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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Winter with the Canadians. SOME NOVEL AMUSEMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

Winter with the Canadians. SOME NOVEL AMUSEMENTS. It is refreshingly cool in these days of hot sun and warm winds to contemplate, even on paper, the winter pastimes of our Canadian cousins. "An interesting winter pastime," says the "Sketch," is that of ice-castle building. These creations of ice are not run up in a hurry, as many suppose, but occupy the services of quite an army of men from six to eight weeks before they are finished. The ice is cut from the river with saws into rectangular blocks   and carted to the scene of operation on sledges. The palaces are built under the superintendence of an architect, who is re- sponsible for their sta- bility. Block after block of translucent ice is swung into position by cranes, until the building is completed. During the day, the castles or palaces shine in the winter sunlight like glittering crystal, while at night they are illumi- nated with strong electric arc-lamps, giving the structures the appearance of some enchanted...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NINE NEW MEN-OF-WAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

NINE NEW MEN- OF-WAR.   The Admiralty have is- sued specifications to private shipbuilders invi- ting tenders for two bat- tleships, five first-class cruisers, and two third class cruisers. The speci- fications are accompanied by a request that the tenders for the battle- ships be pushed forward with all haste, as the Admiralty is desirous that the work be speed- ily gone on with. As a consequence Clyde draughtsmen have been called upon to break their New Year holiday. The battleships will have the high displace- ment of 16,500 tons and a length of 420ft. They will be the most power- fully armed in the Brit- ish navy, and their ar- mor will be heavier and more widely distributed than on any warship afloat. On the waterline the armor will be 9in. thick and abreast of the main deck 8in., or 2in. more than that of the last battleships built. They will carry four 12in. guns in barbettes with heavy hoods practically covering them; four 9in.   on turrets, and 10 ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Discovery and Invention. CURATIVE EFFECT OF ELECTRICITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

Discovery and Invention. CURATIVE EFFECT OF ELECTRICITY. —♦— From time to time reports, not too well authenticated, appear of some marvellous cura- tive effect of electricity; and it is to be feared that the public, always credulous of electrical marvels, must in some instances be cruelly dis- appointed. It was said, on apparently good authority, some time ago, that the effects of lead-poisoning might be diminished, if not alto- gether cured, by electric baths; but the dis- tinguished medical man who was experimenting in this direction had the candor to admit that he had been mistaken in the extent of the cura- tive effect of this remedy. Other medical men are not so candid, and are sometimes a great deal more rash in their proclaimed remedies. It is a fact, however, that for some time past St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, has had a very complete installation of electro-therapeutical ap- paratus, though the public has heard very little of the experiments made with it. It is good ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
VALUABLE DISCOVERIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

VALUABLE DISCOVERIES. Last spring some Italian archaeologists dis- covered the ruins of a great palace on the site of the Phaestus, in the south of Crete. Since the departure of these gentlemen the peasants have been excavating, and have found a series of rock tombs in the neighborhood of the palace. The tombs are of the dome and chamber type, and they contain several skeletons richly adorned with jewellery, such as necklaces and rirgs, having gems engraved with representa- tions of demons. Considering that tombs are the only places where these valuable objects are to be found, the importance of this discovery is great.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MEASURING DISTANCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

MEASURING DISTANCE, Colonel Quinemant, of the French Army, is the inventor of a new device for measuring dis-   tances. It is a pocket telemeter, weighs only 30   grams, and resembles a book. The instrument   is composed of three mirrors, protected by cop- per covers, and the principle applied is double reflection. The mirrors are so arranged that they can be fixed by a spring at given angles, which enable the user to resolve an isosceles   triangle. The application of mathematical rules gives the length of one of the sides of the tri- angle, or, in other worde, the distance sought.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW PAVING STONES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

NEW PAVING STONES. —♦— A street near the Madeleine, in Paris, has been laid with vitreous paving stones, made of pow- dered glass compressed by hydraulic machines and cut in cubes. A year ago this kind of pave- ment was put down near the St. Lazare Station, where the chief objection to it was that it was very slippery. The inventors have now dis- covered a process whereby the surface can be made to give a grip to horses' hoofs.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW TARGETS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

