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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

July 1997 Cattle producers in Virginia big on quality (Continued from page 1) County. "Prices are back on the rise, but not where they should be. "It costs 30 percent more to produce feed than five years ago," Tate noted. "It costs $300 to feed a cow for a year. When she has a calf, you raise the calf six to seven months until it gets to about 500 pounds. You have to feed the calf creep feed, and that's $100. You've got vet bills for worming shots and so on, and that's $30." Tate might spend $430 to produce a steer that sells for $500, he said. "You've got to sell a lot of calves to make any money in this business," he added. To get more return on his investment, Tate sells seed stock, which are high-quality cattle that are used for breeding. "Instead of getting only $500 for a heifer, we advertise and market our cattle as seed stock and get $750 for a heifer," he explained. "That's kept us alive." Red Angus cattle, because of their color, are less affected by heat than black Angus....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

Farm Bureau News Scientists hooked on fish, shrimp, and crabs Editor's note: This is the fifth in a continuing series about Virginia's 12 agricultural research and Extension centers. By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist HAMPTON—Virginia Seafood Research & Extension Center scientists are hooked on fish, shrimp and crabs. That's because the center's mission is to "provide Extension and research that benefits the seafood industry, Virginia's coastal areas, and the state, in general," said the center's superintendent, Dr. Mike jahncke. The research center, one of 12 that Virginia Tech has across the state, is the only one focused on the seafood industry. "If people in the seafood industry have a problem or a question, this is the first place they stop," Jahncke said. The VSREC, located in a 16,000-square-foot former oyster shucking and crab packaging plant, was established in 1975. It's between two seafood processing plants along the Hampton waterfront. The building...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

July 1997 Viewing Virginia Kudzu control on Virginia farms another role for goats ETTRICK—Kudzu, the monster vine that can grow a foot a day and literally take over a landscape, may finally have met its match—a hungry goat. Researchers at Fort Valley State University in Georgia have proven that kudzu contains many of the nutrients goats need, and that goats will eat kudzu and other weeds even before grass. "Goats will also attack other invasive weed species," said Terry Gipson, a Cooperative Extension goat specialist at Virginia State University. "North Carolina State has done extensive work in looking at multi-flora rose and other vine plants that invade pastures and found that goats will more or less eliminate those." Weed control is just another use farmers are finding for goats in Virginia, Gipson said. Cattle owners could get double use out of a pasture if they graze a few goats before them, he explained, because the percentage of grass in a pasture has Contest can improve publ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

Farm Bureau News Skewer up a summer supper Summer nights with dinners on the grill are a perfect way to relax after busy days of work or play. Instead of burgers or chicken the next time you cook out, skewer up some kabobs that will dazzle your family. They're quick and easy but so distinctive that it looks like you're expecting company for dinner. These all-in- one meals save you time and clean up. Almost any of your favorite meats and vegetables can be combined, brushed with barbecue sauce, salad dressing or marinade and tossed onto the grill for a fabulous meal that's ready in minutes. Some of the best kabob-worthy meats include sirloin tips, chunks of tenderloin or flank steak, pork tenderloin cubes, chicken or turkey breast pieces, smoked turkey sausage slices, shrimp, scallops or pieces of any firm fish such as tuna, salmon or swordfish. Besides being nutritious, kabobs are also easy on your budget. Go light on the meat, and load up on the vegetables. Two to three ounces of me...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

July 1997 (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the 10TH of each month preceding the publication month. > Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. > Ads MUST include member number to be published. 4 (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

Farm Bureau News Virginia beef in demand (Continued from page 9) Virginia's feeder cattle," said Graves. "We've also made personal visits to feedlots in the Midwest. "There's a consistent demand for our cattle in Pennsylvania," Graves said. Many Virginia cattle go to Pennsylvania and then wind up as high-quality beef in white table cloth restaurants, as well as the kosher trade and high-quality export markets, such as Japan. Virginia is an Angus-based state, and Angus is known for marbling, which makes for a tasty blend of muscle and fat. "Restaurants and the export market demand high choice to prime, while supermarkets demand low choice to high select quality grades," Johnson said. Farmers get $ 150 grant for ROPS (Continued from page 10) on your equipment," Dudley said. "The risk is so great and the cost is so small, especially with Farm Bureau's grant program." The Farm Bureau's Safety Program is offering a $ 150 grant to farmers who retrofit their tractor with a factory ROPS and...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

