ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Farm Bureau News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,070 results
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

June 1997 I /| \ m |p rn H fl ■ Buy a new Dodge Truck and pick up a ton of cash. Up To $500 Cash Back To Farm Bureau Members. extra $300 to $500 in the deal. $500 cash back on '96 and '97 Ram Vans and As a member, you qualify for $300 back on Ram Wagons. That's on top of any other all new 1996 and 1997 5.9 L V-8 Magnum Ram national Dodge cash back offers All you need E 1500 pickups. to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm $500 back on '96 Bureau validating that you've been a member and '97 Ram for at least thirty days. Then stop by your 2500 and 3500 Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to pickups with a be in the Farm Bureau. 5.9 L V-8, tThis cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, is scheduled . . 1 to expire 9/30/97, and is subject to change. It may not be used in combination with any Cummins Diesel other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or certain other special programs. Ask for restrictions and details. Farm Bureau" is a regi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Farm Bureau News Buffers help farmers and environment RICHMOND—A new effort to encourage farmers to set buffer strips between their fields and streams is off to a slow but encouraging start in Virginia. As of May 2, 17 Virginia landowners had signed up to put 131.4 acres worth of narrow strips of land beside waterways into the Conservation Reserve Program. Farmers are being urged to plant buffers under a $1 million National Conservation Buffer Initiative announced in April. "This is something that we've really been concentrating on over the past few years," said Don Davis, Virginia administrator of the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. "It enhances water quality and stops erosion into our streams," he said. "We're talking about long, narrow strips of land. We're not talking about a large acreage that would have to be put into a buffer strip for any producer, even if he had a lot of streambanks to protect." This is a win-win deal for farmers in Virginia, Davi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

June 1997 Average crop loss from deer is $8,000 (Continued from page 1) ferences of attitudes toward animals," Parkhurst said. "There's a growing trend of an animal rights attitude, or at least we hear more about this in the media now. This is not necessarily contributing to the deer problem." Like in other states, many of Virginia's 240,000 deer hunters are growing old. Some have quit the sport and too few younger hunters are replacing them, Parkhurst noted. Some farmers draw up contracts with hunt clubs to allow hunters to shoot deer on their farms. In many cases, this results in less deer damage to crops. These are deer management and deer damage control programs and the game department administers them. "Some hunt clubs don't cull heavy enough to keep damage down and make it meaningful to farmers," Parkhurst said. "Some hunt clubs always like to keep some deer around for the members to shoot." However, Parkhurst recalled one of Virginia's "worst cases" of deer infestation. A Fai...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Farm Bureau News Teen-ager turns to father for working kidney Farm Bureau leader gives son new life By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor CHARLOTTESVILLE-—Nine-teen-year-old Aaron Saufley has a great life ahead of him. He's engaged to get married and he's in college to become a minister. However, he recently encountered one major problem: After 19 years, his kidneys have stopped working. At just 14 months of age, Aaron developed hemolytic uremic syndrome. This is a condition in which I ... • . I* J I damage occurs in the kidneys when a "net" forms over the pelvis of the kidneys and they can't filter the body's toxins from the blood. Over the years, his kidneys have been slowing down. Doctors said he would need a kidney transplant or else he would have to spend hours each week hooked up to a dialysis machine. Stephen Saufley, a member of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation board of directors, didn't want his son to go on a dialysis machine or a national waiting list for a kidney. So...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

June 1997 Improving horse diet is focus of researchers Editor's Note: This is the fourth in a continuing series about Virginia's 12 agricultural research and Extension centers. By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist MIDDLEBURG—The saying, "You are what you eat," applies to horses as well as humans. That's why at the Middleburg Agricultural Research & Extension Center, research focuses on what horses eat and the nutrients they derive from their food. "We need to find out what horses are eating to get the maximum benefit out of what they're being fed," said Janice Holland, a Virginia Tech doctoral student. She conducts research at the center. Horses are prone to certain diseases, such as developmental orthopedic disease, which can be linked to nutritional imbalances. When a horse has developmental orthopedic disease, the animal's cartilage and soft tissue grow faster than the bones. Thus, the skeleton can't support the horse's weight, Ms. Holland explained. This cau...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Farm Bureau News Ag education classes coming under fire (Continued from page 8) ag classes has increased by about 1,000 to 2,000 each year for the past five years. Enrollment in Virginia's ag classes stands at 30,000 and encompasses 220 middle schools and high schools, said Dr. John Hillison, director of agricultural education at Virginia Tech. He's involved with keeping the state's 300 ag teachers trained. Through hands-on activities and projects, students learn welding, electrical wiring, carpentry, engine repair, forestry, gardening and recordkeeping. "Ag education provides a practical application of math and science classes," Orrock said. "Students can apply math and science to real-life experiences. "When we do a unit in arc welding, we see a chemical reaction, which would be taught in chemistry," Orrock said. "In woodworking, they get a practical application of biology and earth science." Use of math comes in figuring building material costs. Ag classes help give students a we...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

