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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The “Drys” of Bombay. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

The “Drys” of Bombay. Mohammedans in Bombay have started an anti-drinking campaign to “reform” their co-religlonists. They are picketing the liquor shops and the Moslems coming out have their faces blackened and are marched through the streets. One man found drunk was decked with a “garland” of old shoos and was taken round the city by an escort beating empty oil tins.— London Mail.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Corrugated Cardboard for Insulators. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

Corrugated Cardboard for Insulators. Corrugated cardboard of the kind used for packing cases can be used for Insulating buildings against the cold, such insulation being particularly de. sirable in barns and poultry houses. The boxes are opened along the joints and flattened out, the material being applied with short nails and tin washers, such as used for the application of roofing paper.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
ANCIENT TALE OF CREATION According to the Chippewa Legend, Menaboshu Was the Originator of All Things. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

ANCIENT TALE OF CREATION According to the Chippewa Legend, Menaboshu Was the Originator of All Things. According to the legend of the Chippewa Indians, Menaboshu was the creator of all things. He avowed one day that he would make the earth. He rounded the soil between his powerful hands until it grew into a great ball. Then Menaboshu mixed water with the soil to form mud, and besides. molded it about a great rock, when, behold —a still larger ball, says Gershom Crane in the Boston Transcript. Menaboshu then undertook to devise the living things which dwell on the earth. The first bear escaped from its maker, leaped to the earth and bounded straightaway across the North American continent. But the land where the sprawling bear’s huge paws struck the earth was still so fresh and soft that they left deep tracks. These deep marks quickly filled with water. Scarcely had the frightened bear bounded away when the beautiful lakes—Superior, Michigan, Huron, Ontario and Erie —appeared, full t...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
BEAUTY DESCRIBED BY POET Word Painting of Sunset on the Arno Brings the Scene Vividly to the Mind. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

BEAUTY DESCRIBED BY POET Word Painting of Sunset on the Arno Brings the Scene Vividly to the Mind. It was sunset on the Arno; far down the river, over mountain ranges where snow yet lingered, a warm tint, half rose and half amethyst, gleamed along the horizon; beside the low parapet that bordered the street, people were loitering back from their afternoon promenade at the Casino; here a soldier, now an Englishman on horseback, and then a bearded artist; sometimes an oval-faced contadina, the broad brim of whose finely woven straw hat flapped over eyes of mellow jet; and again a trig nurse with Saxon ringlets, dragging a petulant urchin along; and over all these groups and figures was shed the beautiful smile of parting day, and by them, under graceful bridges, flowed the turbid stream, the volume doubled by the spring freshets. I surveyed the panorama from an overhanging balcony, where I stood awaiting the appearance of a friend upon whom I had called. — Henry T. Tuckerman.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Most Ancient Weapon. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

Most Ancient Weapon. Back In the dim reaches of prehistoric ages, no one packed a sword unless it was the saber-toothed tiger. But soon, primitive man began to evolve his crude cleavers out of every sort of material, from the jawbone with which Samson fanned the Philistines to the shining steel with which the Assyrians cracked down, “like a wolf on the fold.” Some very serviceable slashers were swung by the Greeks after they had exhausted their ammunition, which consisted of spears. One of their favorite modes of combat was to mount their chariots and dash by one another, chucking javelins. In the event no bull’s eyes were made, they would leap to the ground and draw their swords, the survivor, as in the case of the procedure of Achilles with Hector, making fast the body of the vanquished to the rear of bis chariot and ordering the charioteer in a clear, commanding voice, “Home, Jameus.”

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Reading Versus Thinking. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

Reading Versus Thinking. It is good to road, mark, learn — but it is better to inwardly digest. It is good to read, better to think —better to think one hour than to read ten hours without thinking. Thinking is to reading (if the hook read have anything in it) what rain and sunshine are to the seed cast into the ground the influence which maketh it bear and bring forth, thirty, forty, an hundredfold. To read is to gather into the barn or storehouse of the mind; to think Is to cast seed corn into the ground to make it productive. To read is to collect information; to think is to. evolve power. To read is to lay a burden on the back; but to think is to give to the feet swiftness, and the hands strength. Yet we have a thousand or ten thousand readers for one thinker, as the kind of books sought after iu circulating libraries bears witness.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
The Razor in History. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

The Razor in History. The next time your razor slips remember that it was Scipio Africanus, the great Roman, who was the first to institute the custom of shaving daily. Which observation brings us to the subject of shaves and beards in general. Who took the first shave? Nobody knows. The answer to the question, who wore the first heard? is more simple. Adam, of course. Something Is known of the heard of Belshazzar, the ancient monarch who “made a great feast to 1000 lords.” Belshazzar used a curling iron and has frequently been pictured with a beard full of curls. To users of henna powder it ought to be a comfort to know this monarch used gold pevder on his beard.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
VIRGINIA NEWS 111 SM OBOEB Latest Doings in Various Farts of the State TOLD IN SNORT PARAGRAPHS [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

