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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian -Advocate. 305 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE t t Published by the Benedictine Fathers of II 4 j I II SACRED HEART MISSION, OKLAHOMA, I A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION! Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PRIVILEOKSl 1. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 3. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered ever' First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4, Every year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living and one ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

VT" 306 The Indian Advocate. i The love of God has no horizon; neither .time nor space can bound it. The laziest men are generally willing enough to work hardships to others. A man's real disposition usually displays itself most strik ingly in small matters like light which gleams most brightly when seen through narrow chinks. We talk about the telescope of faith, but we think we want even more the microscope of watchful, grateful charity. Apply this to the little bits of your daily lives, in the light of the spirit, and how wonderful they come out! We may not take up the broken threads of the life that is gone and weave them into a web of joy and hope; but to those who are still left us, who have ears to hear and hearts to throb with pain and grief, we may be generous and just, forgiving, loving and kind. The straining efforts of men to appear smarter than their neighbors, induce them too often to break the bonds of pro priety. "As often as I have been amongst men," said a phi loso...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate. 307 being. Selfishness, ill-nature, impure desires, unworthy mo tives indulged in secret, will steadily transform the finest lines of the face. We should be surprised if we knew how much we show ourselves to our fellow-men in the daily walk of life. The only way of having a face that speaks well of the spirit's course is to have the spirit pursue a course that writes a good record on the face. A committee of Indians was lately in Washington to pro test against the allotment in severalty of the lands of their I u trihp. and Tamps Risr-T-Tpart- has hppn plprtpd C.hipf nf thp Osacrp .D XIlUlcUlS 111 VJKlcUlUIUcl U1I a. 11 cUlll-cUlUUimtlL pictliUllll. J. lit: WUIK of the Dawes Commission, says the Columbian is not popular among the aborigines. In our treaties with them we promised as long as grass grows and water ran to respect their common ownership of the lands. The activity evinced by the faithful in practical works of religion is very cheering to the hearts of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

308 The Indian Advocate. t "People grow old unnecessarily," says a writer. Wrong. People grow old because they can't help it. Occasionally -you find men who are still useful and vigorous at seventy-five and more, but such men inherit unusual health from their an cestors. They are not cheerful at seventy-five because of any "system." The average human machinery wears out in from sixty-eight to seventy-five years. The will-power has nothing to do with the kidneys or the liver. A man who accepts old age as a fact and acts as an old man should, will live longer than the old man who tries to be a boy and indulges in boyish dissipations when he should be in bed. The comments of some of the leading Protestant writers on the process of Catholization undergone by New England are naturally a little curious, because they aim to reconcile this religious revolution with the idea that Protestantism and Puritanism are nevertheless holding their own. Catholics can afford to smile at these puerile e...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate. 309 inspiration, saw clearly that there could exist no more certain method of curing the evils of his age than for man to return to Christ, who is the way, the truth and the life, by frequent meditation on the mysteries of that salvation which He won for us, and by recourse to that Virgin, to whom is given power over all heresies, as man's intercessor to God. With this object, that great Saint composed the formula of the Rosary, having for its end the meditation on the mysteries of salva tion combined with the recitation of a connected chain of the Hail Mary' and the occasional introduction of the Lord's Prayer. We, therefore, seeking a cure for similar evils, do not doubt that the form of prayer used by 'this holy man, with such benefit to all the world, will prove of like help in alle viating the miseries of our time." There has been an extraordinary subsidence of the start ling predictions of the rumor-mongers who so long and per sistently bent their energies...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

3io The Indian Advocate. The Daily Rosary, 4 S a Driest was one dav visitine the hosDitals of An- I twerp, he found there among the incurables an old soldier on whom, after he had heard his confession, he imposed, as a penance, to recite one rosary. When the soldier heard the word "rosary," he, like so many others, alasl could not make out vhat was meant by it, for he had but exchanged the plow for the sword, and thus remained ignorant of many of the practices of our holy re ligion. But when he heard what the rosary was, he con ceived such an ardor for this kind of devotion towards Our Blessed Lady that he told the priest: "Father, had I but known this devotion from my youth, I would not have spent a single day of my long life without reciting the rosary." At once he resolved to make up for what he had neglected, and, as the traveler who, seeing the sun disappearing on the hori zon before he has reached the end of his journey, redoubles his steps, so our brave soldier resolved to sa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

