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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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San Gorgonio Pass, San Bernardino County. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

San Gorgonio Pass, San Bernardino County. A correspondent of the Los Angeles Star says:—lt (the San Gorgonio Pass) is an immense plain, ten to fifteen miles wide, extending before us further than the eye pan reach. We had entertained the idea that this famous pass was a narrow gorge in the mountain, hence the scene which !•■.': miles from San l''rsiicisro~Altittuli! !>,374 feet. opened on us, and expanded in grandeur as we procoeded, took us wholly by surprise. We saw before us a vast extent of country, apparently as flat as a table, wide as the eye could reach, bounded on each side by a lofty range of hills,which, on the right, run up to the San Gorgonio Mountain, and receding toward the desert into low sandhills, as did also the hills on the left. On our loft, going out, we pass the ranch of Dr. Edgar, known as the San Gorgonio; next to it the ranch of Dr. Smith, said to be on the divide of the pass; and, three miles further on, the Chapin ranch. Here, ascending a steep...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BT OUB LADX EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
My Neighbor. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

My Neighbor. JEAN B. WASHBURN [Written for tho Tress.] She is rtttive in all childish sports; fancies herself a blooming girl of eighteen, though half a century has furrowed her forehead and trailed lines of white through her brown hair. She has no mental record of those years, whose snowy foot prints have changed her looks, and bent her once upright form. Some call her idiotic; but it is a simplicity, a childishness without that dreadful void which belongs to idiocy. She once had bright dreams of a future. In the days of her girlhood, she was intelligent, an ordinary girl in smartness, who loved and supposed herself beloved. We will go back to that blasted youth. Behold her as she stands with a young friend, confiding the expectant bridal ceremony to her, radiant with happiness, trusting, as youth always docs in full faith of no disappointment. "Delia, "said her less confiding friend, " Are you perfectly happy ?" "Happy as tho sunlight dancing on the river," she answered. "I have a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
About Pets. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

About Pets. Yesterday I heard a boy wishing for one of our California gray squirrels for a pet. Some peoplo are very fond of pets, will always have something for a pet. Just so far as potting leads to kindness of feeling, I am in favor of petting. But all cannot afford to have rare and costly pets. Now I think we might have very interesting pets among those animals which are useful as well as amusing. One of my neighbors has a pot mule. When he comes into the stable and asks if she loves oats, sho shakes her head. When he asks if sho loves- barley, she nods her head several times. She speak as plain as she can. I onco had a pot rooster. He would crow any pleasant day, Avhenever I told him to. When I was quito a small boy I had a pet cat, which was the sourco of much amusement; and besides was as useful in hunting rats and mico as any terrier dog of his size could possibly be. He would come when his name was called, and was always very playful and active, would follow us over the far...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Home Made Fun. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Home Made Fun. Wo clip the following description of " Potatoo Pantomimes" from the Hearth ai,d Home: —" Potato Pantomimes" may bo as old M the hills, but I confess not to have heard of or seen them until quite lately. So perhaps you have not. Tako a good Hized potatoo with a smooth skin; cut out nose, eyes and mouth; twist curled horse hair into the shape of a wig and whiskers or moustache, and fasten on with pins; then make a hole for the forefinger to go into: this gives the head a throat. Wrap a bit of cloth, a handkerchief, or whatnot round the hand, arranging ono corner of it around the second finger. Then you have a little man with hands and arms; capable of bowing and moving his head. Make a screen, let four or five youngsters bo behind it, each with their potatoe characters; and as they say the words of the charade, burlesque or tragedy let these potato men perform. It is capital fun, and beats Pnnch and Judy out of the field. Potatoe men have amiable dispositions. They are ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Chemistry of the Kitchen. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Chemistry of the Kitchen. lthough it is generally admitted that a thorough knowledge of chemical science would be of value in the kitchen, we do not deem it necessary or desirable that those employed in or directing the labor of tho kitchen should be chemical experts, yet a knowledge of the broad principles upon which tho more ordinary operations depend, will result in a great improvement in the character of cooking in general, and a great saving in the quality and quantity of provisions and fuel. We do not proposo to enter into any speculative views or improvement!, but confine our remarks to principles well established, and universally admitted among all theoretical and practical chemists, although such principles may appear contrary <<» the preconceived notions of some of our readers. Tho subject will be discussed under the heads of Boiling, Roasting, Baking, Stowing and Frying. Boiling. — When a liquid ia placed over tho lire to boil, tho vessel becomes hea...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A NEW KIND OF WINE.-Dr. Thudichum, [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

