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Elephind.com contains 66,464 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

JUST ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO HOW WE CINCHED FREEDOM AND NAPOLEON WANED The year 1812 saw the establishment for all time of American independence; and the ebbing of Napoleon Bonaparte's reign over Europe. ' For many months before 1812 England, then at war with the first Napoleon, had searched American vessels for deserters from the British navy. Many of the sailors taken had become naturalized citizens of the United States, but Great Britain had VSEfSV can vessels were carrying goodsto his enemies. Between the two, France and England, America was getting the worst of it. She couldn't fight both, so she picked England. England was altogether too domineering in her treatment of Americans. Early in the year 1812 James Madison, then president, sent 3 message to congress advising war. Henry Clay was speaker of the house; one of the rising mem- enunciated the doctrine that "once a British subject, always a British subject." Not only did they continue removing their deserters from our vessels...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

Almost immediately American vessels sailed out hunting for British ships. They found -some 300 the first year : 300 British vessels surrendered to the American flag, for the sailors on the American ships were the best sailors and the best fighters in the world. The war gave us two later presidents, William Henry Harrison and Andrew Jackson. After peace was declared a new and greater power had arisen in the world of nations the United States of America. The climax of Napoleon Bonaparte's career was reached in 1812. Master of western Europe, Great Britain alone excepted, Napoleon hurled a half million of his best warriors onto Russia. Through Northern . Germany they marched, Russian resistance faded before them. The month that saw the beginning of the Anglo-American war saw Napoleon enter Russia. The Russian army, terrified at the approach of the French retired from Moscow, followed by most of the inhabitants. Napoleon entered the deserted city with flags flying and gay music, establi...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

'? j w( lQia !W4oiv$&leif Well, it's the New Year make it a true year, Ever a happy and never a blue year. You can't do much? But you CAN do your share, You can be gentle and kindly and fair, You can forget all your rancor and hate, You can cut out all your grouch against fate; Let's have a gay year not a dull gray year Make it a regular hip-hip-hooray year! liere's to a glad year, never a sad year, Get in and help so it wont be a bad year, Make it your business to smile not to frown, Reach out your hand to the fellow who's down ; Work hard, ofvcourse, but keep this in your ken, Ours is a world not of money but Men ! That means a bright year, a laughing and light year Yes, and an-honest and noble and right year. Here's to a fair year make it a square year, Boost for a rich and royal and rare year! Play the game hard, but abide by the rules, Leave all the cheating to swindlers and fools, Here is your place, brother, come and take hold Pick up the new burden, throw off the...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS By George B. Govier The New Year dawns, and in its wake, fair resolutions follow;, such simple fragile things to make, with wings of summer's swallow. A man, a maid, remorse profound, repentance, absolution as surely as the dav swings round, revives each resolution. She '0, dear, this New Year's day, I know, finds me a dreadful sinner. I keep folks waiting for me so, I'm always late for dinner; , i henceforth I'll always be on time. For 'dopes,' frappes, and candy, I shall not spend another dime now that 'resolve' is dandj'! I'm going to quit this awful slang, and bridge, too, I'll forswear; I'll leave that club without a pang they gossip too much there. I'll try to put my temper down, wont talk about my neighbors; and for all this- perfection's crown shall soon reward my labors !' He ' s "I'll climb upon the water cart, today will be the starter; and cigarettes affect the heart By Jove, I'll be a martyr, forswearing every dearest vice; but 'tis the time to do...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

Hi,);;!;::: LET US RESOLVE To stick for the big show. Not to repeat the baby's sayings. To confine our gossip to people's good points. To keep our virtues off the band wagon. To rest between drinks. To tell the truth only when it is helpful. To kick no dog. To hurt no child. To sneer at no man. To reverence all women. To tickle all vanities but our own. To laugh whenever there is a chance. To share all our joys. To keep our sortows to ourself. To carry no chip on our shoulders. To love our neighbors and still leave them alone. To divide our pumpkin pies. ' To give no neckties for Christmas. To work as hard as we rest. To rest as hard as we work. To remember the honey, not the sting. To see the rainbow, not the storm. To keep the rose and not the thorn. To worship as we work. To dream while we dig. To live in the sunshine. To fill the soul as well as the pocket. To keep an open heart for alJU wanderers. To cling to eternal things. .To love man and trust God. o o THE 1812 PRESS AGENT ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