,v The Indian Advocate. 311 Such an answer would certainly have frightened even a strong and healthy young man, but not so our sick and aged soldier. Being even more and more inflamed with the love of Mary, her rosary scarcely ever left his hands. And because he prayed day and night, there was not a single day on which he did not say his thirty rosaries. Thus he arrived at the end of two years, and the rosaries also numbered twenty-one thousand nine hundred. The last day of these two years was also the last of his life, and our happy soldier went to receive in heaven the reward of his "daily rosary," the omission of which he had so heroically repaired. May this example encourage all the readers of the Indian Advocate not to let a single day pass by without having paid to our heavenly Mother a tribute of homage and love which is so agreeable to Her, and which will prove for ourselves a source of graces in this life and of joy and happiness in the next. Free education for the children...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

312 The Indian Advocate. j P & A Citizen's Duty, & -4 VERY individual has a calling, and through that IT calling he is supposed to contribute his share of gooa to Dnng nappmess to nimsen ana to nis fellow-man. This is a citizen's debt to his coun try, and must be performed to the best of his ability. But while laboring in such a cause he is also mindful of the debt his country owes to him. This debt is illustrated in the protection the citizen finds in the laws and institutions of his country. He knows that he is at liberty to wander afar, to the North, South, East or West, wherever there exists a civilized and recognized government, and, where ever he finds himself, he can look up to the emblem which represents his nation and know that he can appeal to that na tion and his cry will be listened to when he calls for justice. Thus we find that governments have been formed, and more especially our own American Government, not for the sake of establishing offices and holding ele...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate. 313 shore, worshiped heathen gods and depended upon her art and culture as a preservative against danger, but Greece has passed away and her ruined walls and shattered columns tell us of a state that was, but is not. The city of the Nile, with its vast army of brave soldiers, has long ago disappeared from the list and lives only in name. Thus we may go on naming cities and nations and giving the cause of their fall until the sound of their very names would grow monotonous. The path of history is punctuated by the ruins of nations that once flourished, prospered, but now live only in the immortal pages of history. But why this recital of ancient cities and their falls? There is a lesson here if we but hearken to it aye, a lesson we must learn if we would have this, our glorious republic, fulfill the mission which the God of nations has des tined for her. We see that the foundations of a government must not only be solid in themselves, but her citizens must also p...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

314 The Indian Advocate. nation on the face of the globe, but it is his duty to make it so if it lies within his power. He is not requested to go about helping his neighbor and neglecting his own welfare, but if it happens that he can do so without injury to himself, then, as a citizen, he is obliged to do so. The duty we Americans owe our country is sacred, but if you will note it is secondary with the duty we owe our God. To Him must be submitted all our acts, whether for self or for country; but in serving your God, you are also serving your country. The law of the Church may be the civil law applied to the nation, and by studying the question you will find that the better the Christian, the better the citizen. Honesty should dwell within the breast of every American citizen. But this principle is also included in his Christian code. Honesty should not only guide our people in all their adts for their own good, but also towards our neighbor. It should be kept prominently before u...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate. 315 zen should allow himself to act dishonestly by the sight of gold, but rather like Webster, who, when he was asked what was the sublimest thought that occurred to him during his career as a statesman, replied: "It was the thought of my individual responsibility to God." This same eminent states man has declared, "To preserve a government we must pre serve morals. Morality rests on religion. If you destroy the foundation, the superstructure must fall. When the public mind becomes vitiated and corrupt, laws are a nullity and con stitutions are waste paper." But have not our House of Rep resentatives and Senate gone beyond this? Political econo mists tell us there is one thing, and only one, on which society rests, and that is the home. Once destroy the sacred influ ence of that fountain-head of all government and our nation will go down with such a crash that the shock will be felt around the earth. Have not our Congress and Senate already done so? Has not the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

