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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Beautiful Girls and Engineer [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Beautiful Girls   and Engineer   "Martin's Summer." Vicki Baum. Mar- tin Heil, a young engineer, takes a job   as swimming instructor at Frauensee in   the Austrian Tyrol, in order to make expenses. He finds himself among swarms of beautiful girls, and he him- self resembles a living Greek statue and   is "one of those men whom women don't give up to others." All sorts of com-   plications follow. This brilliantly writ-   ten book, by the famous authoress of "Grand Hotel," reverses the theme of   the lovely heroine, preserving her virtue against overwhelming odds, and shows us a handsome male trying to do like-   wise. (Geoffrey Bles.) "The Cook's Book." Juanita Cooper. British and foreign dishes. Recipes from all over the world. Make your meals international. (Angus and Robertson.)

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

PARTNERS IN HEALTH     —the Chemist and     the woman in the home!           The mother with the welfare of her family at             heart looks always to her Chemist for thoughtful,         reliable service. She knows that he is always       available in emergency, and that he is safe—       whereas untrained persons are neither.       I /VPw civî?^ SODA ^itw^ Ï*^h*^/S^»e?^ cv, J ?- ^CH CORRECTIVE lK^^y¿fa> J festive ^2mStr°n,aCh' «vTr' ^er M ^ r, ^6 JH Authorised by a Joint Committee of the Pharma-             ceutical Association of New South...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Junior Literary Society [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Junior Literary Society THE Junior Literary Society, Sydney, is a body of young people formed in 1926, with the object of assisting, by mutual criticism and by discussion among members, those who were interested actively or otherwise in journalism, literature and the drama. The society meets at its club room at 175 Pitt Street regularly each Tuesday evening. At these meetings manuscript journals are read and competitions and discussions are held. Prominent men of letters and well-known people of all walks of life address the society from time to time. The society has many good friends among the elder people of the literary world and a number of these assist by coming along to meetings and critici- sing and advising on the journals, etc. Mr. W. J. Cleary is patron of the society and has assisted members upon many occasions with his advice. There is a poetry and short story competition being conducted by the so- ciety at the present time, both of which close on September 30 next. Besi...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
DON'T Try to REMEMBER— [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

DONT Try to REMEMBER NO good business woman trusts a host of small details to her memory. She keeps a memo-book and jots them down as they come to the surface of her mind, crossing them off when done with. The mistress of a household often loads her brain with numerous small matters that are exceedingly diffi- cult to keep in mind till needed. A slate hung up in the kitchen, a memo pad in the bedroom, with an- other in the living room, would re- duce her mental work in a surpris- ing manner. It is not reason- able for a woman who has to attend to practically all the organisation of her household herself to expect her brain to bear in mind the shopping items to be ordered, letters to be written, birthday presents, etc. Get into the habit of jot- ting them down.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

TODAY'S UNRIVALLED QUALITY FOLLOWS 65 YEARS OF PROGRESS RESEARCH has proved that school children given extra milk food increase their height, their weight, and also their proficiency at school tasks. You can easily give your children this precious advantage by putting a few buttered MILK ARROWROOT BISCUITS in with each school lunch. The most convenient milk food for the school lunch is ARNOTT'S FAMOUS MILK ARROWROOT BISCUITS. Their wonderful building and sustaining quality more than offset the strain of school work and the vigorous energy of the playground. Made in Australia, financed by Australians, and produced by highly trained Australian workers. ARNOTT'S FAMOUS BISCUITS When buying mixed biscuits always ask for ARNOTT'S, and make sure you get them.  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Pat White Says [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Pat White Says     DON'T SLIDE FORWARD     on the toe with your front knee       bent, a style which was known     as "dipping," and went out of     fashion several years ago. Take       an easy natural step on to the       heel.  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Connie's Letter [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Connie's Letter My Dear Pals, Have any of you some nice, clear snaps of yourselves? If so, send them along to me for reproduction on this page. The Prize Letter for this week was written by Nellie Butler (15), "Messines," 13 Bona Vista Avenue, Maroubra, for which she receives a prize of 2/6. Nellie tells me in her interesting letter of all the different ways in which fish are caught around Tuggerah Lakes. After a lengthy description of the way in which the net is thrown out at night and left, Nellie goes on to say that: "The next morning the net has to be pulled in, and this is a very hard task, as there are thousands of fish (not to mention jelly blubbers) in the net, which naturally makes the uplifting of it very difficult. When the net is eventually pulled in, the fishermen throw the small fish away and load the launches with the larger fish and then transfer them to Wyong." Nellie must have watched the fishermen carefully to note all that she says in her letter. Pals, don't forg...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
A RAINY DAY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

