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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 285 To Be a Nobody, One of, the easiest things in this world is to be a nobody. And one of the surest ways to do this is to go to a drinking saloon to spend one's leisure time. There you will be sure to find a great company of nobodies, and association with such characters produces nobodies in others. You need not drink much' at first, just a little beer or some other strong drink, until you become more accustomed to the stuff. In the mean time play dominoes, checkers, euchre or high-low-jack, smoke a cigarette or a "two-for" cigar, listen to musty stories and jokes or other worthless conversations, so that you will be sure not to have time to read any useful books. If you do read anything it will be of the dime-novel stamp, about the wonderful and impossible hairbreadth adventures of rascals of various degree. Thus go on and keep your stomach full and your head empty, playing time-killing games, and in a few years you will be a thoroughbred nobody, unless you s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

286 The Indian Advocate. i IN MEHORIAM It is with sorrow that we announce the death of another of our devoted religious, Sister Mary Bap tist Hennessy, who departed this life at the Con vent of Mercy, .on the 20th ult., in the 28th year of her age and the 4th year of her religious life. Although young in years, Sister Mary Baptist had endeared herself to all, and her absence will be deeply mourned, not only by the community of which she was a most devoted member, but also by her many friends, especially the pupils who had the happiness of enjoying her patient, gentle guidance. Perhaps the highest eulogy that can be pronounced upon her is that she was a living "Portrait of a Sister of Mercy." May her soul rest in peace. J

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 287 itetit u it 18 -L'UUA.ljto j: t The Third Annual Exhibition of the Pottawatomie County Fair will be held September 16 to 19 inclusive, in Shawnee. 'During vacation some of our young base ball players were raising contending nines on their upper lips. Verily, Mother Nature has her ' freaks in season and out of season. The editor enjoyed a short visit from Mr. Edward Flynn, of Krebs, I. T., and was glad to see the young gentleman looking so well. Hope he will repeat it again and make a longer stay. Mr. W. L. Hall, after an absence of five months, on account of ill health, has returned to the Abbey, we are glad to Fee, much improved. He will again resume his duties as prefect in our schools. Pottawatomie county shipped 800 car-loads of "spuds" last spring. Of a truth, Pottawatomie is the banner potato county of the Union. At the present writing the second crop is in fair condition. By the way, one of our venerable friends went on a day's outing to Bro. Francis'...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

288 The Indian Advocate. Sister Mary John Baptist, of the Sisters of Mercy, died August 20, at St. Mary's Convent, Sacred Heart, at the age of 28- years. She was an efficient teacher and an exemplary Religious. R. I. P. , The only one we know of who didn't grumble about hot weather, killing heat, etc., during the summer was Rev. D. Suitbert, O. S. B., 83 years of age. This may account for his good health. If you wish to keep cool and well, friends, don't grumble. Beginning September 15, there will be a daily mail both ways be tween Asher and Violet, by way of Sacred Heart and Vista. This is, says the Altruist, the result of good work by Postmasters McCurry, of Asher, and Ven. Brother John, O. S. B., of Sacred Heart, and will be of great convenience to all offices affected. Rev. D. Blaise, O. S. B., is busy getting things in order for school. Judging from the letters of the boys, they are all coming back, and many new ones with them. This speaks well for our school; and parents, we a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate Vol. XIV. OCTOBER, 1902. No. 10 THE ROSARY. In olden days, long past and dead, The Orientals wove a crown Of roses sweet, to deck the head Of men and gods of high renown. t . And Christians, too, their garlands wove For Mary's brow, in crypt and shrine, Transferring, thus, from pagan Jove, The homage due our Queen Divine. ,- i But soon a wreath of prayer and praise More preciolis far than aught of gold, Replaced this crown of ancient days , ., Among the nations of "The Fold." At length this wreath of flow'rs sublime, Which Christians wove on bended knee, Encircled ev'ry race and clime, And hence its name The Rosary. A Croivti of Rosea such we call This chaplet of Our Lady fair, , Whose mystic beads so well recall The saving truths we speak in prayer. No other prayer ascends on high More redolent of hope and love; No better shield when danger 's nigh, No surer guide to heaven above! It, changes sinners' evil ways, M vim cumiuii'i in iiie iiuur ui si rue. A peace i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

