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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 325 It is regrettable that there are so few popular works of his tory or fiction that do justice to the Indian character. School children and legislators alike are ignorant of what the Indian was and what he is. They do not know that our guardianship has been so ill that most Indians feel a half-buried resentment and distrust us yet, and they scarcely understand the barriers our insults or indifference and the Indian's wounded sensibili ties have reared between us. Students of the Indian question know that the early Indians were not bloodthirsty savages. There can be no denying that the Indians suffered great wrongs at the hands of the first settlers, nor can his friends deny that to drive away the hated stranger he fought bitterly. True, his warfare partook of the character of the winding forest paths he lived among; but the Indian went out to kill, not to be killed, and who can blame him that, instead of rushing val orously but stupidly to death in an exposed ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

326 The Indian Advocate. Father De Smet and the Montana Indians, 1 nn ATHOLIC Iroquois had taught the Flathead In- M dians the first rudiments of the Christian religion ana arousea in cnem an intense uesut: lu uave some black-robes in their midst to lead them on in the knowledge and service of the Great Spirit. From 1831 to 1839 four expeditions went forth from Bitter Root Valley to St. Louis, Mo., to se cure the men of prayer. In 1839 their request was granted. Father De Smet, Jesuit priest, born in Belgium in 1801, of profoundly religious and wealthy parents, presented his services to his Superior. The Superior felt embarrassed. He found it hard to refuse the two-fold request of the Indians and Father De Smet, nor had he the means to grant their earnest petition. With one sen tence the great-hearted missionary brushed aside the appa rently insurmountable obstacle: "If you cannot afford to send two of us, let me go alone. I'll get means from my home and friends in Europe." His wish...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 327 deputed our people to the great black-robe in St. Louis to ob tain priests. Now, Father, speak and we will comply with all that you will tell us; show us the way we have to take to go to the home of the Great Spirit." Father De Smet's missionary labors began with the day of his arrival. He was wont to give three, four, five instructions daily. Within two months he had prepared several hundred of his Indians for baptism and instructed about a thousand others. On the 27th of August he left the Flathead tribe with the promise to come back to them in the spring with other black-robes. Whilst on their return to St. Louis he and his escort were surrounded by a war party of Blackfeet. The meeting of the representatives of these two hostile tribes would have meant a bloody fight under ordinary circumstances; but the chief of the Blackfeet was struck by the cassock and glit tering crucifix of the man of peace. "Who are you?" he asked. "He is the black-robe," said one...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

328 The Indian Advocate. i mission, St. Mary's, in the Bitter Root valley. On the day of their arrival a huge cross was eredled to commemorate the event. On the first Sunday of Odlober the mission was for mally inaugurated. A log chapel and residence were built within a few weeks' time, and before the end of October the missionaries could record that one single day had brought to their instructions representatives of 24 different tribes. On the 3d of December one-third of the tribe were admitted to the Sacrament of Baptism; on December 25th, besides some Nez Percesand Blackfeet, 118 more Ffatheads received the Sacra ment of Regeneration. But the missionaries had come to teach the Indians not only to prepare for the life to come, but also to eke out regu lar living in this world. That same fall of 1841 a piece of land was fenced in and worked for seed. Seed, consisting of a few bushels of oats, wheat and potatoes, was secured at Fort Colville, Wash., over 300 miles distant, by Father...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 329 the Society of Jesus. He escorted the missionaries some dis tance, and upon his return home, to his great delight, he met another missionary band, just arrived from Europe in answer to his call for laborers. He then journeyed to Europe, where he fanned the enthusiasm for his work into a blazing flame of fire. He gathered abundant means, secured four new priests, among whom was the now famous Father Ravalli, a lay Brother and a colony of Sisters. They sailed from Antwerp in December, 1843, doubled Cape Horn and reached Fort Vancouver in August, 1844. It was during this European trip that Father De Smet had an audience with Pope Gregory XVI., by whom he was offered the episcopal dignity, which the humble missionary declined. By various and persistent efforts he had within four years enlisted in the service of the Indians eleven priests, six lay Brothers and a colony of Sisters. He distributed them among different tribes and assumed the gen eral superintendence...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