July 1997 'Strangers' help shoppers in grocery checkout line Shoppers at seven grocery stores in Virginia got a pleasant surprise June 18 when strangers approached them and offered to pay part of their grocery bills. The "strangers" were representatives of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, and they were out to make a point: Farmers receive only 22 cents out of every dollar a customer pays for food. To emphasize that point, the VFBF paid 22 percent of selected customers' food bills at certain I ,' -^fcj^aifcag Muff jR. riflrtlM BHbi • 1 - : \|u BjfflHK • Hl' ™ • mm '- Tylfc * ' >'%y ' mwmWm , «jm ||2 f I '^j ®j| V | ERIC MILLER/FBN wants to be a rtiorti when slie grows up. t j He wants to It now when lie 11 get luncli. J You just want tliem protected forever. :v % ■ rfwj WUI, cr if s protecting your family tlirougli ok W Jpjjp j^G| home, aufo or life insurance, we ve got flie coverage «■ ■ *I v 111 'slSSffill *4 ' „jPߧ|jtes|>* „, : you need to plan (or llie ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

■■■ — >1^ Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. fIHKKI| We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, personalized service can be as close as your own community. ar Broad Range of • If you are under age 65 — for Individuals or families k Coverage • If y OU are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. pE£y£f| You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! wfcii® Nearly 1,000 teens Virginia's horse race- Scientists look for ways Sho...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

Farm Bureau Volume 56, Number 7 New migrant worker law would help farmers By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist A new and improved Migrant and Seasonal Worker Protection Act wouldn't hold farmers responsible for the actions of their workers. "That's been the problem with MSPA all along—it holds the farmer responsible for things that are out of his hands," said Accomack County tomato grower Lynn Gayle. MSPA requires an employer of migrant or seasonal agricultural workers to comply with a seemingly endless number of rules on employment, transportation, housing and other labor contracting. Under the current MSPA, the U.S. Department of Labor "is trying to hold farmers responsible for things he's not aware of," said Bryan Little, director of governmental relations for the American Farm Bureau Federation. Pettiness abounds in the current law. If migrant workers, for example, remove the screen door from the house in which they are staying, the farmer gets fined by the DOL for a ho...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

Farm Bureau News Center benefits majority of Virginia's farmers Editor's note: This is the sixth in a continuing series about Virginia's 12 agricultural research and Extension centers. By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director GLADE SPRING—From fighting blue mold in burley tobacco to creating sound rotational grazing systems for livestock, the Southwest Virginia Agriculture Research and Extension Center is an important player for a majority of the state's farmers. The center is nestled on 200 picturesque rolling acres in Washington County. It has the charge of studying various forage crops which feed the state's multi-million dollar cattle and sheep industries. It also is the site of hands-on testing for the region's 3,000 burley tobacco growers. Extension agents here also experiment with Christmas trees, pumpkins and other alternative crops. But its involvement with the area's staple crop, burley tobacco, is somewhat limited. When funding cuts hit a decade ago, the burley research...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

August 1997 Tobacco brings millions of dollars into Virginia Those who don't think tobacco is important to the economy of Virginia should consider these facts: ■ In 1996, the golden leaf generated cash receipts straight from the farm of $194 million. ■ Forty-seven of Virginia's 98 counties grow either flue-cured, burley or dark fired tobacco on 8,400 farms. ■ The Old Dominion is the sec- Less private land could boost taxes Just how much is too much fed-erally-owned land? That's the big question hanging over a $700 million debate in Con- gress. The Clinton administration would like to spend more than $700 million for land acquisition. The bulk of the money would be spent on two projects out west: acquiring a controversial gold mine that neighbors Yellowstone National Park and buying up 7,500 acres of privatelyowned old-growth forest in northern California. Backers argue that Yellowstone, often referred to as the "crown jewel" of America's park system, is a national treasure and that ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