H 316 The Indian Advocate. rage. Do not hold in abhorrence all political parties; they are the outcome of free government, and while there exists a healthy rivalry, they are a benefit, rather than an evil. But we must not confound political factions with political parties. The latter strives for a principle, while the former struggles for the supremacy of their master, and it is through the power of factions much evil is brought about. But there are none of us who wo" Id not strive for principle, and those who enter the fight must teach our brethren those principles so necessary in our country. We must raise those beneath us to our own level by teaching them their duties as citizens, and right here, my Catholic citizens, is an opportunity for you to set the ex ample. There are none of .you who are not grounded in your faith. Put into practice the principles instilled into your youthful minds. Show to the world that to be a good citizen, it is necessary to be a good Christian. "Live ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate. 317 1 j Legendary Lore, fc 1 44 N the aeres of Faith the Qth of October was a erreat I I day in Paris, for on that day the Parisians cele brated their patron least. JNow, the uoddess 01 Reason usurps the patronage of this strange people. It is generally supposed that the St. Denis of France is Dionysius, the Areopagite, the friend and convert of St. Paul, and as such, his story is full of interest. Dionysius was an Athenian philosopher who, for his great wisdom in heavenly things, was called Theosophus, and, being a judge of the Areopagus, was called the Areopagite. He traveled into Egypt to study astronomy, and while there with his companion, the philosopher Appollophanes, at Heliopolis, they were greatly puzzled by a darkness which hung over the earth for three hours from mid-day. When he returned to Athens he found St. Paul there preaching The Unknown God. He sought him out, learned the story of Redemption, and recognized in the darkness of that day in Heliop...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

- ?pnrTrKF' "fp gysujii 'J w f llil ."'l. J1 , ,, 318 The Indian Advocate. name, arrived in Paris, and rinding it an exceedingly rich and large city, with fertile lands about and bright skies above it, it seemed to liim another Athens. He decided to fix his see here and began to teach the people the science of the Saints. He converted many and sent missionaries to all the provinces of France and even into Germany. St. Denis, with his friends, Rusticus and Eleutherius, were martyred by order of Emperor Domitian. They were be headed and their bodies buried on the spot now called Mont martre, and the first person to raise a church to their honor was St. Genevieve. In the reign of Dagobert the relics were transferred to the Abbey of St. Denis. The Saint's name was the war-cry of the French army in the days of chivalry. The famous oriflamme the standard of France was the banner consecrated upon his tomb. We turn now to two very humble Saints on the 25th of of October. Sts. Crispin and Cr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

v The Indian Advocate. 31'g Mine Heart is on the Rhine, Translated from the German of Wilhem Mutter. My heart is on the Rhine, the fairest of all lands, My heart is on the Rhine, where the homestead stands! Where my youth was passed, and where friendship glows, And my love like a rose in the garden shows; O, where I have reveled in song and in wine Wherever I go, my heart is on the Rhine! I greet thee, thou torrent, that down the mountain foams, I greet ye castles, ye villages and domes; Ye fields of corn in the valley green, And ye vine-clad hills in the sun's gold sheen; Ye rocks and woods, and ye waves that shine Wherever I go, my heart is on the Rhine! I greet thee, O Life, with a heart full of love For thy music, and thy wine sweet as nectar above; I greet thee, O grand and gallant German race, Whose men all are true, and whose women fair of face; May a life of love and success be thine Wherever I go, my heart is on the Rhine! My heart is on the Rhine, the fairest of all lands!...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

