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Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirr... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,106 items from Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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BRUSHES WITH DEATH. AT THE LAST MOMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

BRUSHES WITH DEATH. AT THE LAST MOMENT. Few have had narrower escapes from a tragic death than the men of St. tCilda, when searching for sea-birds' eggs, suspended by a rope from the siunmit of cliffs several hundred feet high. Of one such es cape the following thrilling story is told. The egg-hunter had been lowered over the cliff, when sud denly a loop that had been made in his rope, with the object of shorten ing it, caught in a projecting pin nacle. The sudden jerk slipped the knot of the loop, and down the climber dropped some thirty feet in to space, until he was brought up with a terrific jerk. When he recovered his senses, he saw on looking up, that the fall had cut his rope nnd that he was hanging by a single strnni. To add to his horror the men at the top of the cliff, ignorant of what had happened, began to haul him up. At any "second the frail . strand might break, and precipitate him to certain death two hundred feet or more below. There was only one chance of saving hi...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE RANGE AT SEA. PAINTING A VIVID WORD-PICTURE OF BATTLESHIP TARGET PRACTICE. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

THE RANGE AT SEA. TAINTING, A VIVIl) WORD-PIC TURK OF BATTLESHIP TAR GET PRACTICE. ' The grey battleship stents stran gely deserted and bare, for hor decks are denuded of men, while nil ^ rails and other upstnniing encum brances have been laid lint on deck. The gun-turrets, fivo of them, are .trained round with the long, lean muzzles of- tholr twin weapons . pointing out over the sea, and every .now and then one of the guns twit ches ever so slightly, or a turret revolves a little, ns the gunlayers keep their sights aligned on the distant target, .^on 33.5's the ship carries arc powerful weapons. Kadi one of them is ovor 50ft. long, and weighs close on 80 tons, w^ilo thoir 1 ,2501b shells can bo hurled to a distance of over fifteen m.iles. The enormous projectiles, too, leave the muzzles at the rate of over 1,800 miles an hour, 'and can pene trate the 'thickest armour afloat'at ? a range of 5,000 yards. ' £t-'l J INSIDE THE TURRETS.. . .. Hut now, as the" shi[i""mdVes" "'dn . throug...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Turtle Picnic at Night. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

A Turtle Picnic at Night. The hordes of purple and . white crabs that fled on tiptoe at our ap : proach, halting: at a safe distanco to turn round und stand upright, hissing and spitting defiance, so amused and absorbed us as to dis tract our attention from the pur pose in hand. Not that of Sad die, however, for, with a hoarse yell to tho stragglers behind, he did an astonishing grand circus act, and, not stopping to halt and Kneel' the camel, hurled himself like the arms of windmill, to tho ground and rushed forward to intercopt it huge, crawling monster of a tur tle ho espied that had nearly made its escapo into the breakers. The other men joining htm, the curious creature was soon tilted and turned over on its back, a helpless fury of Happing flippors and snapping jaws. The camels indulged in ridi culous thrills, panics and strange antics at sight of the fearsomo lieASts and a camel doing a mas sett! in the chaste light of the moon is not a dignified sight, and still looked askan...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IF YOU TRESPASS. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

IP YOU TRESPASS. Trespassing is defined legally to be .the-entering uponythe land of another without his permission or against his will. A trespasser may be ''peaceably ejected." , Damages, nominal or otherwise, can be claim-' e<l for trespass without actual loss having to bo proved. Actual damage to hedges, crops, etc., may be dealt with as a crime-malicious damage to pro perty- nnd the punishment may. be a fine or a terra of imprisonment. It is an offence to set man*traps or spring guns on land as a pro tection against possible trespassers or poachers. . A trespasser accom panied by a dog' which worries cuttle or sheop is liable for all damage, even if-fao pleads that the dog has never doao damage before. No first bite is allowed.

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER VI. DUGDALE DINES WITH THE FAIRY QUEEN. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

CHAPTER VI. DUGDALE DINES WITH THE FAIRY QUEEN. As yet Dugdale was not conscious of having done anything extraordin ary, unless his boldness in the face | of the autocrat mi£ht be looked up . on in that light. ; He had carried his point. The general callcd him a fool, and per* haps time might prove him to be such, but just at present he felt like rejoicing over the fact that he had pained the privilege of seeing this bright little lady of £he proscription as often as he pleased, and even sharing her journey out of the country. What would she say ? He winced a little under the fenr lest she might ; think him bold to thus force his company on her unasked. He was settled, in the belief that she could not be the Vera Orlofl of whom so many startling stori«s had gone the rounds of the continental press, and was more, than puzzled to understand why so bluff and truthful a soldier as General Gratscheff could { defile his Hps with a deliberate lie in | order to deceive him - perhaps to . ma...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER V. THE BEAR GROWLS. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