Farm Bureau News Slow-growing grasses te (Continued from page 2) mals received no supplement of grain. Early results were encouraging. The staff was able to put up to 400 pounds of weight gain on a steer strictly from year-round grasses. "This lets the cattle do the work," Brock said. It also saves producers from purchasing expensive hay and other feed for the winter months. "We want to minimize harvested forages, and maximize forage," Brock explained. "This is a way to show producers that they can background and feed all year." A similar project is under way with sheep. "Sheep are basically small cattle," Brock said, referring Va. farmers lead in tax protest WASHINGTON — When American Farm Bureau Federation President Dean Kleckner dumped 70,000 "Kill the Death Tax" letters on the desk of House Speaker Newt Gingrich June 24, more than 10 percent of them came from Virginia. In fact, Virginia farmers and Farm Bureau members wrote more letters to Congress than any other state. These we...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

August 1997 Search is on for the farm woman of the year It's almost that time of year again—time to recognize farm families and their contributions to agriculture. If you know a woman who "does it all" on the farm, nominate her for our 1998 Farm Woman of the Year contest. We're always looking for women who wear many hats. For example, our 1997 Farm Woman of the Year, Margaret Douglas, keeps her eggs in many baskets. On the Frederick County farm she and her husband own, she What Are The Chances Of Entering A Long Term Care Nursing Facility? ... 40% of people in Virginia over 65 will enter a nursing home facility* ... their stay will cost them between $75,000 to $125,000** Bkll Some Benefits of Our Plan Are: Care or Assistance Received in Your Home . Home Maker or Companion Services Personal care attendant Alternative care facility Note: This ad mentions, hut does not intend to describe, all the benefits, restrictions, exclusions and terms of the long term care policies available. Ful...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

Farm Bureau News Estate planning can help retain family farm By G.E. "NICK" BORST Special to the Farm Bureau News Estate taxes have received considerable attention on Capitol Hill with a focus on their impact on family farms. Some children, in families with a long tradition of farming, have discovered they cannot continue farming after their parents die because the farm must be sold to pay death taxes. As an estate-planning attorney in Fauquier County, I have witnessed first-hand how farms bought three or four decades ago have increased in value to the extent that estate taxes can prevent families from keeping their farms. No one can say what estatetax relief will ultimately come from pending Congressional proposals or whether any such relief will specifically target the family farm. However, there are steps now available to protect assets from estate taxes within current tax laws that are routinely overlooked at great cost in unnecessary taxes. The biggest mistake made by married c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

August 1997 ARCH STEEL BUILDINGS Economy - Quality - Service IT f~ irrT " Bhm**"* ' ' I " j | ;y ~ < ■ BB fl ' t .. im i i i,,! „i>iw ii ri in-Tir-rmrr '—, hbs| '«•'' .?j|H MffßVHff Widths 10' to 100',any length. Fast delivery, easy to build, factory direct. Ask about our free catalog. Call 1-800-341-7007 Us'i A STEc'JTTIaSTcR Visit the Virginia Farm Bureau web site Visit the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation web site for information about the organization and the agriculture industry. The address is: http://www.fb.com/vafb. iff fig'' . 0 fflfmM ■' wl 8S VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU TOWN & COUNTRY INSURANCE COMPANY VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU FIRE & CASUALTY INSURANCE COMPANY • SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Gardeners find beauty at Andre 1 Viette's farm By TESS MATTHEWS Special to the Farm Bureau News FISHERSVILLE—Andre' Viette is in the garden with his perennials, those hardy plants that come...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