VIRGINIA NEWS 111 SM OBOEB Latest Doings in Various Farts of the State TOLD IN SNORT PARAGRAPHS Petersburg.—While playing in a sandbank, Roland L. Pitt . ■; i. Jr., L*-year-old son o. I:. L. iMt.n-.ia, w.; buried alive at ti o'clock and was <le.it from sulT oca lion when dug out a halthour later by his faimer and neighbors. Three years ago another young boy met his death in the same way. Harrisonburg.—The historical pageant, presented by almost 1,000 pupils of the Harrisonburg City Schools, was given on the Normal School campus, under the direction ot the physical culture department of the Normal School. The pioneer history of the Shenandoah Valley was the motif, six successive stages of settlement being depicted. Harrisonburg,—To stimulate interest in better stock raising methods among the members of the boys and girls agricultural clubs of the county, a Harrisonburg bank has promised to display the first and second prize pigs lu the lobby of its bank this fall. Thlrty-f...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
STATE CAPITAL [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

STATE CAPITAL Schools And Recreation Are Rural ! Needs. * Adoption of a resolution making the. uganization a permanent one, and an ■ddress by Henry C. Wallace, Secreary of Agriculture, were outstanding natures a: the closing session of the two-day meeting of delegates from ali parts of Virginia, who attended the Rural L'fe Conference called by Govnor Davis. Secretary Wallace do- ; bared that the future of the country: pends mainly on upkeep of the farming industry. “The country life movement,’’ he declared, ‘’began in the cities and towns when prices of foodstuffs .vent up and various farm commodities began to become scarce. It was realized by ie. c :idents of large communities that union something was done to foster rural life, the country soon would become dependent on other nay lions for its foodstuffs, at the same lime having to pay exorbitant prices for a lower quality.” Salvation Army Summer Camp. If the Salvation Army is able to obtain permission from the War Department to mo...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921
Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

HIGHLAND COUNTY DIRECTORY. County and District Officers: Henry W. Holt, Judge of Circuit Court, Staunton, Va. Terms of Court—4 th Tuesday in April, 2d Tuesday July, 2d Tuesday October, Andrew L. Jones, Commonwealth Attorney, Monterey, Ya. W. H. Matheny, Clerk, Monterey, Va. W. N. Bird, Sheriff, Monterey, Va, H. M. Slaven, Treasurer, Monterey, Va. J. W. E. Lockridge, Commissioner of Revenue, Monterey, Va. IjkL. Beverage, Co. Surveyor, Monteyrey, Va. ««■ • waiter Muilsnax, Supt. of I’oor, Crab bottom, Va. it. E. Mauzy, Supt. of Schools, Hightown, Va. John M. Colaw, Oomniissioner of accounts, Monterey, Va. Blue Grass District J. W. Hevener, Supervisor (Chrm.) Hightown, Va. ee J. Wimer, Overseer of Poor, Crabbottom, Va. Ben H. Colaw, Constable, Crabbottom Va. D. O. Bird, Justice, Valley Center,Va. E. D. Swecker, Justice, Monterey,Rtl M. K. Simmons, Justice, Crabbottom, Monterey District. A. J. Terry, Supervisor, Trimble, Va, Arthur Ilevener, Overseer of Poor, Monterey, Va. J. H. Samples...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

The Thrice-a-Week Edition of The New York World IN 1919 and 1920 Prrcically a daily at the price of a weekly. No other newspaper in the world gives so much at so low a price The forces are already lining up for ihe Presidental campaign of 19 20. The Thrice-a-Week World which is the greatest example of tabloid Journalism in America will give you all the news of it. It will keep you as thoroughly informed as a daily al i five or six times the price. Besides. \ ibe news from Europe for a long j iime to come will be of overwhelming uP-rast, and we are deeply and j \U2ii> e-mevrned in it. The Thrice | a-Week World will furnish you j accurate and comprehensive repor. everything that happens. The Thrice-A-Week World’s regui lar subscription price is only Sl.eO per year, and this pays for 156 pa- | pers. We offer this unequalled i newspaper and The HIGHLAND E.E- -! CORDER together for one year for $2.35. AFTER THE ACCIDENT To Your Watch or Jewelry SToa’ll need that article replac...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

DENTAL NOTICE Dr. Charles S. Kramer, Dentist Marlinton, - - W. Va. I am prepared to do all kinds of dental work at prices consistent with cost of materials and high class efficient work. All work guaranteed.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