CHAPTER V. THE BEAR GROWLS.' "Now that you know who the.laiy is, monsieur, of course you rccognise the danger of continuing am ac l quaintance begun under such romaa j tic conditions?" continued the gene ! ral, in hie ordinary icy tone, while his teeth came together with a roap that reminded Owen of th« closing jaws of a rat-trap. "Do you moan to my pcace o! mini or in a political sense ?" he asked. "I have nothing to do "with your pcace of mind, monsieur ; but it is of importance to me to make sure that the lady I am sent to watch does not find friends this side of the border. Once across, pout 1 I wash mj hands of the whole business." "Then lam to understand from this, general, that you wish me to break ofl my acquaintance with this -a-charming, young woman with a history ?" | "Monsieur Dugdale is in error. I ( have not expressed a wiBh-it is my habit to command." j "Those who are under you." "Those who find' themselves inside the limits of my province. There is not a soul to-day ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why Things Have Rainbow Hues. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

Why Things Have Rainbow Hues. To break open an opal in order to observe its hues would bo the equivalent to killing the goose that laid the golden eggs. Neither gol den eggs nor rainbow hues would be found, for the opal lms no colour. Opal consists of hydrateil silica. It is not uniform in texture. If the word surface may be used for in terior conditions, it might be said that the opaline silica is in the form of surfaces and layers that lie com pactly against one another. These layers refract the light at various angles, giving forth Lhe coloured (lashes in the same way that a pure crystal prism refracts the colours of the spectrum. Techni cally speaking, these layers of sili ca are said to possess a different index of rofractipn from that of the matrix. As the opal is moved the various layers bre&lc the light in to colours, which change, of course, according to the position of the stone. The iridescence of nacre, or mother-of-pearJ, is also a matter of form and not actual ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. THE VALUE AND IMPORTANCE OF LUCERNE. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

T H E F A R M . I - THE VALUE AND IMPORTANCE OF ' I LUCERNE. One too of lucerne bay has the same feeding value as 60 bushels of oats. Lucerne- can be expected to average at least two tons per acre. This is the equivalent of 120 bushels of oats. There is no land that will averago 120 bushels of oats-in fact, it takes good, land and good hand ling to. average 60 bushels of oats per acre. The lucerne requires less work and less expense to handle than a grain crop. And .the lucerne will improve the soil while the oat crop will reduce its productive power. To : got this value from , lucerne it must .be--fed on the farm.. It needs to be kept in mind that the lucerne is a roughage. The securing of a stand of lucerne requires that, the conditions neces sary, to tbe "lucerne be supplied. These are : Organic matter in soil, best supplied by manure ; good dee" compact seed bed, best 'furnished when land is manured ; ploughed deep for' com and the corn clean cultiva ted. Lucerne needs bacteria....

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(Copyright.) CONVICT DAYS. VIVID AND REALISTIC PICTURES OF THE PAST. THE HUTKEEPER'S DAUGHTER. A TALE OF JOHN BATMAN. (Complete in Three Parts.) PART TWO. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

KCopyrlght.) CONVICT DAYS. "It can bo no other than that scoundrel olid murderer," he thought, '.and yet, It it ..wore « Iriend 1" As his eyeu became more accus tomod to the darkness be saw the figure move lor word slightly, aS it did so. Batman, with & gasp of i relief, recognised the uniform of a soldier. Without a moment's hesi- i tntion he challenged, and then shout-, ed his name. As he did so the j rtgtiro in the thicket rose and step ped out, revcalin? to Batman the well-known form of Corporal Barr,\, of Georgo Town. "The girl told us you'd be some where about here if Jeffries hadn't got yf*V spoke Harry, as, with cramped limbs, the young man stop ped painfully up to him. " We see'd the fire, but it might have fcin that ' red rapparee ' we're after," added the soldier. . I As he spoke several other wen came up, among them Do:tor Priest and Chaplain Youl, of the Tamar Settlement. "We were down at the station/' spoke the doctor, " when the young woman came, and wanted to...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DAIRY PASTEURISED MILK CHEESE. EXTRA COSTS OVER ORDINARY METHOD AS COMPUTED IN WISCONSIN BULLETIN, (Ninth instalment of Research Bulletin 27, Wisconsin Experimental Station, describing New Process of Manufacture of Cheddar Cheese from Pasteurised Milk.) [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

