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Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,011 items from Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER Editorial tPage . AVAR. Nearly twenty-seven centuries have elapsed since the voice of a divinely in spired prophet was heard proclaiming, "Men shall beat their swords into plow shares and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift sword against nation, neither shall war be longer learned." That voice has been drowned in the red deluge of centuries and that prophecy remains unfulfilled. The desolation and destruction on the soil of classic Greece, the homage of a subject world for Alexander, the shak ing of Europe from center to circum ference can bear testimony to ' man's inhumanity to man.'' The lowly Naza rine came and preached ''Peace on earth, good will toward men ;" but he was given a crown thorns, was nailed to a cross, and turmoil has never ceased. Despite increased intellectual power and refinement, despite the long con tinned efforts of Christianity to remould him the germ of strife planted in man by so many generatio...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

3 EASTERN EPART WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER. OREGON'S GREATEST D MENT STORE Up Against Bargains 3)0(0 Note the few suggestions w footwear and make your selec e make regarding !easoiiablc tions earlv. Mens Russia Calf, Lace, Vesting top new coin toe 5.00 g3 50(0 o)oa 0)0(0 Ladies Vici Kid, lace, in chocolate or Black $2.50 to $4.00 opera V J & TIPTOE. TIPTOE. COMMON StSjga Ladies Kid Oxfords in Tan or Ox Blood, needle or coin toe $1.50 to J4.00 Childs Kid foxed, Vesting top, lace. A good wearing as well as dress shoe. Sizes 5 to 8 $u$0 Sizes 8 to 1 1 75 NSV 0)0(0 Misses Vesting top, lace, Tan Vici Kid, foxed, sizes n to 2 $2.50 Misses Kangaroo calf, lace or button. Good, hon est school shoe, 11 14 to 2 l.Rb to -.2o The Printer Said ... He would put this Ad. right under the marriage notices so that the ladies would all be sure to see it, but if he doesn't we hope they'll see it just the same. U J You don't go it blind when you walk into our store for groceries. Th...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DAI.I-ES TIMES-MOU'JTAIXEEIi V Flax Culture In Oregon. The subject assigned to me is an in teresting and important factor in the industrial activities and c unmerce of the world. I do not feel that I am capa able of doing it justice, but I say with confidence, that the cultivation of flax, and its manufacture, should command the considerate attention of our business people. We know that fiax can be grown in our state with more than ordinary success, and be made a profitable in vestment. Our climate and soil present advantages and conditions for its culture that no other country can excel, and we should avail ourselves of them to make it a leading industry. I do not believe any other business interest, taken as a whole, affords so many opportunities for the employment of labor at remuner ative wages, and especially the labor of women. We all agree that the best form of philanthropy is to aid people to help themselves. We have the best country on earth for people t...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER Contributed Articles . . . speak to tin: s i:ton. (First Whisper OM Lady.) "The rliurch is, exceedingly cold today I hope vou're. not chilled my poor Mrs. Grey? When" I hring a friend with me. its al ways the way ! I must speak to the sexton about it" (Second Whisper Young Lady.) "How frightfully hot the church is, mama ! Just see how dejectt-H my wretched bangs are. There's not a curl left! We must ask papa. To speak to the Sexton about it." (Third Whisper Hheumatic Old -Man.) "A current of air strikes my neck, sit ting here, The church isn't cold, but draughty my dear, There's quite too much air, for this time of year, I'll speak to the Sexton about it." (Fourth Whisper Healthy Young Man) "I say Dick ! This place is atrociously , close ! If they don't open something, we'll have to vamose If I catch the Sexton, I'll give him a dose He ought to be "blown up about it!" Service ended, the malcontents made their threats good, While, respectf...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER ..Our Public Schools.. The first schools of the village Wasco pum were those of the missionaries, ami the private schools maintained by the soldiers, stationed in the village to de fend the white settlers against the Indians. In the spring of 1834 the first school of the post, a small log building, was erected a little south-west of the place where the Academy Park school now stands. In the summer of 75, Chas. Meigs taught a private school in the same buiding, but he left the school in the fall to join a company of volun teers organized by Nathan Olney to fitrht the Indians. One of the early schools was taught by Miss Scounee, a sister of Mrs. Put Brad ford, and in later years the wife of Col onel Ebie. This school wa taught in a private house on Fourth street between Court and Union. In November, 1859, the school district was organized, and this foundation of the public schools of The Dalles was strengthened by build ing a public school ...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER Contributed Articles Picturesque Hood River. CUBA, PASTAXI) PRESENT. When we consider that in the begin ing of the present century Spain owned vast tosessions on the western conti nent, both in North and South America, and that she has left to her now nothing but the island of Cuba, and that in a most miserable and pitiable condition, it behooves us to inquire what has brought about her losses and what has devastated Cuba? We will get the answer that always conies when one country holds another in subjection. Where the strong dominates the weak, until life becomes a burden rather than a blessing, revolt is inevitable. Spain of all powers, claiming to be civilized, must have been most incapable of gov erning her possessions. Not only has she been hard, tyrranical and cruel, but. most perverse and shortsighted, and ' hrough all her losses, has not learned one lesson in justice,toleration, or policy. Her officers sent to govern Cuba were arm...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MO UXTAIXEEU. Women in Medicine The first woman to obtain the legree of M. D. in our country was Elizabeth IWackwell.She wasborn in rhiglanTL" but came to this country when a child. In 1S43 she first resolved to become a physician, and as a foundation on which to build, she studied and became profi cient in Greek, Latin and the sciences. In 1845 she began reading medicine with Dr. John Dickson, of North Carolina and attended a regular course of lectures in Geneva, N. V , and graduated there with great honors in 1849. We. in this day and age, can hardly realize what it was for a woman to undertake such a thintr as a medical education at that time. There existed an almost unsur mountable prejudice against women tak ing up this line of study, but undaunted through trials and tribulations, this brave woman never waveied, and soon after, her sister, KmilyBlack well, entered the profession and was eminent in the good work, a successful practitioner, be sid...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER. 0 j Spirit of the Cascades . . . One autumn, many years ago, eastern Now, today dark is liable to catch you Oregon seemed to have gathered all her in the middle o' the lava an' then you're forces of storm and flood into peaceful- as good as buried." THIS SEASON ness. Each day the sky rose blue and distant above the bare hills and sage brush plain. The hills bore no majestic trees to make petty the distance from The white light of the snow- intensi fied the strong lines of the men's faces ; but falling upon the woman in the door wav revealed onlv marks of care and earth to heaven, and men had not yet hardship. A little in front stood the cared or were not able to erect lofty mail-carrier, just bending to fasten his buildings to break the brown monotony snowshoes. With a last lift and shake of the valleys. While th' clouds seemed 0f each to prove security, he turned to to have forgotten that their duty was to answer his friends' warnings. ...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

io WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MO U1JTAINEER CHILDREN'S PAGE EDITED BY MISS CAROLYN W. KETCHUJ1. WILLIE'S TEA PARTY. 'Tis Willie's birthday and you nee Three little boys come in to tea; But oh ! how very sad to tell, They have not been behaving well. The little boy whose name was Ned, He wanted jelly on his bread. The little boy whose name was Sam, He vowed he would have damson jam. The little bov whose name was Phil, Said, "I'll have honey! Yes, I will!" But ' The little boy whose name was Paul, While they were quarrelling, ate it all. Old Aunt Susan's May-Basket. Margaret, and Mildred were sitting on the floor of the sewing-roonij in the midst of heaps of fluffy tarletan, with berry boxes and paste-board boxes of all sizes and sorts scattered about in hope less confusion. "Mamma, let's hang a May-basket for old Aunt Susan," said Mildred. "Oh, yes, Milly, a green one with cow slips in it," eagerly cried Meg, ever ready to help and always thinking up some one's 'preferences. No...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER. 11 -after more afraid of cows than before. There I I hear the dinner bell." "Oh, Auntie, won't you tell us more about Joe and Sue after dinner," clam ored the children, all three. t "The very next rainy Saturday," said Auntie Maude, "I'll tell you about the shearing and the 'River Ranch," and the little, motherless calf that Sue found on the prairie ;" said Auntie Maude. Do you suppose it ever rained again on Saturday afternoon? C. W. K AN OPEN SECRET. Good Biddy Top Knot made a nest. And hid it very nicely ; ' But cackling when she laid the egg, Revealed the place precisely. Sel. A Story About a Parrot. doors all night he will be chilled and catch his death of cold." It was getting most night, and Mr. Q. was down at the barn milking the cow. Pretty soon he started toward the house and called out to Miss Q., "Mar tha, I heard the parrot call out, 'grand ma !' while I was milking, but I eouj not tell where he was." Miss Q. was so d.3Ugfct...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