w PLAYERS WHO ICK "BRICK" OWENS AS EASY ARE UP AGAINST REAL CASE HARDENED INDIVIDUAL M 90? NEW YEARS When word came that Umpire Hank O'Day had signed to manage the Cincinnati team, many a National leaguer laughed and enjoyed the sensation. It was the first laugh the old leaguers had turned on Hank in the memory of the oldest player. The pleasure may be all the players' until next season opens and finds O'Day shoes pre-empted by "Brick" Owens. This Owens person is some umpire. In the American association he is looked upon as the best little "bet that ever made a rowdy player walk turkey. Owens has had a temptuous careen. In the American association his work was high class and he was absolute boss of the field when the game was in progress. Clarence ("Brick") Owens Umpire baiters always came off second best. Four years ago Owens got into serious trouble at Minneapolis by making a decision against the home club, in favor of Columbus a play that had serious bearing upon the pennant race...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

ESW $525 a month took Owens back to the American association. He signed a three years' contract. Last fall the contract expired and he accepted President Lynch's offer in the National, in preference to working for Ban Johnson, who is after him. Owens went to the American association from the Western league six years ago. Blessed with a fine physique and a shock of hair from which he derived his nickname "Brick," it is a nervy player who will do more than mildly dispute his ruling, or think of rubbing his fur the wrong way. In addition to his physical adVantages, Owens is a wit, as players who have tried to best him in repartee will testify. Like Tim Hurst and Tommy Connolly, he is nimble of wit and sharp of tongue, while his voice, when making decisions, is of the fog horn variety that carries to the bleachers. And his real name is Clarence. o o RESOLUTIONS . JHK ,-1 - MP x g Joe Cannon Not to seek the presidency. o o The New Year will be much like the Old Year for the baseball umpi...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

ADOLF GETS HIS FIRST GOOD CHANCE Yes. i m&am ir. 8Y D6R V4V l HF c?oor News TOR YOU l M ?0N3 TO SVC4R OfF ASOoaNff v-in 1 MAP EECW TOO CFERBeoJN? CNTRFLY. ( 7 VNX NO MYTBR. J-: J VOT 1S DER 7 Provccton i "55SV PLEDGE MYsecF NEFER sr' TO RAISB MY NNT SS. f$toHX MY ?OOT ffl. Ff?ENT OLF.' p iiillflflHaiiiiiiMiiin TO "PROOF ZO J CJO Rj?T MfliX -BY A NOTARY ' UNO 5VER TO O. r DGRC, XT ORSGAl. CSS OFCJR UND 1 FeeL a& peace mit 6R woRcr. jTT Pt s 62?ZaS2s s JP

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

MlwfcMi--., ii r - ''.-. j ':.' ; - rr i iba 5FANT TbR ? j- ' Pn I DO fCW ( - " lk ' TJi 'I ' ' I ' I I II ! ' ' IN THE LIMELIGHT Here's a leap-year hint girls aim high while you're a"bout it. For instance, Col. 'Eddie" Green, only son of Mrs. Hetty Green, America's richest woman, is 42, and a bachelor. Up to date he has received only 6,242 palpitating love missives from Women, young and otherwise, who are willing to trot in double harness with him. If he ca,n do that well in "off" years how heavy will be the loads the mail carrier will tote to the colonel's office in this gladsome leap year? The colonel isn't hard to please. He says so himself. "I'll marry," he intimates, "any girl as long as she is the most beautiful in the world and suits me exactly on the matter of disposition." "Eddie" is a jolly cuss, all right, all right. RESOLUTIONS JXTtf Santa Claus To do my Christ mas shopping early. If you'll just say "God helping me, I will be kind," you needn't make any other resolution...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

MR. PORCUPINE TELLS HIS STORY Mr. Noah Brings Him Out of the Ark for the Entertainment of Day Book Boys and Girls. Did you ever hear any one say "as sharp as a porcupine quill?" My body is covered with sharp quills that I use when any one tries to catch me. Then I raise all my quills, run backwards and stick them into my enemy. It is not much fun to get into a fight with a porcupine, I can tell you. When I walk, the quills in my tail rattle together and make a rustling sound. They are used by the Indians for decorating their .noccasins and suits. I am a lonely little fellow. I live all by myself in a burrow in the ground. I come out only at night, when I seek my food. I eat roots, berries, leaves and vegetables. I gnaw my food with two sharp teeth in my upper jaw. I like to climb trees. I am brownand about two feet long. Around my neck and the back of my head is a crest of long bristles. I have a grunting voice like that of a pig. I must hide in my burrow now. Goodbye, goodbye. L-. ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