THE DAIRY PASTEURISED MILK CHEESE. ! EXTRA COSTS OVER ORDINARY METHOD AS COMPUTED IN WIS | CONSIN BULLETIN, i (Ninth instalment of Research Bulle tin 27, Wisconsin Experimental Sta tion, describing New Process of I Manufacture of Cheddar Cheese from I Pasteurised Milk.) j The extra cost of making pnstsuri ' sed milk cheese is given in the fol lowing figures, which are estimated for an outfit handling 2000 lb. of milk p«r hour and operated one hour per day. It is, of course, true thnt the charges against one pound would be reduced if the capacity of the out , fit or the daily time of operating it .were increased. The figures are re I garded as expressing the maximum extra costs of making cheesc by the new method, as compared with the old. The additional outfit required for making chfcese by the now process, consists of a receiving vat, a pasteu riser and cooler, and an acidulator. which latter can be home-made. It is assumed that the boiler and pump . in the factory are large enough ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Trivial Cause for a Duel. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

Trivial Cause for a Duel. * One morning a Prussian officer came to an inn and ordered a pickled herring, which was soori! brought to him in. a caper sauce. Not far-from him sat an Austrian officer, who spoko to Ihe Prussian thus : "That is something good, isn't it ? I have soen it grow myself in Italy." "You appear to be in a merry humour," replied the 1'ruMrian. "I must request you, however, not to talk such'nonsense." "There is no nonsense about it; I am perfectly serious," was the re ply After arguing * together in this strain for about ten minutes, the Prussian said, angrily, "I am tired of being humbugged with such non sense," and, growing very excited, ho shouted, "Come to-morrow morn ing at nine o'clock ill the wood sear by, with a second, and I will give you my answer with a bullet." "Right you arc," said the Aus trian, drinking up his wine. The next morning the two met, together with their friends, in the wood at the appointed time. The Austrian, as the insulted party, had ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Wild Woman of the Woods TWO MONTHS IN RAGS WITH ONLY ROOTS TO EAT. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

Wild Woman of the Woods TWO MONTHS IN RAGS WITH ONLY ROOTS TO BAT. The case of a woman wh* has | taken to tho woods and is living the life of & primitive human being, is pulling the police and people of Cbarly-sur-Marne, a village near Chateau Phierry (I«Yance). During the night of April tfc Mme. Sebastien, wife of a local farmer, a woman of 40 and the mother of three children, loft her home, wearing only a petticoat and slippers Early last month it was repo'rted that the missing woman had been seen wandering in the forest near Charley-sur-Marne, and it is now known that she has been for 54 days alone in t.he woods, miserably clad in rags, living like a primitive human being on herbs and rooto and slcoping in thickets. The first person who saw her was a woman who lives in a hut on the edge of the forest. She told the police she saw a human form, covcred only with rags, omergo from the wood and come toward her. The stranger, who was thin Jind hag gard, ran out into the . wood...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Perils of Diver's Work. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

Perils of Diver's Work. Referring to the death of a diver engaged on the Empress of Ireland Wreck, a writer in the "Manchester Guardian" says that the first sen sation felt vrbon the driver goes down to thirty feet or so below the surface is a singing in the ear*. This is due to the drum of the ear being stretched a little, and this in caused in turn by the fact that the air pressure on the outside has been Increased, while that on the in side is kept normal .for a few se conds longer by somo slight ob struction in tho Eustachian tube connecting the car with'the nose. Ordinarily a diver may descend , quite quickly to the scene of his work. But he must bo very care ful how he comes up, and the longer he remains down the more time must he take in coming up. The reason is that all the time h<t is down his blood is absorbing air. The greater the depth tho greater the pressure of the air, and the more of it he absorbs in a given time. His blood becomes aer ated like soda-water...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Got It. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 23 October 1914

Got It. A certain good-looking" portrait i painter got a commission to paint the portrait of a rich city mag note. He improvised a studio down at his country place in Kent, and spent about a couple- of months on the job. One day he said to the purse-proud money-bags : I think your countenance, sir, most mobile. Is there any particu lar expression you would like to wear in this picture "Well, since you a9k it, there is. I particularly want a certain ex pression. By the way, have you met my daughter ?" I "Yes," replied the artist. I "A chnrming girl, eh V .. ! "Very." ; "I'm glad you think so. "I've i spent a lot of monqy on that girl. Well, supposing you came to me and asked my consent to marry her ?" "Oh !" cried the painter. The magnate smiled. "Perhaps you don't quite follow me. At all events the expression I want. to wear in that picture the expression you .would see my lace on such an occasion. is the only illustration I can think of-a sort of combination of dis gust, standoffis...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Bank-notes in Wrecks. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 30 October 1914

Bank-notes in Wrecks. Although the chances of being able to do so are considered doubtful, since she lies in seven teen fathoms of water, the Cana dian Pacific Hallway have not yet 1 ubandoned all hope of refloating the Empress of Ireland. At any rate, every effort will l>e made to recover £200,000 worth of silver, in 163 bags, which is still in the specie-room of the sunken liner. The most notable salvage of sil ver during recent years was made after the Oceanu sank in the Chan nel in March, 1912, through col lision with the Pisagua. . The work was hindered by strong currents and tides, but during the succeeding threo months silver worth over £500,000 was recovered at a very low cost. The Oceana was lying quite upright; the Empress of Ire land turned turtle-obviously a very, much more difficult position for salvage work. * The £-200,000 worth of silver, however, represents but a small portion of the money which wont down with the ill-fated vessel; > for i thousands of pounds ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Royal Palace "Burglars." [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 30 October 1914