June 1997 FB seeks your opinion It's policy development time again at Farm Bureau. If you want to help your county Farm Bureau develop policies on issues that will affect you, take a few minutes to fill out this questionnaire. The following questions relate to vital agricultural topics that affect farmers both directly and indirectly. Questionnaires will be used in forming policies that will be voiced in the Virginia General Assembly, Congress and governmental agencies. To make sure your voice is heard, county resolutions committees need members' opinions by June 30. The policy development process begins in July in counties across the state. Check answers where appropriate or write answers on a separate sheet of paper. Mail or take your responses to your county Farm Bureau office by June 30. Ag educ./Research/Extension 1. What are the most critical areas for agricultural research in Virginia? 2. What specific services should be offered by the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service? ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Farm Bureau News Father and son kidney transplant is successful (Continued from page 8) Bible College in Elizabeth City, N.C., asked Aaron, "Shouldn't you be worried?" He told her he wasn't. "The foundation of this whole thing is faith in God," Aaron said. "He made this body. He can fix it. I know it's all going to work out." "Faith is a big part of this," Saufley noted. "We've received word from churches as far away as Washington state that they are praying for us. We have a large number of churches praying for us." Saufley noted that during a conversation weeks before the transplant, the doctor asked him, "You realize you'll have only one kidney?" However, Saufley's research revealed that some people are born with only one kidney. Milk gives needed calcium (Continued from page 9) for granted, you can't do any more," she lamented. Mrs. Morgan wishes she had gotten more calcium when her bones were still forming. "It's a silent disease," she said. "You can look fine and feel fine, bu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

June 1997 (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. > Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) t classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the lOTH of each month preceding the publication month. I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: ( ) ADVERTISEMENT:...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Farm Bureau News Drink juices for improved health Fruits and vegetables are often referred to as perfect foods. They're high in fiber, vitamins and minerals, as well as low in calories, fat, and sodium. They are naturally cholesterol-free. Most of us need to work on boosting our produce intake to the recommended five servings daily to help reduce cancer risk. Fruit and vegetable juices are a convenient way to consume more produce, and they are almost as nutritious as whole fruits and vegetables except that the fiber content is much lower. Some juices are also more nutritious than others. Orange, grapefruit and lemon juices have a full day's worth of vitamin C, along with vitamin B-6, folic acid, potassium, thiamin, magnesium and copper. Prune, tomato and pineapple juices are the next best choices June 9: Forestry and Wildlife Field Day, Reynolds Homestead Forest Resources Research Center, Critz. Contact Richard Kreh, 540-694-4135. June 10: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture brea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

June 1997 Revolutionary "2-in-1" TRIMMER/MOWER""!/ A) Takes the place of both your hand- W I J held trimmer and rotary mower! Ar • The DR® TRIMMER/MOWER™ rolls fW W' "light as a feather" on two BIG WHEELS! ¥ \ • Perfect for ALL • TRIMS far easier, better, mowing and more precisely than hand- Jr JjL trimming MOVV^ever S th smalle^ So, WHY HASSLE J h A e RD f with hand-held trimN(^MONEY DETAILS about the Revolutionary dr trimmer/mower;! "This is the first jand specifications of Manual, Electric-Starting and Profes-sion-1 —— .... S3 Farm Bureau News

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ personalized service can be as close as your own community. «s 4 / f' JJ.<*Y" Broad Range of # jf y OU are unc j er a g e 55 — f or individuals or families * * c Coverage • If y OU are over a g e 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. |H£!IE9 You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! fa™l Drinking milk has multl- Rabies cases In Virginia Farm Burea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

Farm Bureau Volume 56, Number 6 H jH «JH9 : iv#Kv '~M (See Teens, Page 2) News ERIC MILLER/FBN Cattle prices swing up By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—After riding out a low price cycle that began in 1994, cattle producers are now seeing prices soar. Experts believe prices will remain high well into 1998. Some 550-pound steers that sold for 55 cents a pound in the fall of 1996 are now selling for as high as $1 a pound, said Jim Johnson, a fieldman for the Virginia Cattleman's Association. "Cattle prices have almost doubled since last fall," he noted. Replacement heifers, which are used for rebuilding herds, sold for $500 to $600 in the spring of 1996. Now they're going for $700 to $800 and sometimes as high as $848. "What a difference a year makes," Johnson said. "It's pretty incredible. "There's a lot more enthusiasm and more optimism for the cattle Bernie Tate, who raises red Angus cattle, takes a break from cutting hay. It costs $430 to produce a steer that sells f...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

Farm Bureau News feens learn safety pays big bucks (Continued from page 1) The youths are enrolled in Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company's teen-age driver safety program. If they keep their promises and don't have a traffic conviction or atfault accident for three years, they will each receive a $1,000 U.S. Savings Bond. "I think it's a good incentive for them," said Chesterfield County resident Ron Hatcher. His 16-year-old son, Corey, enrolled in the program in December. "It teaches them there are benefits to being careful." The program's coordinator, Darlene Berryman, is hoping other teens realize this and sign up. "The summer months are very critical for teen drivers," Mrs. Berryman said. "So now, more than at any other time, they should sign up to drive safely and responsibly." The teen driver program's intent is to reduce the number of accidents by teen-agers insured with the Farm Bureau, thereby reducing the number of claims filed with the company. "I think it's an ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