NEW TARGETS.   —♦—   The new rifle ranges which have been started   in different parts of the country have been pro-   ductive of a new set of regulations, similar to   that which has been in force of late at Aldershot.   The object is to render the conditions under   which rifle shooting is practised as closely   similar as possible to those of war. Whereas,   therefore, the exact distance of the target has   hitherto been communicated to the soldier, in   future as great use as possible will be made of   small head and shoulder targets, which can be   moved backwards and forwards at the discretion   of the officer to the distance of about 100 yards.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STRAW SHOES FOR HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

STRAW SHOES FOR HORSES. The praiseworthy fashion of providing horses with straw hats as a guard against the sun is common, but it is doubtful if the Japanese idea of horseshoes will ever be generally adopted, though it may have much to recommend it. In that country straw instead of iron is employed for the purpose. The shoes are made of ordinary rice straw, braided very tight and firm, making a surface the size of the horse'e hoofs, and about half an inch thick. They cost about a halfpenny a pair.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GENERATING ELECTRIC POWER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

GENERATING ELECTRIC POWER. Stellenbosch is a township which, during the course of the South African war, has added a rather ominous verb to the English tongue; but it possesses in Victoria College an institution of considerable activity, and its Professor of Physics, Professor G. T. Morrison, has recently delivered at Capetown a lecture on the utilisa- tion of the Orange River for power-generating purposes. In the falls of the Orange River, South Africa possesses the source of far more than sufficient convertible energy for working the whole of the Cape Government railways. The falls are 400 miles away from Capetown,     and 500 miles from East London, and the chief     question in their utilisation is that of trans-     mitting the electric power generated at them     over such long distances. Taking the power     used on all the Government railways as a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW AND NOVEL FAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A NEW AND NOVEL FAN.   —♦— A theatrical critic mentions that he has en- countered a new sort of fan. He sat next a lady at the theatre the other night who from time to time produced a kind of miniature windmill which she held up to her face. It was rather disturbing. The little machine was noiseless, and looked like an ordinary fan. It appears that the tortoiseshell stem is hollow: you press a little steel rod rapidly and the air propelled up wards makes a little metal sail at the top revolve. The principle is the same as that of the ventilators in restaurants.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BIG PAPER MACHINE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A BIG PAPER MACHINE. When a Lancashire paper-mill put in a 145in.   machine it was looked upon as wonderful. The   Americans began by sneering at big machines as   cumbersome and useless, but quickly broke the   record at 152in., then at 158in., and then at 162in.   Now they are dissatisfied with this, and a   machine is in hand that will require a wire 165in.   wide, and will furnish 156in. of trimmed paper.   This machine will hold the record for a time,   and for a short time only, for there are people   who have in mind the construction of a 172in.   machine. The 165in. machine will have only   two speeds, 400ft. and 500ft., and it is expected   that it will produce 40 tons of newspaper a   day.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE POOR MAN'S BEER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THE POOR MAN'S BEER. —♦— The inventor is prepared for every emergency.     He has already recognised that the Child Mes-     senger Act opens a new field for his ingenuity,     and has suggested devices without end to enable     the poor man to get his beer. The "Daily Mail"     describes some of these. One of the most in-     genious of the new inventions to meet the Act is     a round tin very much like a Swiss milk tin in     shape, but large enough to hold a reputed pint,     as required by the new law. The top is fixed     down by pressing it into the rim, its bevelled edge getting tighter the more it is pressed. At the side are two rails of wire, one is attached to the lid, and the other to the body of the tin. When the l...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOR CARRIERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

FOR CARRIERS. The French military authorities have devised a metal carrying case in which carrier pigeons can be transported without injury to themselves. The covers are made of any metal, preferably alu- minium, and are shaped to fit the pigeons. They are so constructed that the bird can be fed, without letting it loose, and when the head piece of the metal covering is opened the pigeon can eat or drink, but cannot get away from its prison. It is urged that cavalry men can carry these cases on their saddles while reconnoitring, and set the birds free at any time they want to des- patch an important message to camp. The value of the carrier pigeon is so well known that it seems quite likely that the scheme is one that will be adopted by various armies.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW DOMINOES ORIGINATED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