Royal Palace "Burglars.' The escapade of the adventurous Londoner who achieved notoriety ; recently by scaling the garden wall and entering Buckingham Palace by ] way of the servants' quarters recalls the story of the chemist's boy whom Sydney Smith nicknnmed "In-I-go" Jones, who three tfrnes in 18'K> and 3841 gained access to the pal ace by a means never discovered, and on one occasion continued se cretcd there for several days. The first time Jones entered the palace he was actually discovered under a sofa in a room next to that in which. Queen Victoria was sleeping, and on the second occasion he was founxl in a recess. This se cond escapado led to him being sent to prison for three months AS a rogue and vagabond; but even this punishment did not cure him of his fondness for invading the palace, for three months later he tried to got into the building again, only to be captured almost immediately by a' constable on duty. Instead of sending the boy to prison, however, the magist...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO CUT GLASS. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 30 October 1914

HOW TO CUT GLASS. There is a - method of cutting glass without tho aid of a dia mond which is very little known. Take a piece of common string and dip it in alcohol and squeeze it reasonably dry. Then tie tho string tightly around tho glass on the line of cutting. Touch a match to tho string and lot it burn off. Tho boat of the burning string will weaken the glass in this particular place. While it is hot . plunge the glass under water, letting tho arm go under well to the elbow s-o that there will be no vibration when the glass is struck. With the free hand strike the glass outsido tho lino of cutting, giving a quick, sharp stroke with any long flat in strument, such as a stick of wood or a long-bladed knife, und tho cut will bo as clean and straight as if made by. a regular glass cutter. At a recent "meet," tho hounds were ' in full cry across a large field, surrounded by a log hedge and a wide ditch. Presently there was a crash and a thud. Looking back, one of the huntsmen called...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mysterious Telegraph Between Hand and Brain. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 30 October 1914

Mysterious Telegraph Be tween Hand and Brain. ? « A mosquito stings you in the dark-how do you know exactly where . the sting Ims taken place and where to bring down your hand to "swot" the offending in sect 7 You feel it nt a certain point ; yes, but how does that particular point tell you it is being iiurt ? How do you know thnt the mosquito is stinging the back of jour hand and not your elbow, /or example ? It is a matter of nerves. Every part of the surface of the body is furnished with nerves ; the.se unite in bundles to form trunks that An ally end in the spinnl cord and are carried on to the brain, where they again spread out beneath the cor tex of grey matter, in groups, ac cording to what part the body they como from. The nerves of the face end in one spot in tho brain; those of the toes end in another ; those of the arms in another. Each convolution or fold of the brain is the centre of the nerve endings of some particular organ or part of Diagram of tho Tele graph System ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO CLEAN SINKS AND BATHTUBS. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 30 October 1914

TO CLEAN SINKS AND BATH TUBS. Permangamato! of potash salts thrown in sinks and bath tubs wiU deodorise all stagnant water and destroy all vermin that may have collected in the piping. It is harmless and any . amount will work until it is all used up. It does not colour .the porcelain 'fix tures, but should not be splash ed on the walls. That early training is the domi nating influence in character build ing, is the opinion of Dr. Edward Lyttclton,. in "The Corner-ft.tone of Education." . , . Gunter.'s chain, used in utcasarin£ land, was invented by Edmund Gvn Ur in 1606. ^1951.^ -

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN DIREST PERIL. RECOUNTING SOME THRILLING EXPERIENCES OF BIG-GAME HUNTERS. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 30 October 1914

IN DIREST PERIL. BEOOUNTING HOME THRTtJMXIS KXPKKIENCBS OF BIO-GAMR HTWTKRS. Mr. P. C. Selous, king of lip gave hunter*, h*3 survived a hun dred close bmiihes with death. He spent on« ttirilling night w*th lions prowling round his frail shelter of saplings. Three of the Hone he shot, with the blast oj their hot breath in his very faco, ia a crowded and glorious five min utes, But he ha* never had a nar rower escape than when a wound ed elephant charged him near the UmtaU RiTcr. In vain he spurred his horse; the poor beast was too worn out to gallop. Mr. Scions heard two blood-curdling screams ever his head. "All's up !" he thought, and then the tusk of the elephant crash ed with terrific force into his .horse's rear, and he was dashed to the ground. "Although stunned by the fall," he says, "X felt that I was unhurt ; but the smell of the elephant was very strong. And no wonder, for the huge animal was kneeling on me t ''Fortunately, I was thrown under its body, had 1 been in front o...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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