r- 320 The Indian Advocate. m LOCALS: The Scholastics attend the classes in school as usual. They resumed studies on Sept. 4th. A few new recruits have been added. We now have a daily train, and should have a daily mail to Asher. Slowly but surely the outside world is pushing its way towards us. Rev. D. Ildephonse, O. S. B., left the Abbey on 7th ult. for Leaven worth, Kans., where he is to be Chaplain at the Convent and Academy of the Sisters of Charity. -St. Mary's Academy has 45 Indian girlsJ Parents, congratulate yourselves on having a child under the able guidance of the Sisters of Mercy. Many a happy wife in the Territory owes much for the training she received at St. Mary's. The Advocate is under heavy expense, dear friends, and begs you who are in arrears to remit as soon as you can. By passing the Advocate to a friend when you are through with it, you may be the means of getting us a new subscriber. Little strokes fall great oaks. So will it be with us; one new subscriber n...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate Vol. XIV. NOVEMBER, 1902. . No. 1 1 Old Friends, I P BY DAVID BANKS SICKLES. There are no friends like old friends, And none so good and true; We greet them when we meet them, As roses greet the dew; No other friends are dearer, Though born of kindred mold; And while we prize the new ones, We treasure more the old. There are no friends like old friends, Where'er we dwell or roam, r In lands beyond the ocean, Or near the bounds of home; And when they smile to gladden, Or sometimes frown to guide, We fondly wish those old friends Were always by our side. There are no friends like old friends, To help us with the load That all must bear who journey O'er life's uneven road; And when unconquered sorrows The weary hours invest, . The kindly words of old friends Are always found the best. There are no friends like old friends, To calm' our frequent fears, When shadows fall and deepen Through life's declining years; And when our faltering footsteps Approach the Great Div...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

322 The Indian Advocate. j p 5 A Plea for the Indian, 6 MM IGNIFICANT tokens of the Indian Renaissance in America are the facts that Buffalo's fqir grounds oore a statue commemorating me me 01 Chief Red Jacket, and that at St. Louis next year there will be a monument to Osceola, the noble young Seminole chief who led his people in battle against the United States. Children have wept over Seton Thompson's story of the wolf Lobo and his despairing search for his lost mate. Will they withhold tears when they look at that statue and some one tells them the anguish ing story of Osceola's outraged feelings and young life ruined? Will their elders see history in a new light when they talk about this chivalrous red man who would not make war on women and children even after his young wife, Morning Dew, had been stolen away by the American soldiers? These are but a few instances taken from the chronicled past. In the present we have President Diaz, of Mexico, and Congressman Curtis, of India...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

The Indian Advocate. 323 occasional beef rations, salt pork, potatoes and heavy wheaten bread; outdoor life hardened their bodies against the winter's cold, the log houses of the East and Northern and Western tepees of skin, set in the warm heart of the forest, were as comfortable as many of their log houses now and assuredly better ventilated. Their summers spent on the blue waters, in sunny clearances or in the green depths of the forest, were long, halcyon days that even we might envy. In their home life they were, as now, tolerant, gravely ten der, silent, or delightfully humorous by turns. They were a spiritual-minded race that peopled the forest, with spirits owing allegiance to the beneficent Great Spirit or to the Evil One. And what are the Indians to-day? What have we done with our guardianship? They are more or less a broken-spirited race, shy and proud, penned here and there within fixed lim its on the reservation that our fathers' humanity and, yes, their greed and fear,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1902

324 The Indian Advocate. imitative Indian woman has seen something of her white sis ters' homes, her house reflects in a marked degree the appoint ments of the others. Morover, intermarriage within the tribes of each agency, poor food and clothing, the change from an active to a sedentary life and carelessness of exposure which they are no longer fitted to resist are all influences at work to weaken their race and leave them victims to the white plague, tuberculosis. Then what have we done for the Indian, and when have we made proper effort to aid him in the reconstruction of his life within the narrow limits fixed for him? Always excepting the small company of brave missionaries and some devoted teachers and officials, I would say our race has done scarcely anything that it should have done. We have little to be proud of in our own or in our ancestors' dealings with the Indians and much to regret. We gave them Christianity, it is true, and Canada was early consecrated by the unself...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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