fljjpfP"'55r'ri-'-Tww? 290 The Indian Advocate. Among the HalMBreeds 3C2J3 323J of the Great Northwest, T. JOSEPH'S Dav. 1800. was an eventful one for the Catholic missions in the "Great Lone iana 01 vanaaa. un mat nappy aay tne nrsi Canadian half-breed received the holy order of priesthood. This ordination of. the Rev. Father Cunningham put an end to the old Canadian prejudice, "a half-breed will never make a priest." The example of Father Cunningham has found an imitator in the Rev. Patrick Beau- dry, O. M. I., now a deacon and shortly to be raised to the priesthood. The Canadian half-breeds are a very interesting and prom ising race. Their history is a curious one. Long years ago the whites who dwelt in the great Northwest were so far away from any center of civilization that they were practically cut off from the world. For more than half a century they had neither priest, nor school, nor church. Yet a large number of them were French Canadians who had been brought up as childre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate. 291 women passed over at once into the possession of the winner. Such were the first parents of the Canadian half-breeds. They formed the nucleus of a race of mixed blood, differing in manners and customs but little from the Indian tribes around them. In the winter they hunted the buffalo, in the spring they fished along the great rivers. The great trading companies employed them as trappers, but took no pains to teach them either the elements of reading or writing, or even those of agriculture. Not till the Catholic missionaries came did real civiliza tion begin to be introduced among them. Nowadays all is changed. A visit to a typical mission station that of St. Albert, not very far from Edmonton, in Alberta, one of the four districts of the Northwest Territories of Canada (viz: Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, Alberta and Athabasca) will in dicate this amelioration. The mission contains 175 families, most of them with numerous children, .for the half-breeds are a ve...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

"" "iupi,' V i'iipy JWHf1'" 292 The Indian Advocate. head of cattle and as many horses. Oxen and horses were used for plowing and for draught. Milk was used for food and for making butter. The lay brothers were of immense service, but it was not unusual to see a priest, sometimes even the bishop, axe in hand cutting timber for a new build ing, or driving the plow, reaping the corn and mowing the grass. These hard labors have been rewarded. A religious, honest and industrious population is rapidly being formed. The mission itself is the center of extensive farming opera tions. All around the residence of the bishop is a great farm, with numerous flocks and herds, and where the most modern farming appliances are in use. The nuns also pos sess a fine farm, which three years ago produced about seventy-two tons weight of grain, including wheat and oats, whilst at the same time the mission lads produced 144 tons of the same. There is a seminary in the mission, whose chief object is the fo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

i 'btRwwn' vywj1.1" jji" itf rv The Indian Advocate. 293 aywwiiim'n '?tf.www 'iftimm, ,, . 1 i5 The Tom Starr Treaty. j ' ARELY has a government or a nation been forced WW to the extremity of entering into a treaty of peace wiiu uiic ui lis uwii suujcuis. vve nave, uuw- ever, an instance of it in the Cherokee Nation. Though his reputation was by no means enviable, yet it will be recognized by those who, understood the surroundings of Tom Starr tfyat ,his outlawry was due to a combination of circumstances that appeal strongly to the sympathies of his fellow- men in his behalf. His history is without paral lel in the annals of his nation. Nor do we pretend to furnish it in these pages, his adventures being numerous and interest ing enough to fill a large volume. Born in the old nation, the son of James .Starr, a good, law-abiding citizen, there was nothing in his boyhood indicative of the sjrange, nomadic life that was to follow; on the contrary Tom was an energetic, ambitious lad, ea...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

2g4 The Indian Advocate. When the threat was made he had a premonition of what was about to happen. He knew that the parties who had mur dered the others would find a time and place to carry out their threats toward his father. Therefore he began the onslaught instead of assuming the defensive. The first act that com promised Tom Starr and outlined his desperate career was the killing of David Buffington. A number of people had assem bled to witness a foot-race between a white man named Frank Marrs and a negro, the property of one of the Johnsons. Angry words were exchanged between -Buffington an 1 Starr relative to the political troubles of the time, which ended in a duel between them. The former used a pistol, the latter a long knife. Starr, being quick as lightning in his movements, succeeded in stabbing his opponent fatally before the other had time to use his pistol with effect, and David Buffington was slain. From that time forward Tom Starr became an outlaw, on the scout from...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