A NEW KIND OF WINE.-Dr. Thudichum, in his lecture on wines at the Society of Arts, introduced a new wine which had been made from tea. He stated that the wine was a good stomachic, and would probably be usefnl both in ordinary diet ! and as a medicinal remedy. wM

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Household Sins. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Household Sins. Some cooks will throw out the water in which moats have been boiled, without letting it cool to take off the fat. Bits of meat are thrown out which would mnke hashed meat. The flour is sifted in a wasteful manner, and the bread pan left sticking to it. Pie crust is laid by to sour instead of making a few tarts for tea. Cold puddings are considered good for nothing, when often times they can be steamed for the next day. Dish cloths are thrown down where mice can destroy them. Vegetables are thrown away that would warm nicely for breakfast. The scrubbing brush is left in the water. Tubs and barrels are left in the sun to dry and fall apart. Nice handlod knives are thrown into hot water. Silver spoons are used to scrape kettles. Cream is allowed to mould and spoil. Coffee, tea and spices are left to stand open and lose their strength. The cork is left out of the molasses jug, and the flies take possession. Vinegar is drawn into a tin basin and left to stand until both b...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Domestic Receipts. Rhubarb Vinegar.—lt is said that a very excellent vinegar may be made from the rhubarb plant in the following manner: For five gallons take 12 ordinary sized stalks of rhubarb; pound or crush them with a piece of wood in the bottom of a strong tub; add 3 gallons of water; let this stand 24 hours; strain off the crushed rhubarb and add 9 pounds of sugar free from molasses, and a small teacupful of the best brewer's yeast; raise the temperature to 65° or 68°, and put into a 12-gallon cask; place it in a position where the temperature will not fail below Go°. In a month strain off from the grounds, returning it to the cask again, and let it stand till it becomes vinegar. To Make Clothing Water-proof.—Dis-solve half a pound of sugar of lead in a bucket of soft water; add half a pound of alum and stir till clear. Put the garment to soak in the liquid for 24 hours, then take out and hang uj) to dry, without wringing. This mode of rendering cloth water-proof is capable o...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Mechanical Hints. To Produce Upon Iron a Durable Black Shining Vabnish. —Take oil of turpentine, add to it, drop by drop, and while stirring, strong sulphuric acid, until a syrupy precipitate is formed, and no more of it is produced on further addition of a drop of acid. The liquid is now repeatedly washed with water, every time refreshed after a good stirring, until the water does not exhibit any more acid reaction on being tested with blue litmus paper. The precipitate is next placed upon a cloth filter, and after all the water has run off, the syrupy mass is fit for use. It is painted over the iron with a brush; if it happens to be too stiff, it is previously diluted with some oil of turpentine. Immediately after the iron has been so painted, the paint is burnt in by a gentle heat, and, after cooling, the black surface is rubbed over with a piece of woolen stuff dipped in, and moistened with linseed oil. It is said this varnish is not a simple covering of the surface, but that it...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LIFE THOUGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

LIFE THOUGHTS. Expect nothing from him who promises a great deal. PeopijE obey willingly when they are commanded kindly. Hold your little twinkling light boldly and honestly; then God will pour in the oil and make it a blazing torch. The vain man idolizes his own person, and here he is wrong; but he cannot bear his own company, and here he is right. From the small hollow of the dice-box arise fear, rage, convulsions, tears, oaths, blasphemies—as many evils as ever flew from the box of Pandora.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
After All. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

After All. It would be a sad thing, to unbelieving ones, if it should transpire that they are mistaken, after all—if in the end they should face death with the painful consciousness of something more than they have counted on beyond. And unless your faith in unbelief is stronger than that of many another, this may happen. The chances are very great indeed, that happen it will any way. Unbelief is rarely stronger than belief— never so strong when strength is most needed. Unbelief may be in the estimation of certain philosophers, more philosophical than belief, but thousands can testify, have testified, that it is not half so comforting. Philosophy is good, but at certain times comfort is better, and it is always more sweet. Philosophy may help a man to die like a stoic; but belief makes it his glorious privilege to put aside his earthliness like a saint. Then what does one lose, by believing? Nothing, surely. But what may he not lose, clinging ever to his doubt? It is this possibilit...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Mendenhall Theory Again. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