il n CYNTHIA GREY SAYS "MAN LOVES WHAT IS LOVABLE AND HATES WHAT IS UNLOVELY" 'Am a young married man ; have been married a year, and have discovered that my wife has a very bad temper. When she wants something new, and I cannot afford to get it for her, she gets angry and tears up the worn article which she wants me to replace. Do you think it is right for rrr to do this? And what would you advise? A Friend. It is childish, and the girl ought to be sent back to her parents to be trained in self-control and common sense. However, as there is no such legal process, the un fortunate husband will have to cultivate a supreme indifference to hysteria, moods and tempers of this kind. But indifference is not love, and in another year or so the young wife will have some real trouble to scream about. Point out to her the truth, that man loves what is lovable and hates what is unlovely, and that her conduct is killing your affection. It will probably do little good, for women thus "temperamen...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

wmmmmmmmmmmam W It is a tradition among women that they can do no wrong because they have no vices they do not smoke nor drink. But this smug virtue causes as much wretchedness in some homes as man's drunkenness or brutality does in others. There is no use whatever in trying to train a woman of fifty years into new ways. The husband might go on strike, with the -o- possible chance that the wife would be frightened into behaving. But the probabilities are that in a week he would be meekly enduring the same old round of domestic torture. Neither of these letters can be answered satisfactorily, but they may serve to warn some women that husbands are not necessarily blind because they happen to be devoted and obedient! FOUR WAYS FOR WOMEN TO PROPOSE Samantha lived on a farm for years an' yearned fer a man with sighs and tears. Then finally leap year came along an' Samantha said: "I've waited long; there ain't goin' to be no more delay, I'll get myself a fyansay." When the time arrived f...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

THE DIPPER HELPS A FRIEND, AND ENCOUNTERS AN ATHLETIC YOUNG WOMAN LACKING IN MERCYfj I came on The Dipper in the rear of a little salon on the South Side. He was plunged in gloom, but at sight? of me he cheered up visably. "Mine'll be whisky," he said promptly. "Straight whisky, an' lots of it." I pressed the button because there happened to be something I particularly wished The Dipper to do for me. "Dipper," I said, about the time that gentleman was wiping his mouth with the sleeve of his coat, "I want you to do me a little favor." The Dipper suddenly became galvanized into life. "Nix!" he said vehemently. "Ab-so-lute-ly nix! This isn't my day of' the week for doing favors." I was grieved. I had supplied The Dipper with cigarettes when he was in jail. I had bought him countless drinks. He even had used my home as a refuge from the police. I felt that I was not being treated right. "Do you mean to say you are going to refuse?" I demanded. "I do," said The Dipper with intense convic...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

wmmmmmmmmmmmmm "So he e-volves the following original little idea: "He has a date with the dame the next night. He's to be there at 9 o'clock, an' he intends to stayas long as the law an' papa allow. "About 10 o'clock, I am to sneak up to the house, and enter the lady's boudoir with malice aforethought an' felonious intent, by a window that's always open, "I am to scoop up a handful of the lady's jewelry, an' then tomake a noise, which is to give my friend the office, that it's his turn. "Therr he rushes into the bedroom, cops me after a desperate struggle, and does the hero act over my body, as it were. "There were points about this little evolution that didn't appeal to me from the first. " 'How about the finale?' I asks him. 'You duty'll be to hand me over to the bulls, an' that'll mean about seven years for little Willie " 'But you forget that I have a soft heart,' says he. 'You don't even know how soft my heart is. After I've got you down on the floor with my manly knees plante...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

looks o' things, an' then I banged up against the bed, makin' enough noise to bring the house down. "A door in the side o' the room that I hadn't noticed before opens, an' in stalks a lady I take to be Amanda IN her nightie AN' totally lacking the support of my hero-friend. " 'What are you doing in here?' she demands. "I grinned kinda foolish, I remember, an' muttered something about the water havin' looked fine, an' then I recalled what Bennett had said about me actin' particularly ferocious until he got his hooks on me. N "So I drew my gat, and my best, Sunday-go-to-meetin' scowl. " Tut up your hands or I'll drill a hole in your kimona.' " 'I wont,' says she, an' turns the key in the door, and gets between me and the window. " 'The- other door is also locked,' she says, 'you can't get out that way.' " Stop foolin,' says I, 'an' get those hands up, or I'll put a hole through you as sure as your name's Amanda.' " 'How do you know my name's Amanda?' says she. "I saw what I'd been an'...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