33 The Indian Advocate. The President is desirous to engage you to attend the army for Utah, to officiate as chaplain. In his opinion your services would be important, in many respects, to the public interest, particularly in the present condition of our affairs in Utah. Having sought information as to the proper person to be employed, his attention has been directed to you, and he has in structed me to address you on the subject in the hope that you may con sider it. not incompatible with your clerical duties or personal feelings to yield to his request. As a patriotic citizen, he accepted. At the conclusion of peace, his little diplomatic mission to the Indian tribes of Utah being ended, he tendered to the Secretary of War his resig nation of the office of chaplain. It was, however, not accept ed, because a new war had just broken out against the Gov ernment among the tribes of the Rocky Mountains. He was notified by telegraph to proceed to New York and embark there with Gen. Harn...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 331 six horses were entirely worn out and unfit for making so long a journey; they were all more or less saddle-galled, and not being shod, their hoofs were worn in crossing the rocky bot toms of the rivers and the rough mountain roads. In this difficulty I ordered a little skiff to be made at Fort Benton. On the way along the Missouri I met thousands of Indians of different tribes. I always stopped a day or two with them. I received the greatest marks of respect and affedlion from these hitherto untutored children of the plains and mountains, and they listened to my words with the utmost attention." In 1871 Father De Smet sailed again for Europe. In his native land he was made a Knight of the Order of Leopold, an honor which few attain, and one which he held in common with Marshal McMahon, former President of the French Re public. During this, his last journey, he met with an unfortu nate accident. This, together with years of exposure, had shattered his iron c...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

332 The Indian Advocate. j P Death Customs of the Indians, & - HE Otoe and Missouri Indians always preserve I the body from being touched by the earth; the oinancnes go 10 me opposite extreme, vv ueu a Comanche is dying, while the death-rattle may yet be faintly heard in the throat, and the natural warmth has not yet departed from the body, the knees are strongly bent upon the chest and the legs flexed upon the thighs. The arms are also flexed upon each side of the chest, and the head bent forward upon the knees. A lariat, or rope, is now used to firmly bind the limbs and body in this position. A blanket is then wrapped around the body and this again tightly corded, so that the appearance when ready for burial is that of an almost round and compact body, very unlike the confused pall of his Wichita or Caddo brother. The body is then taken and placed in a saddle upon a pony, in a sitting posture, a squaw usually riding behind (though sometimes one, on either side of the horse) ho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 333 times stones are placed over the whole. The best pony owued by the deceased is brought to the grave and killed, that the departed may appear well mounted and caparisoned among his fellows in the other world. Formerly, if the deceased were a chief or man of consequence and had large herds of ponies, many were killed, sometimes amounting to 200 or 300 head in number. An amusing story is told in illustration of the importance attached to the pony provided for the deceased in the happy hunting-grounds. An old chief died who was very poor and had no friends or relations. The people thought that any kind of a pony would do for him, so an old, dilapidated, lop-eared, scraggy pony was killed at his grave. However, to their great astonishment, he returned a few weeks laer on the same old mummy pony, and he was worn out with hunger and fatigue. When the men of his tribe saw his hollow cheeks and sunken eyes they fled from him in consternation. He begged for food, and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

334 The Indian Advocate. differing from those of other tribes. Instead of the property of the deceased being disposed of among the relations, it is all destroyed or buried in the ground. It is believed that when the goods are burnt they ascend to heaven in the smoke, and will thus be of service to the owner in the other world. Im mediately after death the relatives begin a peculiar wailing, and the immediate relatives of the family take off their cus tomary apparel and clothe themselves in rags and cut them selves across the arms, breast and other portions of the body until sometimes a fond wife or mother faints from loss of blood. This is also customary among the Dakota Indians. A missionary at Fort Snelling related the story of a woman who had lost a brother. With her friends she set up a most piteous crying, or rather wailing, which continued during all the night. She would keep on repeating the words which in English would mean, "Come, my brother, I shall see you no more forever...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