July 1997 Blue mold disease threatens Virginia farmers Farmers contend with a seemingly endless number of challenges each growing seasonmarket price fluctuations, catastrophic weather events, a sometimes misinformed public and other problems related to insects and predators. For the past several years, Virginia tobacco growers have dealt with all of the above. But one problem that has recently played havoc with growers of the golden leaf is a fungal disease commonly known as blue mold. The mold attacks young tobacco leaves during times of Yellowstone's hungry bison bring problems to Montana Yellowstone National Park hasn't been a very good neighbor recently to Montana's cattle ranchers. An exploding population of bison within the park, and the lack of forage to nourish the herd, has caught Montana ranchers in the cross hairs of conflicting federal policies pertaining to the migrating herds. The large bison population has eaten the park nearly bare. More than a thousand of the animal...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

Farm Bureau News FB members appointed to ag board RICHMOND—Farm Bureau members will find familiar faces on the Virginia Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Five of the six new board members, and one reappointment are all active Virginia Farm Bureau members. Bennie Etheridge of Accomack County was reappointed to a second term and elected president of the state's ag board. Henrico County Farm Bureau President Gatewood Stoneman and Madison County Farm Bureau President William Crigler were selected to join the group, as well as Lynwood Hammock of Pittsylvania County, Frank Brumback of Frederick County and Charles W. Harris of Washington County. The new appointees join Farm Bureau members Herbert Culpepper of Virginia Beach and Joseph Wampler of Rockingham County on the board. Farm Bureau teams up to promote ag industry RICHMOND —Agriculture organizations in Virginia have teamed up to ask elected officials to keep farming interests in mind when making laws. The Virginia Farm Bure...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

luly 1997 Composts reduce and reuse garden refuse The composting of spent plant materials is a recycling process you can conduct in your own backyard. By making compost, you reconstruct the process by which organic matter is broken down by microorganisms in nature. You will transform kitchen and yard wastes into a beneficial soil conditioner. You will also keep recyclable litter from overburdening the landfills. When added regularly to gar- ... 40% of people in Virginia over 65 \ will enter a nursing home facility* - ... their stay will cost them between mm $75,000 to $125,000** HHPHI a And For Many Virginians Their Nursing Home Stay Could Wipe Out Their Personal Assets And Their Retirement Savings! Don't become a victim! Protect your future! Contact the Virginia Farm Bureau...today! With 5 Long Term Plans to choose from...you can select a plan that will provide benefits for the care you need...in the setting you prefer! Some Benefits of Our Plan Are: • Care or Assistance • Adult Da...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

Farm Bureau News Make your own compost bin (Continued from page 5) manure, fresh grass clippings, or new hay. Repeat the layering pattern until the bin is full, alternating between plant wastes and nitrogenrich materials. The top of the pile should be low in the center so that water will move into the mound. Water the pile as necessary to keep the contents moist, but not soggy. Within days the pile should heat up significantly. If a pile fails to "cook," there is most likely not enough nitrogen, or perhaps not enough moisture. Each month, fork over the pile, putting outside materials inside and visa versa. The plant materials should Driving program a success (Continued from page 2) must keep. After watching the video, a Farm Bureau insurance advisor reviews a driver safety workbook with the teen. The program is completed when the teen-ager signs a contract agreeing to keep the four promises. . — PMNKILLER It works better than a pain pill! Rising Dental Costs Are Becoming A Headache ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

July 1997 Ag classes teach youth 'real world' skills (Continued from page 1) 1996 high school graduate who will attend college in the fall, Morris said ag classes and FFA build character and self-worth in students who might not otherwise compete in athletics or other school programs. Robert N. Carpenter, president of the Virginia Council of Farmer Cooperatives, told the group that he supports state officials' efforts to improve academic standards. However, he suggested that they not do it at the expense of ag education classes. A survey of students in leadership roles indicated that students would like to take courses that have practical applications to the "real world," Carpenter said. "Vocational agriculture goes a long ways toward providing that." Through hands-on activities and projects, students learn welding, electrical wiring, carpentry, engine repair, forestry, gardening and recordkeeping. They apply math and science to their ag class activities. When working on carpentry pr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1997

Farm Bureau News Colonial Downs horse track opens Sept. 1 By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor NEW KENT—Rhythmic hoof pounding, cheers and loud speaker announcements will fill the air when Colonial Downs Racetrack opens on Sept. I. Construction of the $45 million pari-mutuel horse racing facility is nearing the homestretch. The facility will have the largest turf track in North America and the second largest dirt track. Colonial Downs will boost the Virginia horse industry, which already contributes $1 billion to the state's economy each year. The track could eventually create the equivalent of 300 full-time jobs. It is projected to contribute $11 million directly to the state's economy. Of that $11 million, about $4.2 million will go into state tax coffers, $2.2 million to local taxes and $1.7 million to other tax pools. Close to $3 million will go into the Virginia Breeders Fund, which helps promote the horse breeding industry in Virginia. Colonial Downs will be Virginia's first...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x