I was ill in bed an' couldn't see him tonight. "I never did so much sweatin' in all my life as I did when she got that out of her system, an' Amanda she just sat there, smilin' to herself, but keepin' the gat in a direct line with my head. " 'You better tell me all about it,' she says at last. "I did. There didn't seem to be anything else to do, although I saw at the time that me an' Bennet weren't goin' to be friends any longer. "At the end of the pretty little story, she sat there smilin' an' thinkin' to herself for a while, an' then turns an' looks at me as if I was a new kind of bug that had blown in when the window was open. " 'Now 1 wonder what I'm going to do with you?' she says. " 'If you'll allow me to suggest ' says I. " 'But I won't;' says she. 'You came here to take advantage of a poor defenceless woman, and now you are going to pay for it.' "Then she reaches out an' touches a bell. ".You ain't going to call the bulls, are you?' says I, the inside of me feelin' as if it ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

W&Stf&v5&& 5S53e? JUST ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO HOW OUR ANCESTORS DRESSED, TRAVELED The short waist was iusr p-ninp nut nf Su fashion in 1812; skirts were almost as skimpy as today s. 1 he ultra fashionable wore them of very soft, sheer, clinging material. These gowns were the subject of many a satire, a historian tells us. Fur muffs of a size even as they are now were liked so well- that many women carried them in summer. Pictures of women in muslin dresses, straw hats and fur muffs are preserved to us. The stylish man wore tightly fitting trousers and went in for considerable color, vieing with the rainbow in that respect. Sideburns pointed toward an approaching bearded age. When he traveled he rode on top of a . coach. There were no "railroads for din ing cars to run over, hence the traveler alighted at taverns along the highway for his food. Boats plied between New York and Philadelphia upon which! passengers "ran down" to either city...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm to the monumental figure of a dollar a" day. Labor organizations were merely benevolent societies, and the thought of striking for higher wages had just taken root. The only occupation that paid big money was slave smuggling, which, despite all the laws, was carped on with little molestation. The first steamboat went down the Ohio from Pittsburg. Prior to that they built boats in Pittsburg, floated them down to New Orleans, or to Nashville, and there abandoned them. That gave the boat building in Pittsburg a never ending stream of customers. The Methodist Episcopal conference voted down a resolution prohibiting their preachers from selling whisky and 'beer. The first American missionaries were sent to foreign lands, going to Asia. The army canteen was introduced, "a gill ,of rum, whisky or brandy is made a part of the regular daily rations of each soldier." Travelers did not send picture postals to the folks back home, postal cards not having been invented. There...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

I WILL 300N .3V ym) vt CMOUSM TO WVT 7W 7y P c . 3x3PTf&. 5 On the Road to Riches WILL YOU ELOPE, FRED? M. SvvT C J 6 The Tryst 7 As the Clock Strikes 12 8 The Getaway 9 The Race for the Taxi ""- ' . . 10 Mamma in Pursuit Q&d(GOOOBY r 11 At the Depot Too Late! Hooray Z-, 12Papa Consoles Mamma To 1912. Ho, little stranger! Step right in Here's a joy for you to dance, A toy for you to spin. Drop your baggage on the floor Pull up by the fire, I've a cosy room for you In my Heart's Desire! This is the one day of the year when the water wagon can charge what it pleases and sell all its standing room. Tomorrow the accidents begin.

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 1 January 1912

wmmmmmmmmmmmmmm ( I y FIVE MILLION DOLLAR GIRL MAKES HER DEBUT IN WASHINGTON SOCIETY Miss Margaret Draper, who inherited $5,000,000 from her father, Gen. William F. Draper and whose coming out party, Dec. 27, was a leading feature of the Washington social season. A story that live humming birds and butterflies from southern climes were to be features of the function was denied by Miss Draper. The real affair was a fancy dress ball attended by many prominent society girls of the capitol city. o o As the New Year comes prancing in jubilantly we trust his spirits will not be crushed by the spectacle of the woolen trust singing "There's no times like the old times." -Instead of making new resplu- tions, let us try and keep some of the old ones. The average resolution, smells strongly of moth balls. Still the Old bad, was he? Year wasn't so mmmtmmAmmtmmmm

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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