335 Story of Another Good Thief, The Indian Advocate. EVERAL stories are related of Abbot Paohnutius' I encounters with robbers in the deserts of Egypt. Here is a characteristic one with a twang of humor in it: The good old monk was one day hailed by a band of brigands to their cave, where they amused them selves poking fun at him. At last the captain spoke, with a half-drunken leer: "I know it's been a long time since you drank any wine. Now, here's a glassful, and if you don't drink it, I'll cut off your head." "I shall not refuse you the pleasure of seeing Paphnutius drink a glass of wine," said the monk, smiling, and he tossed off the wine at a draught." The robber was disconcerted at this unexpected action, and reflecting a moment, had the sense to admire the saint's prudence and courage. He asked the Father's pardon. "Why, my son," responded he, "you have not offended me. On the contrary, I hope God will reward you for the glass of wine you have given me, and will accord you t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

336 The Indian Advocate. The Church Suffering, -- -1 Pray for the holy souls who wait ' For Mary's messenger to come "&. And open wide the prison gate - . ,. Which bars them from their Father's home. ,. - God wills it that your prayers should send 1 That messenger with greater speed. J Ah! pray for them, and they will lend Assistance in your hour of need. Pray for the holy souls who stand And view, "with fond, expectant eyes, The confines of the Promised Land, Where Heaven's shining towers rise. Your hands are filled with treasures rare, More worth than ever ransomed king; To ransom them, with praise and prayer, Your treasures to God's altar bring. t Perhaps among those souls is one Whose death came like a dark eclipse, , To veil with night your noon-day sun, ' And check the glad song on your lips. Ah! cease your cries of bitter pain; ' Before the throne of mercy bow, J Ana let your voice arise again In songs of sweet petition now. Pray for the holy souls when they The beatific ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 337 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE : 11 .L-L , . ., .. ., , it 1 ii ruuiisncu py mc ueneaicune rainers 01 11 A j tT SAOREI) HEART MISSION, OICEjAHOMA. t X- A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved hy our Regular Superiors. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION I Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PRIVILEGEHl i. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate n all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factor...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

338 The Indian Advocate. Be what you wish others to become. Let yourself, and your words, preach. Really learned persons never think of having finished their education, for they are students for life. Our influence is measured and expressed by our example. We can lead others no farther than we go ourselves. ,, None of us is so great but that he may one day need the help, or feel the unkindness of the meanest of mortals. , Spare minutes are mighty laborers, if kept to their work. They overthrow or build up, enrich or impoverish a man. How dare we presume to judge our neighbors, when our conclusions and judgments very often rest upon the quicksand of conjecture. Many men carry their conscience like a drawn sword, cut ting this way and that, in the world; but sheathe it and keep it very soft and quiet when it is turned within, thinking that a sword should not be allowed to cut its own scabbard. - The way things are going on in France, it looks as if the French Government, having receiv...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 339 continually till it rolls its mission completely into the broad ocean of eternity. Bad books and trashy literature are proving the downfall v . of the youth of the country. Legislatures and municipalities have legislated against the sale of the cigarette, but have left this deadlier poison a free circulation. Vice and vulgarity are the chief dishes served by the daily press. It should not be wondered at, then, that crime, sensuality and infidelity are on (f the increase. The acts of the individual are the concrete re sults of the thoughts upon which the mind is constantly dwelling. The late Pontiff, Pius IX., adds this to the glory of his un exampled long reign: that he raised to the highest honor in the gift of the Church militant and triumphant, the last and the first Doctor of the Latin Church St. Francis of Sales, Prince-Bishop of Geneva, and St. Hilary of Poitiers. But the present gloriously reigning Pontiff, in his love for real progress and right lite...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

