To be conscious that you are ig norant is a great step to knowledge. Preaching is out and away easier than practising, but not half so ef fectual. Everything that thou reprovest in another, thou must most " carefully avoid in fhyself.-Cicero. A committee is a thing which takes a week to do. what one good man can do in an hour. Many of the things which worry us most are trifles when we come to examine them closely. To have a respect for ourselves guides our morals and to have a de ference for others governs our man ners.-Sterne. Nine-tenths of the people who fail in life do so because they have never appreciated the. value of thorough ness. Only for the cheerful does the tree of l...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRISON MASTERPIECES. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

PRISON MASTERPIECES. Byron's famous poem, "The Prison er of Chillon," is supposed to be writ ten by Bonnivard, the Genevan pa triot, whilst he was incarcerated, in the Chateau. of Chillon, on the shores of the lake. But the poem was really written at lightning speed whilst Byron was imprisoned by inclement weather for a night and a day-in the neighborhood. Nevertheless, some notable literary achievements have been really writ ten in gaol, undoubtedly the most out standing being two of the world's greatest classics, "The Adventures of Don Quixote" and "The Pilgrim's Pro gress." If only those two books had belonged to the literature of captivity they would have been sufficient to make that literature distinguished and immortal. Thomas Cooper, the Chartist, whose life reads like a romance, and whose name is held in reverence by modern reformers, wrote a remarkable poem whilst he was lying in prison on ac count of his political agitation. .This poem bears the remarkable title of "The Pu...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHISTLES AT HIS WORK. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

WHISTLES AT HIS WORK. "My boy," said Uncle Hiram, "don't, for pity's sake, look glum, An' don't>'set tight your lips as if they speechless. were, an' dumb, When some hard task's before you, lor, though laboring like a Turk, The .happiest fellow's. he who sings or whistles at his work. A lesson :from the buzz-saw learn, that rings with honest glee, While into lumber it converts the trunk of stoutest tree, 'That hums a low-toned melody when easiest's its lot, An' always sings the loudest when it strikes the hardest knot. "To make of every task a joy you'll find's an art worth while; The hardest problems of the world• are sol-ed by those who smile. Abe Linc6dfl, when affairs of state perplexed him, deigned to chaff, Well knowing. fogs would lift before the sunshine of a laugh. He joked when those about him stood in woe and gloom profound;- Yet 'twas his laughter-wrinkled brow that fame undying crowned. He smiled, or, likely. chuckled, through each problem's softest spot, But shook w...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Leila and Her Lover. Published by Arrangement with Ward, Lock and Co. Ltd., London and Melb. III. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

Leila and er Lover_ . BY MAX pEMBERTON. Ahd b)rrangement with Ward, i?,'•ad Co. Ltd~ London and Melb. IIl. a -st dusk whenl they re u a -to st , so alt uistic had , ar- mother 'ies of delay. Lights t, heir otle pper winidows of frotm ale Footmen in the Senerabled p ith the measured b, elo, :' o have found an oc of: wain alter many days. •.goe' l lithat she might : had eggoecell during these re r -e"scibed carnival, but he cj3:r f"Phear of it. a hear ihat uch," lie said. 'ooe Se tlat so a oe m e from the tigers." mIs ae no anlswer, and they en e made hliall together. There era gts already arrived-aId crt euents which was ominous. 0t of seen Desdy since lunch, ',e aleased enough to hear his ad as lea wen p up the great stair cEt sehdeen ,?ing at tramways the a rcldeacon, and that vener wt ilourchar rose from the floor a ae which bore witness to the ':' k fe is oegradations. He ea?d re ro rPeasea to see Leila, and etEod i shlte was going up to ating tn ecs sarY finery having r ed hlier...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Quite Lively Enough. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 24 April 1914

Quite Lively Enough. Seated on an empty box in front of a log cabin -in the Far West was a man cleaning a double-barrelled gun. A passing tourist stopped to chat, and asked him how far it was to the nearest neighbor's. "A trifle over two miles," he re plied. "As far las :that? You must find it rather lonely here." ?"No, I can't say as I do. You see, I mortgaged this claim for four hun dred dollars. And I couldn't pay, so they foreclosed." The stranger murmured an exclam ation of surprise. "That was two years ago, and the sheriff has been trying to get posses sion ever since. He comes twice a week, and we have a shot at each other; and at least twice a week some idiot comes along and wants to know if I ain't lonely; and then there are thieving tramps and rattlesnakes; so this life is about as exciting as I like. There comes the sheriff now. You had better lie down behind that log, and keep-clear of his gun." The value' of quiet, comfort and shelter to farm animals is son mani fested ...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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