Fmw "- The Indian Advocate. 295 that he, Tom Starr, would ride slowly until the party had overtaken him. Such bold challenges are supposed to have saved his life on more than one occasion, for Tom swore that he would never be taken alive, and he never was. The number of men killed by this daring outlaw has been variously estimated, and it would be an utter impossibility to reach the correct truth. During the first nine months suc ceeding the Ridge and Boudinot murders, United States In dian Agent McKissick reported thirty-three assassinations. A fractional portion of these killings have been charged to Tom Starr, but he has no doubt been credited with a number of crimes that he had no object in the world in committing. He never killed wantonly nor for plunder's sake, but only for revenge. He was carrying on a war of extermination singly, and, once having marked his man, he rarely, if ever, failed to "wipe him out." Although fearing not to face any living mortal, he was more than onc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

296 The Indian Advocate. mode of living. He was again relentlessly pursued by the officers of the law, and met with such hair-breadth escapes as have seldom been recorded even in the most sensational lit erature. On one occasion, it is said, when closely followed by marshals and a pack of bloodhounds, he leaped into the Canadian river and swam to a spot where an overhanging branch touched the water's edge; catching on with his teeth, his mouth and nose over water, his head and entire body con cealed from view, he remained in that position until his pur suers, supposing him drowned, at last gave up the chase. For a short time after this incident Tom Starr was reported dead,- but he was heard from in Eastern Texas a few weeks later. A large reward was placed upon his capture, dead or alive, and fully half a dozen deputy marshals and Cherokee officers laid plans to ambuscade or otherwise entrap him. Starr was not a highway robber as reported by his enemies, nor was he a robber at all. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate. 297 circumstances. It is true that he was often associated with lawless men, who, like himself, were fugitives from justice, but it was impossible for him to avoid this contact, though it is almost universally believed that he had no personal inter est in their transactions. He used them when it suited his purpose, and they never failed to assemble at his call. His favorite signal was the scream of the night owl, which he imitated to perfection. When the notion struck him, Tom Starr would leave the Territory sometimes for many months, having once or twice gone as far as California. He constantly visited Southeastern Texas and Louisiana. Traps of various kinds were set to catch the wily outlaw, but he was shrewd enough to be out of reach at the time he was expected, for he had a very keen scent for danger when it was in the wind. His vengeance was especially directed on those of his own people who were wont to betray him into the hands of the law, and whenever he...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

298 The Indian Advocate. "The Saint of Oregon." Passing of Father Croquet, the Noted Indian Missionary. CAREER which exemplified in all its phases the wonderful workings of Divine guidance was brought to a close at Braine l'Alleud, Belgium, on August 8th, when Mgr. Croquet passed to his reward. His death is chronicled in the latest issue of the Catholic Sentinel of Portland, Ore., the State which had the honor of claiming him as its saint. Father Croquet spent the best years of his life in laboring among the Indians, and the 'conversion of most of the Catholic Indians on the Western coast was due to his indefatigable labors. Mgr. Croquet was born in Braine l'Alleud, in Belgium, in the year 1818. He was educated for the priesthood in the famous seminary at Malines, and after finishing his course there, he attended the University of Louvain. He went to Oregon in 1859, and remained in Oregon City for one year with the saintly Archbishop Blanchet. Then for eight months he remained at St...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

gJlPyyWifjIftP'Hg"' "yl TWWWPMMpipP. ,4 The Indian Advocate. 299 he was created Monsignor by the Pope, at the request of Archbishop Gross. In his eightieth year, yielding to the ear nest solicitations of his nephew, Mgr. Desiree Mercier, a pro fessor in the great University of Louvain, he retired to Bel gium to receive that care and attention which his weight of years and labors made so necessary. Mgr. Croquet breathed his last in his native home; but his heart remained to the end in Oregon, although for forty long years he never knew anything there but labor, poverty and privation. In his letter to the Sentinel, Father Van der Heyden, who attended Mgr. Croquet's funeral, spoke of the honors paid to the humble American missionary, adding: "How great his devotion to the red-skinned parishioners of the Grand Ronde reservation was, they and his colleages of the Western mis sion know best. In that devotion he never faltered; for, not more than six weeks ago, his nephew, Mgr. Mercier, th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