34-o The Indian Advocate. Governor Taft will not thank the enterprising sectarians who have nominated him, jointly with the slippery Aguinaldo and the renegade Buencamino, among the honorary presidents of the "Philippine Catholic Church," a new sect founded ex pressly for the benevolent assimilation of the Filipino soul. The name, writes The Ave Maria, is the only impressive fea ture of the new enterprise which has not been taken seriously even by the secular press. Says the Boston Transcript: ' 'We do not think that the Pope will be at all disturbed by the news, or that the Cardinals will discuss it in whispers. It looks like an impudent little challenge from an impotent source in fact, so contemptible that it is likely to die a-borning, without even receiving the honor of an obituary." This is treating the new venture a little too cavalierly; the new "church" may at least be hailed as a symptom of civili zation. The Filipino, having learned to swear, get drunk and found new religi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 341 numerous forms of dishonesty, says The New Worlds corrup tion, murder, stealing and other disregard for the sacred rights of others indicate the presence of some bad leaven in our social system. They are not accidental. They have their cause. Dead bodies found every day in out-of-the-way places, along the watery deep, or on the river banks, teach sad lessons. There seems to be little conscience left. There is some bad leaven in our social system. There is only one effective de terrent in the commission of crime. It is not a multiplicity of laws, potent as they may be; it is not a policeman with a club; it is not a penitentiary cell. It is love of God and fear of Him, a knowledge of His commandments, which gives a consciousness that there is a Supreme Judge who will either here or hereafter deal with every one according to his works. The idea of God and His commandments must be taught in the school-room. A Thanksgiving Song. We bless our God for wondrous weal...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

342 The Indian Advocate. On All Souls' Day, l.l.W'lill'r ylteiljB HERE is one SDot to which the heart of the T Catholic Christian turns on this saddest yet most i: t . -t i.i - t?i : i - tu uuiisuimg rcasi ui me xccmsiasuccu ytra-i, uic Day of all Souls. One spot hallowed by associa tions the most tender, sympathy the most pro found, affection the most fervent, sadness the most poignant, tempered though it be by the firmest faith, the sublimest hope, the deepest charity. It is the sacred spot where lie the re mains of those who, while they trod this mundane sphere, were our nearest and dearest, the sharers of our joys and sorrows, now placed, by the solemn mystery of death, in even more tender relations with those whose feet have not yet crossed the silent portals that place of sanctified repose, so fitly called by our German friends "God's holy acre" "the voiceless land, the place of graves." Let us, then, turn our steps with the others to yonder churchyard where those "Who wait an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 343 to station of the Sorrowful Way we follow the mourners, and never were impetrations more fervently made than those in voked under the gray November skies beneath the shadow of the great black crucifix carried, fit standard of suffering, sor row and redemption, from Gethsemane to Calvary. Here they lie, they who have loved us, toiled, wept and suffered for us fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers and friends. Here they lie, they with whose faults and imperfections we may, in other days, have been impatient, but the memory is all the more harrowing that we may not atone for that impatience save in one way by fervent and unceasing prayer. Here they He alas I some, perhaps, with whom we have sinned, or who have sinned on our account through excess of affection. For us, there is still time; for them, time is no more; in darkness and desolation they must make their sad atonement. Here they lie, friends and enemies, side by side, and scattered through the groups of g...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

T'WJfc'' 344 The Indian Advocate. n it The Need of the Hour. I HTS is rallpd thp "Acrp nf Prncrrpss." thp "Afrp. of " ' I Reason," the "Age of Enlightenment." It is true mat tms age nas witnessed progress as stu pendous as it was unexpected. The light of sci ence has opened up to the mind paths long dark ened by the clouds of ignorance; it has enabled the mind to strengthen and extend its sway over the forces of matter, and, through its researches and discoveries, to improve the condition of hu man life. But humanity seems to be stifled by the fumes of material success, and, forgetful of its God, is hastening blindly towards a moral chaos. From the inner most depths there arise dull murmurs of unrest, and rankling hatred, and guarded distrust, which proclaim the lamentable and terrible absence of an indispensable something. True it is that men no longer worship the feathered gods of the South Sea islands, or the misshapen logs of Africa, but they have set up unto themselves new idol...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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