HOW DOMINOES ORIGINATED. Two monks who had been committed to a lengthy seclusion, beguiled the dreary hours of their confinement by showing each other small flat stones marked with black dots. By a pre- concerted arrangement the winner would inform the other player of his victory by repeating in an undertone the first line of the vespers prayer. In process of time the two monks managed to complete the set of stones and to perfect the rules of the game, so that when the term of in- carceration had expired the game was so in- teresting that it was generally adopted by all the inmates of the monastery as a lawful pas- time. It soon spread from town to town, and became popular throughout Italy; and the first line of vespers was reduced to the single word "Domino," by which name the game has ever since been known.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NATURE AND INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

NATURE AND INVENTIONS. —♦— Nature has foreshadowed almost all of man's inventions. The hypodermic syringe with which the physician injects morphine into a patient's arm has its counterpart in the sting of a bee. The tunnel-borer is an adaptation of the work of teredo, or ship worm. The principle of the balloon is found in certain fishes. The paper- making industry is paralleled in the building of a wasp's nest. In the mechanism of a man's body there are joints and levers similar to those used in engines. The automatic oiling of sur- faces which rub together in an engine is on the same plan as the lubrication of joints in our same plan as the lubrication of joints in our bodies. Man's nervous system resembles the telegraph in its mode of work- ing. The ball bearings of a bicycle or joints of human hips and shoulders. The prin- ciple of the lever was foreshadowed in the long bones of the human body.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SOFT ANSWER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A SOFT ANSWER.   A witty as well as a soft answer will sometimes turn away wrath. Charles Burleigh, the aboli- tionist, in the midst of an anti-slavery speech, was struck by a rotten egg full in the face. Pausing to wipe away the contents of the mis- sile, he said calmly, "I have always contended that pro-slavery arguments were very unsound." The crowd roared, and he was no longer mo-   lested.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
U.S. Pensioners. AN ARMY OF A MILLION TO SUPPORT FOR THEIR VOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

U.S. Pensioners. AN ARMY OF A MILLION TO SUPPORT FOR THEIR VOTES. The intervention of the United States in world politics, its war in the Philippines, and the other conflicts which its expansionist policy will produce will enormously swell the present huge army of pensioners. To judge from its pension roll one would think that the United States had been having perpetual warfare for a hundred years. The last report of the Commis- sioner shows that there are over a million on the pension roll, involving an annual expendi- ture of 138,531,483 dollars, or £27,706,296. This sum is almost the same as the normal annual cost of the British army. It is more than the cost of the German army and navy, seven mil- lions more than the total expenditure of Japan; a third more than the total expenditure of the Turkish Empire, equal to the whole expenditure of Spain, and only two million less than the whole cost of the British navy. A STEADY INCREASE. The two most striking things about the pen- sion...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
UNAVOIDABLE DELAY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

  UNAVOIDABLE DELAY.   "What made you so late?"   "I came up in my automobile, and passed here   three times before I could manage to stop."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OWLISH OBSERVATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

OWLISH OBSERVATIONS.   Any fool can find fault; most fools do.   It is easier to buy the good opinion of the world   than to merit it.   Appreciation is not always shown in a manner   in which it is appreciated.   Empty barrels make the most noise; after them   come those who have emptied them.   Every man has in him the capacity for running   some business—usually some other man's busi- ness.   Every man who shows that he thinks as highly   of himself as we do of ourselves we set down as   conceited.   "Smart Set."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUFFOCATED BY GOLD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

SUFFOCATED BY GOLD.   A gold-refiner, Joseph Micoulas by name, 28 years old, was at work in a laboratory in the Hue de Charenton recently when he was seized with an epileptic fit. His head fell forward into a basin of gold dust, which penetrated his nostrils and eventu- ally suffocated him. This is the first death of the kind ever recorded in Paris.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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