The Mendenhall Theory Again. Eds. Press. —I do not wish to occupy your valuable paper with arguments upou a rain theory that has proven to be a humbug; but when such a correspondent as "Rusticus," whom I judge, by his language and terms to be a learned meteorologist, takes up the defense, with yet strong belief, I would like to know the rock upon which such wonderful and enduring faith is built. As brief as possible, and with due regard to the value of your space. I would like to ask "BusticUS a few questions: — 1. Has he knowledge of the amount of rain that has fallen in Mexico and Central America, each season, for the last nine; and what is the amount of each season. 2. Is the rainfall in those countries recorded as accurate, and over the county as generally as iv this State, and by whom — government or private persons ? 3. Where does he get his information as regards the rainfall in those countries V 4. Did his "course of inductive reasoning" lead him to know we were to have a dr...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The New Erie Sleeping Coaches. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

The New Erie Sleeping Coaches. Theconvenienees of modern travel— how Mfl they multiplying! Cars heated by hot water lighted with gas, cushions of velvet, walls covered with oil paintings, carpets of the finest Brussels, curtains of tapt stiy, bedfl of curled hair, ceilings in fresco, windows of French plate glass, mirrors of the finest quality, seats of carved walnut, walls of splendidly polished hard woods, cornices tit for the finest library, hooks and handles and bars of the Jincst silver. Such are the appointments of the new sleeping coaches built for the Erie liailway, and which are now running between Cincinnati and New York. They call them Drawing-Boom l'alace Sleeping Coaches, and they are worthy of the name. They have the comfort of a bed chamber, the beauties of a parlor, and tin- capacity of a drawiug-room. The seats are reully luxurious, covered with a species of velvet called French moquette, of the most beautiful colors, and with medallion pattern! in the center of eac...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eighteenth Annual Fair OF THE CALIFORNIA State Agricultural Society, [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Eighteenth Annual Fair OF THE CALIFORNIA State Agricultural Society, To oommence <>n On 18th and end on the 9Sd of Beptember, 1871, ai SACHAMKNTO CITY. OVER $20,000 APPROPRIATED FOR PREMIUMS! Liberal SPECIAL PKEMIIMS for all worthy articles exhibited, not mentioned in the Bchednle. Also, in addition to the Premlnmi Mined, the Society will gire a OOLV MEDAL to the molt Meritorious Exhibition in each of the WTen departmente. The Pavilion will be open for the reception of Artlclei for Exhibition on Friday and Saturday, Bept( mbai 10th and loth, 1871. LIST OF PREMIUMS, Open to all the States and Territories. FIRST DEPARTMENT. LIVE STOCK. HORSES. in this department the mum animal cannot be entered more than onoe, except in ■weejwtaket, or us a oolt With its sin- or dam, as a member of a family. No animal will be allowed to compete for a premium anleM free from disease or blemish which can be tmUmitted to poaterity. CLASS 1- -TIIOROI lUIBUKD HORSES. In this class non...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 334 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

'*oN>i"». PionvS^ ~<> ym Pc/ £USH£fcs eT J/H FRANCES* ' ■•fbfagffaral-'JoJneJbufQ' Is issued weekly on Saturdays, containing sixteen pages devoted to Aerlcultui*e, 'Horticulture, Stool* JtiilsiiiK, DomoNtlc Economy, Homo M»uutactureN Meclinnlcs, Inatisti'low, etc. With an able and ample corps of editors, special contributors and correspondents, we publish a liberal variety of articles, entertaining aa well as instructive, which not only make the Rctr.vl, Press an able assistant to its patrons, but an attractive and welcome visitor to every reader in every intelligent Home Circle; for few there are—male or female — will not find pleasure and ennoblement in the study of progressive farming and gardening. Honest, intelligent and correct information is faithfully given, in behalf of, and urging An improved Cultivation of the Soil; A greater Diversity of Products; Better Breeds of Stock; Better Varieties of Fruits; The Culture of New Products; Creation of...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 334 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Farmers and Teamsters, SAVE "i OUR MONEY! HT TTSINCJ THK Patent "Wood Horse Collars and Hames Combined, Which hag many advantages over the Leather Stuffed with Straw. Ist. Dubability, lasting at least ten times as long. 2d. Convenience. Opening below, can be laid on and off the Horse, having one fastening in place of two or three. 3d.'18 one-third lighter than leather collar and hame. 4th. Can be easily nttid, as it is so constructed that the length aud width can l>e changed in • few minutes. sth. as thtro aro no stitches to break, or stuffing to press out, it nkveu I.OHKB its shape, always bearing upon the muscular pHrt of the shoulder, near the ueckth« proper place for draft. 6th. Its smooth, hard surface, giving equal pressure on the whole line of draft, nf.vkii sweats on bubs okf THK HAIR. 7th. Ithaflan important advantage in the stationary curved arch, keeping thk collab from skitino tioht abound the top of tue nkck when heavy tonguee have to be carried (as iv sonic ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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