12 WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAIXEEK Contributed jirtcies THE WOMAN'.' She looked from her tower window, yThe day had died in the west, And the tender shadows of twilight -Purpled the sea's, warm breast. And the mystery and the splendor That darkened the bending skies, '- Was tragir with life's deep meaning "When reflected in her eyes. And she felt the world's heart beating, And surging against her own The pitiful, cry of the children, The mother's" pleading moan. ; The groans of the sick and sinning. Through the recurring : years, She heard with a: passionate pity, With grief too great for tears. And her sonlgrew faint with sorrow For the toiling sons of men, Who are born to want and misery, AVho die and die again. ; Held by the forca of her yearning, ' All motionless si :ent" there. The full tide of her being swept up, White-flamed, to God, in prayer. Mother-heart of the human world, ' That has ached since timers first dawn, ' Sensing the-fault and fall of the race The ...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TMES-MOUN TAINEER Contributed jtfrticlej . Continued from page 12, on toward the river. It was realh of no to ise jiK'ii.v where she went; walking was a splendid exercise and she would walk. The afternoon was charming. Suddenly the Dutiful Daughter paused and looked around: then realized, with a start, where she was. Unconsciously she had come directly to Their Place. This was disconcerting. She had not intended to seek this spot, delightful though it was, in the cool shade; cer tainly not. She would retrace her steps '.immediately that is, as soon had rested a little. It is tiresome to walk even a short distance on a warm day. A great oak threw its shade invitingly near and she sat down on one of the pro truding roots . and leaned her' head against its "broad trunk. Then she thought thought of the beauty of the scenery in general and this one spot in particular. It was indeed an ideal re treat, though why they called it Their Place was hard to tell. Perha...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

& 14 WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER v 41- 0. R. N. The Oregon Railroad & Navigation Co Do You Know That you can get a 10-day round trip excursion ticket The Dalles to Portland via the O. R. A N. Co. for $4.50. .... That the loss of two days required to make the round trip on the river costs you more than that, ;:nd when you pay your necessary expenses and your fare, you are "out and iujured."- ..... Are you going "down the valley" orio Eastern Washington, then take the O.R.&N. through between Portland and your destination and save a day or two in time and expenses. Through Tickets . . TO ALL POINTS EAST are on sale at The Dalles. Personally conducted Weekly Excursions to' the 'East in modern upholstered tourist sleepers leave The Dalles on train No. 2 at 11.45 P. M Mondays to Kansas City, Chicago and Boston via Salt Lake, Mo. Pacific Railwav and Chicago & Alton Railway. .... Tuesdays to St. Joe, Kansas City and St. Louis, via Salt Lake and C. R. I. &...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER 15 Incidents in the Life of Missionary Spalding. still alive she cast about in her mind how she might warn him. Among the Indians w ho held them in Much has been -wild and written on She told me how her father had Ptivity, she felt sure that she might the Whitman massacre, of the killed brought her down to Waulatpu and left trust OJie- Watching her chance she and of the survivors : but few know the her to go to school, which begun that she said to him, "Go tell my father not story of the escape of th Ueverend H, fatal morning, November 2th, 1847. come here, for the Indians are wait II. Smuldhi from -nam death during Some davs before. Mr. Snaiildin !Vrf mg to kill him." Her intimation proved t r o l At e it -r i aaI And a still smaller number Dr. Whitman '-ad gone over on the irue' anu inenuiy xnaian staneu over the trail to Umatilla, and met that time. gone over on the know that his life was saved bv his ten- Umatilla, visitinsr amonc the...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

IG WOMAN'S EDITION THE , DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER Coniributed Articles Continued from page !.r. ticulatmg that he had come a long way but did not tell his name. He ventured to ask what the excitement was. She T-pnlifd that t.hp f!nvnsps had broken out and murdered the Whitmans and that Spalding's family had been taken for safe keeping to Craigg's Mt. and that they were making preparations to defend: their Mission. Spalding then told the woman that he was Spalding timself. She ran back crying, "Spald ing! Spalding!" He made his way to Levi's tent and this Indian took him in his armsind said, "my dear friend, I and my people will always be your friends." The woman's cries soon raised the entire Mission and the expressions of joy that Spalding had been spared to them alive, mingled with the moans and groans, lamentations, wails and sobs aided to the. confusion of tongues was a babel indeed. The men bound up his burned feet, while the women prepared nourishing broth which was fed to him...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER 1 319 a pioneer in the same undertaking1, daking homes and raising fruit on dry uphill lands. The spring of J872 saw the first trees planted on top of a hill by Mr. Roberts. Ic afterwards) proyed the orchard most secure against frosts. Bearing peaches one . year when the entire peach croD grown -elsewhere in the region was destroyed by frost. As is the case when men try something before conside-ed imprac ticable, these men were the butt of many a jest and sarcasm. H. J. Wal iron, a prominent citizen of The Dalles, said: ''Roberts, I will have a large bust cast of you for your grand--children, if you succeed in making a living on that dry land." Not only were trees planted on top of the hill, but corn, potatoes and watermelons, also This was going farther than -any one had dared to think; for " water melons must be irrigated." These were the fore-runners of the -carloads that have since been shipped from this locality. Side by side with th...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