A RAINY DAY   Prize of 5/. to Hazel Humphreys (13), Federal Brick Co., Alexandria.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Thc Imps show you how to do a balancing trick.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CROSSWORD No. 8 [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

CROSSWORD No. 8   ACROSS 1. Situation 4. Unfasten 7. Scents 9. I 11. Hotel 12. Same as 23 down 13. Depart 14. Life 15. Inquires 17. Offspring 19. Pronoun 20. Petroleum 22. Perform 23. Dress 25. Period 26. Not wealthy DOWN 2. Preposition 17. Fall 3. Prepare for public- 18. Entrance ation 21. Inside 4. Vessels 23. Baby's thanks 5. Nayy Service (int.) 24. Corporal's order 6. Oblong (int.) SOLUTION OF CROSSWORD, No. 6 Across: 1. Pigs. 4. Torn. 7. Otter. 9. No 11. Yon. 12. Ox. 13. Era. 15. Apt. 16. Ale. 17. Age. 18. Ate. 20. Ore. 22. Be. 23. Urn. 25. An. 26. Asked. 28. Ease. 29. Worm. Down: 1. Pine. 2. Go. 3. Sty. 4. Ten. 5. Or. 6. Next. 8. Top. 10. Orate. 12. Opera. 14 Ale. 15. Ago. 18. Able. 19. Ark. 21. Enam. 23. Use. 24. New. 26. As. 27. Do. The prize of 2/6 for the neatest, correct   solution goes to GEORGE HUGHES, 30 Moun- ter Street, Tighes Hill, Newcastle.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WHAT YOUR NAME MEANS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

WHAT YOUR NAME MEANS Girls called Betty are generally very good and religious. They are usually very particu- lar in carrying out orders. Boys with the name of Bruce are usually very strong in mind and body. They are reliable, and have cheerful dispositions. —THE ORACLE. Introducing little Patricia Kelly, of Chatswood. For painting the picture of the little elf, Prize Cards are awarded to Mavis Holland, 43 Hawson St., Aberdare, via Cessnock; Margaret   Huntington, 26 Langlee Avenue, Waverley; Deidre Shumork, P.O., Picton; Elsie Dicker, 39 Burlington Rd., Homebush; Doris Giles, Cur- rawong St., Young; Betty Bedson, 74 Stafford   St., Stanmore; Margaret Murphy, "Haverstock," Margaret St., Five Dock; Maurine Cahill, 4 Muttama Rd., Artarmon; Patricia Taylor, "Wensleydale," Port Hacking Rd., Port Hacking. Grandma (hearing a sneeze through the radio i : "Come away, children, that is how germs are spread." Prize card to B. Miller, 420 George Street, Brisbane.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FOR FUN AND FANCY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

FOR FUN AND FANCY   Why is an author more free than a mon- arch? Because he can choose his subjects. What is always behind time? The back of a watch. Prize Card to Helen Robertson, "Rostrevor," 28 The Parade, Enfield. What is the difference between a tree and an aeroplane? Ans.: One sheds its leaves, and the other leaves its shed. Prize Card to Joan Bartlett (13), 7 Neridah Street, Chatswood. Why is a dog's tail like the heart of a tree? Ans.: Because it is furthest from the bark. Prize Card to Jean Hines, Mutdapilly, via Harrisville, Q'land.  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The Fairy Songsters By Edna Corbett [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

The Fairy Songsters By Edna Corbett It was a warm summer night, and from my bed I was marvelling at the brilliance of the stars, when I heard sweet voices singing, far in the distance. Gradually they became louder, and I listened in wonder. Suddenly a host of fairies flew in through the window. The dainty little creatures danced and sang on my bed, and I was charmed by the sight. When they ceased singing, one of the fairies stepped for- ward, and asked me would I like to accom- pany her to Fairy- land. I told her that it was one of my great- est wishes. She then waved her wand over me, and in a twink- ling I was the same size as herself. Tak-         ing my hand, she flew out of the window, |Prize Card to Beryl followed by her sev- |Crompton (13), 265 eral companions. |Dora St., Hurstville. After flying for some time, we descended, and I next found myself standing in a forest, lighted with num- erous lanterns, each held by a quaint...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

NEXT WEEK: The hovering   cloud creeps slowly nearer, get-   ting ready to crash over poor   unconscious Lilian, now so   utterly absorbed in making her-   self into a good wife to Bill.    