The Staunton Chamber of Comm erce, at ameeting held last week. took up a matter in which Highland is vi tally interested, nimely, the six-mile section of road at West Augusta now being graded. Due to the fact that the state High way Commissioner has received nothing but excessive and exhodbitant bids tor the stone work or capping of this section, the prospect of having nothing better than a muddy grade for traffic next winter confronts the two sections, and the Staunton body passed a resolution urging the State authorities to prevent such calamity if possible. It goes without saying that the Stauntonians had shiefly in mind personal interests, but in looking after their own interests they incidentally put in a plea for Highland, and their action also amounts to a icc .ignition of this countys claim as a v,u liable fee del aim commercial adjunct A recognition of inter dependence or interests in common, would result in a sort of team work or unity of action helpful to both sections. H...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
WHAT MORE IMPORTANT [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

WHAT MORE IMPORTANT There are many matters engaging the attention of our people at this time, but not nearly so many as a few years ago. We cannot live in the past; our lives are made up of the present. The great qusetion with each of us is, “What is my duty today?” Or, perhaps more accurately expressed, “What is my opportunity today?” y : '-t Mr. Geo. . Creene, -well known « Tor < i thy Clifton Forge Review, two years ego undertook successfully the very important matter of help ing to save the hundreds of needy homeless < unfortunate little children not in India. China or Japan, but wiihin the bounds-of this Commonwealth. Many of us will recall the sue cess attending his efforts, as a result of the responsiveness on the part of the people of our County. Mr. Greene, at the earnest solicita tion of the Children’s Home Society of Virginia, lias again agreed to bring this matter before the people. He feels confident that the people are not only as equally interest...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Germans Want Liquor Law [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

Germans Want Liquor Law (By The Associated Press) Berlin, May 22—An interpellation addressed to the government by the Bourgeois parties in the Reiphstag, declares there is too much drinking of alcoholic stimulents in Berlin and other cities and charges that the growth in the number of bars is favoring inebriety to an alarming extent, the government is asked in the interpellation when it proposes to present the long awaited draft of a law for combatting drunk eness.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
French Bonds To be Offered for Sale [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

French Bonds To be Offered for Sale (By The Associated Press) New York, May 22 —J. P. Morgan & Company to day announced that the French government has authorized its issue in the United States $1000,000,000 of French twenty-year external loan 7J per cent bonds. The loan is to bo underwritten by a syndicate there being formed by the Morgan firm. The bonds will be offered at 95 and interest, yielding slightly over 8 per cent. o The fellow who asserts that he nev er saw so many stacks of old hay Jr ft over, predict, as a matter if course that they will be needed [winter.” Oh, ye of little faith.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
WHERE TO BOOST YOUR OWN PRODUCTS [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

WHERE TO BOOST YOUR OWN PRODUCTS In a country town, In a farmer’s cooperative store. In the heart of a dairy community, In what is perhaps the nation’s I n what is perhaps the nations greatest dairy state, a product is being advertised and sold in large quail titles that is helping to keep down the prices of dairy cattle, milk and other dairy products. This product is “oleomargarine”, the farmer is said to be the best customer. Unfortunately, this condition is not limited to one town but is common to the entire state. Dairymen should get back to as a food. their own product. It is no substitute Produce clean milk, U o more milk. Use butter and cheese freely. Fight filled milk. P'eed more milk on the farm. In this state, farmers, townsmen, city men—everybody— should boost the products of cur farmers. When the farm products cf a state are in good demand and bring a good but reasonable price, that whole is prosperous, you among the rest.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
INTERESTING STATISTICS [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

INTERESTING STATISTICS The following ligures taken from a recent report sent out by the State auditor are of interest to Highlanders As to live stock, tlie statement shows that the county lias 1,901 horses and mules, valued at $33,210 and assessed at $43.77 Cattle 10,108, value 239,243, and assessed at $23.67 per head; sheep, 17,210, value $87,277, assessed $5.07; hogs 3,956, value $10,898, assessed $2.75. Vehicles—other than motor—l,065, value $14,288, average assessment $13.42. Automobiles, motor truck etc., 254, value $49,925, average assessment $196.56. The value of her farming implements is $15,105. There are 787 watches, valued at $1,838, with 892 clocks valued at $1,548. We have 359 musical instruments, valued at 8,405, while household and kitchen furniture is valued at $32,- t 848.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Commissioner’s Sale of House and Lot [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 27 May 1921

Commissioner’s Sale of House and Lot By virtue of authority vested in us by a decree of the Corcuit Court of Highland County entered at the last April term thereof in the chancery cause therein pending styled W. C. Evick et als vs Mary B. Evick et als, we will, on Saturday the 25 day of June 1921 at the front door of the court house ofHighland Cunty offer for sale at public auction, subject tol the right of Mary B. Evick, widow of Dice Evick, deceased, to live in and use th same during her life time a certain lot of land with dwelling house and out buildings thereon situated in the village of McDowell belonging to the estate of Dice Evick, deceased upon the following terms: enough cash on the day of sale to pay the costs of suit and sale and balance to be paid in two equal payments for which purchaser will be required to execute his bonds dated on the day of sale, waiving the homestead, bearing interest from date with personal security to be approved by the commis sioners and fallin...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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