Farm Bureau News Space-age agriculture moving into Virginia Precision ag helps farmers boost yield By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RlCHMOND—Satellites used to help U.S. artillery guns pinpoint targets, but now they're helping farmers locate weeds. With access to U.S. Department of Defense satellites, agriculture has been ushered into the space age. Several dozen Virginia farmers are practicing what is known as precision farming. They are working toward using precision to control the use of chemicals, fertilizers and seeds on fields. In its most sophisticated form, precision farming or precision agriculture uses powerful computer programs to map fields, based on soil tests and yield records. Then the farmer applies customized amounts of seed, fertilizer and crop protectant chemicals. David Taliaferro, an owner of Monta- gue Farms in Essex County, is using pre- cision agriculture. Sitting in his office beside a cornfield, he turned on a computer and pulled up a map showing a fi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

August 1997 Corn growers increase acreage in Virginia By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —Virginia farmers have planted an extra 50,000 acres of corn in hopes of re-experiencing last year's great prices and yields. In all, they planted 500,000 acres of corn this year. Recordbreaking prices allowed some Virginia growers to receive more than $5 a bushel in 1996. Farmers last year saw prices that were the highest ever. This summer, however, dry weather has destroyed thousands of acres of corn. It will also reduce yields, not only in cornfields, but also in fields of cotton, soybeans and peanuts. With an average yield of 126 bushels per acre last year, Virginia reached its highest average yield ever, said Jim Lawson, deputy statistician with the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. "Last year, the corn was so tall that 1 was sitting up in a combine and couldn't see the other combines in the field," said James Fogg, a corn grower in King and Queen County. Healthy corn i...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

Farm Bureau News Hands-on school experience helps retain skills (Continued from page 1) agriculture. The lab began in 1987 with an aquaculture pond, paid for by the Charlotte County School Board. Jones said he thought that if there was a way students could get hands-on experience at school, they would be more likely to retain the skills he was teaching. "You don't connect with education until you can apply it," Jones said. As an example, Jones recalled his students' construction of a barn on the farm. They had to square the sides of the barn by using an algebraic equation: a 2 +b2 = c 2. They just didn't realize it, Jones said. When artificially inseminating cows on the farm, the students learn both anatomy and reproduction, Jones explained. Math skills are handy in ag classes CHARLOTTE COURT HOUSE— Math and science are an integral part of agriculture education classes at Randolph Henry High School. During the 1996-97 school year, 230 of the school's 700 students were enrolled in on...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

August 1997 Precision ag uses chemicals more efficiently (Continued from page 8) Private companies, however, are likely to launch new satellites and compete for agriculture industry subscribers, and this will bring down the price. Precision ag is more popular among farmers in the Midwest than in the South, according to Progressive Farmer magazine. Yet, the South has more high-value crops, such as cotton and peanuts, and that more easily justifies the cost of precision ag equipment. Plus, soil varies even more in the South, which calls for a greater need to vary seed and fertilizer rates, the magazine reported. Insect problems are worse in the South. "Variable rate technolo- Researchers consider changing planting schedule (Continued from page 9) and August," Brann said. "The water uptake of corn in July and August can be a quarter of an inch a day. It can drink a quarter of an inch of rain a day. Every four days, it needs 1 inch of rain." During July, most Virginia corn pollinates an...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1997

Farm Bureau News See how your elected officials voted on issues What follows is a concise record of how your elected officials voted on important issues related to agriculture. You may find this useful as you decide who should get your vote on election day on Nov. 4. Laws are listed as HB (House Bill) and SB (Senate Bill), with a brief explanation of the law. 1996 HB 1181 Allows 102-inch trailers on all Virginia highways. Farm Bureau wanted a yes (y) vote. HB 1222 Allows a 25 percent tax credit on expenditures up to $70,000 on conservation practices, such as lit- SENATE 1996 1997 Barry, Warren E Benedetti, Joseph B Boiling, William T. Chichester, John H Colgan, Charles J Couric, Emily Earley, Mark L Edwards, John S Gartlan, Joseph V., Jr. ... Goode, Virgil H., Jr. * . . . Hanger, Emmett W., Jr. . . Hawkins, Charles R Holland, Richard J Houck, R. Edward Howell, Janet D Lambert, Benjamin J., 11l . Lucas, L. Louise Marsh, Henry L., 11l Martin, Stephen H Marye, Madison E Maxwell, W. Hen...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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