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
TROPHIES Should be GUARDED [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

TROPHIES Should be GUARDED By RUTH PREDDEY To everyone who had the privilege o acquaintanceship with the late Daphne Akhurst, a deep value attaches to the memorial trophy recently presented to thc N.S.W. Lawn Tennis Association. In view of the unrehearsed incidents in the history of trophies, tennis players as a whole would feel happier were an inviolable condition made that visiting players winning the trophy should not be allowed to remove it. TO do so would not be to establish a precedent, for this condition al- ready obtains with more than one over- seas trophy. When Jack Crawford returns to Aus- tralia he will not bring with him the cup which nominally becomes his property for the twelve months follow- ing his win in the singles championship at Wimbledon. Last year Joan Hartigan won the New Zealand women's singles title, but was not able to bring the trophy back with her. The value of these trophies dictates this condition in order to preclude any possibility of their going ast...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
COUNTRY CHAMPION Learnt from a BOOK [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

COUNTRY CHAMPION Learnt from a BOOK By DOROTHY KEARNEY APPROACHING the "nineteenth" at the Royal Sydney. Mesdames Robert- son, Reid, Reg. Benington, Whitton, and Misses Joan Hood-Hammond and Odette Lefebvre. An outstanding personality at   the recent State championship   meeting was the tall, slender left-   hander, Miss Vedas Ebert, who   hails from Griffith. Though only   twenty-four, she has reached the   realm for which all golfers strive,   that of championship class. On   her own confession she has won   her laurels without the aid of the   golfer's standby, a lesson from a   professional.   MISS EBERT holds the proud title of associate country champion of New South Wales, and, with Miss Sydney Jones, that of the State foursomes. She has unquestionably acquitted herself with distinction in big golf. When one considers her a...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Trophy Not For Women [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Trophy Not For Women "Unsportsmanlike" is a word that has created a certain amount of bitterness lately, but the English women have every reason to apply the word to the attitude taken by the National Rifle Association, who are endeavoring to oust women from the rifle ranges. SEEMINGLY it is not in accordance with rifle shooting for a woman to win. In 1930 Miss Foster won the King's Prize. Immediately Surrey, the county from which she hails, passed a rule that no woman should be allowed to win the Challenge Cup in future. She may enter, and win, but the Cup must go to a man even if he be second or further down the list. There are no restrictions on women competing and winning any prize here in Australia. The same rules apply to either sex. The Liverpool Rifle Asso- ciation conducts the largest "shoot" in the Empire with the exception of the Bisley.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LIVE Wire SPORTS SECTION [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

LIVE Wire SPORTS SECTION THE sports group attached to the staff of Anthony Hordern and Sons Ltd. is essentially progressive. Just at present the most jubilant section of the group is the hockey girls, for their cap- tain and coach has been selected to play with the New South Wales team in Adelaide. Two teams play in the hockey group, which is only a small offshoot of the great social and welfare department which Miss Halimburg supervises. Over 1600 employees partake in some sort of activity which the firm provides for their enjoyment. There is a large concert hall on the top floor of the store, where the dramatic and musical societies give their performances. When the physical culture classes com- menced over 200 girls were present. Dancing is another form of amusement for the girls. And there is no excuse for the girls not to be domesticated, for there are also cooking classes for them to attend. For the outside activities the firm purchased 13 acres of land at Dulwich Hill, and th...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 29 July 1933

Tennis Players! Awake! Here's the Greatest Racket Coup so far this year! Slazengers' Superb "ROYAL ENSIGN" 1933 Model "B" Au Absolutely Genuine 55/- Value Racket with quality Press and Cover for. . . . 35/-(Post Paid) Tennis Players! Take our word for it, this is definitely racket value unparalleled in all Australia to-day. Have you seen this new "Royal Ensign" Model B? It's right in the front line of the 1933 rackets . . . a quality job . . . every inch of it. And remember, it's yours, with a press and cover, for 35/-. It has the new type Sycamore Overlayed Frame, a streamline throat, and is of superlative Slazenger manu- facture and finish. Color scheme, orange, black and white, with gold line relief. Fitted with leather grip. To see this beautiful racket is to buy one. When mak- ing your pur- chase men- tion Womens Weekly. All letters to Box 18B, P.O., Haymarket, Sydney. MICK SIMMONS Ltd. 720-2 GEORGE STREET, HAYMARKET, SYDNEY, "The Premier Sports House of Australia,"

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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