18 WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER j Plain Statement OF The Republican Party Asks the Support of the Voters in the Coming Election And Tells Why Tt Expects to Receive this Support Sound Money, Protection and the Carrying to a Successful Termination of the War with Cuba are its Car dinal Principles A few Words about the Candidates. THE TICKET. STATE. For Governor, T. T. GEER.J of Marion County. For Secretary of State, F. L. DUNBAR, of Clatsop County, For State Treasurer, CHARLES S. MOORE, of Klamath County. For State Printer, W. H. LEEDS, of Jackson County. For Attorney-General, D. R. N. BLACKBURN, of Linn County. For Supreme Sudge, F. A. MOORE, of Columbia County. For Superintendent Public Instruction, J. H. ACKERMAN, of Multnomah County. DISTRICT. For Congressman, Second District, MALCOLM A. MOODY, of Wasco County. For Circuit Judge, Seventh District, H. S. WILSON, of Wasco County. For Prosecuting Attorney, Seventh District, A. A. JAYNE. of Wasco County. For Member Sta...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER. 19 Oregon Congress of Women BY ABIGAIL SCOTT DUNIWAY. The equal suffrage movement, having be a logical method for women to pur passed from the tentative stage of its sue in dealing with intemperance the drew near and crouched at hi9 mountains and forests bowed to his will, even the terrible rage of the Furies was calmed by his entrancing During the time of the Athenian as tones which gained him free admit- cendancy, Pisistratus, the tyrant, regu- Ia Orpheus was personified that male choruses and the flute, also the encouraged that ennobled and exalted charming power of music which noth- Sydian scale was imported from the the mind. The use of instruments of mg could resist. The wild beasts east. These were pleasing to the people manv strings was discouraged. Ther - ,1 feet, but were condemned by the teachers opposed the use of the flute and other and philosophers, as enervating and ef- music at their dinners, saying that it feminate. grea...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

20 WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER Women's Societies EDITED BY MRS. A few 3'ears ago, organizations com posed of and controlled by women were almost a wonder of the age, but today woman stands on an equal platform with man in societies of any kind, be they secret or otherwise. It is said : "Wives cannot keep a secret. Just the moment that they hear A piece of news they breathe it in their lord and master's ear. But husbands are not so, because they have within their lives, Lots and lots of things they never tell their wives." When we take iftto consideration the number of societies now existing in a town the size of our own "queen of the Inland Empire," we can justly say that much of their success is due to woman and her influence, and man is beginning to reluctantly admit that woman is his equal if not superior in her respective station in life. Her influence permeates society, as the fragrant rose distills its sweetness o'er the earth. In preparing sketches of the dif...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Dalles times-mountaineer. — 17 May 1898

WOMAN'S EDITION THE DALLES TIMES-MOUNTAINEER. 21 i Flower Culture EDITED BY MRS. S. BROOKS and MRS. GOURLAY. shower a plant and allow the sunshine The purchase price is $2.50 per acre, on it while Mater stands on the leaves, payable one-third down, one-third in If you do, more than likely, brown spots one year, and the other third two years will appear, making the foliage look as from drte of application, these two pay if blistered, which, in fact, it is. A drop ments to be secured by promissory notes of water often focuses the rays of the at 10 per cent., which is payable semi- sun upon the plant and is sure to scorch it. As T sat in our flower decked church, beautiful varieties now grown, one can on this beautiful Easter day of April have a great display of flowers from tenth, eighteen hundred and ninety- them. Where one is not provided with eight, amid the floral offerings brought a window for wintering them, and yet from our homes and gardens, to deck would like them for bedding...

Publication Title: Dalles Times-Mountaineer, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oregon, United States
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