300 The Indian Advocate. Croquet start a fire and give them something to eat. With much good will he made every endeavor to make his guests comfortable, and invited them to sit upon the straw bed, or the log by the fire, which he proceeded to build with wood gathered and hewn by himself. He pleaded with them to allow him to go oyer and get food from the agent for them, but they insisted that he open up his own cupboard and "share his own food with them, as became a brother." He produced flour ground by his own hands by means of the primeval grist mill composed of two stones hewn for the pur pose. Besides this he had only rice and some few potatoes. He was so very humble that it was only by a strategy like this that his virtues became known. The Indians were the sole object of his solicitude; he lived among them as one of themselves, sharing their joys and their sorrows, not much better clad, and, of his own free choice, not much better sus tained. Whatever he had above the most ordi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

301 I The Indian Advocate. ftw Moral Obligations of the Teacher, HE true teacher will always bear in mind that the child entrusted to his care is to be fitted to cope with the questions and issues that surround men and women in every-day life. By this, it is not intended to imply that moral and religious in struction are not to be considered, because they form very important questions in every-day life; but God has given Caesar claims upon us as well as Himself, and He has commanded us to "ren- . der unto Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and unto God the things that are God's." There are certain eter nal truths that children are to be taught to fit them for their eternal home hereafter, and these truths it is a mortal sin not to teach, and a mortal sin not to know, the opportunity for learning them being at hand. But inasmuch as God has placed us in this world to prepare for the next, we must be furnished, also, with the means necessary to meet the require ments of this world. H...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

302 The Indian Advocate. associates, must always be careful to avoid condemning, or even venturing an opinion upon subjects with which they are not thoroughly acquainted, and in which their prejudice plays a more conspicuous part than their knowledge. It does not take long for them to make this state of their mental condi tion evident to some of their associates, at least, and this done, it will not take long for others to share this knowledge, and the teacher's standing is impaired for life. The "fad-worshiper" is not an honest teacher. He is nar row, sees but one thing at a time, and that darkly, and, too often, imagines that what he does not know, or has not heard of, does not exist. Even his "fad" has but a slight hold upon him, for he soon abandons it for another, and flatters his vanity with the idea that in so doing he is giving evidence of being "progressive." Within what a narrow circle would our lives run were we confined by the paltry measure of our own seeing and doing! ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

The Indian Advocate. 303 has filled the world with harmony and melody and He has given us ears with which to enjoy them, and if He has im planted religious elements in man, He has also given him the means of fitting culture. To the spiritual cry from within us, He has answered with Revelation and Truth. These are val uable arms in the hands of the true teacher. With these he can mould both the children of God and the children of the country. Let him, then, open his eyes that he may see be yond himself, and fulfill his high and holy mission as he should. A writer in the New Century recalls the following story told by Col. Dallas, of the regular army: Once, accompanied by two other officers, he was making a trip on horseback through a wild and lonely Section of the Rocky Mountains. The Indians were restless and in some places hostile, and the journey was dangerous. One day they encountered a band of mounted Indians, armed with rifles held ready for action. As j. they met both parties ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1902

304 The Indian Advocate. Golden Chains, "And thou, if thou shouldst never see my face again, pray for my soul. More things are wrought by prayer than this world dreams of. Wherefore, let thy voice rise like a fountain for me night and day. For what are men better than sheep or goats that nourish a blind life within the brain, if, knowing God, they lift not hands of prayer both for themselves and for those who call them Friend. And so the whole round earth is girt with golden chains about the feet of God." Gold bears the test of fire; it is distinguishable among met als by its weight; its value is intrinsic, because it has qualities peculiar to itself. It is found in the earth the streamlet, carrying off the soil, often reveals its presence. He who bears within his breast the golden virtue of charity, may be tried in the furnace of affliction; those dear to his heart may be taken by death; his earthly goods may melt from his possession; friends may grow unloving; but his heart, anima...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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