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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

THE SHARPLES Farm and Factory Cream Separators They produce a cream unequaled in quality. tIP^I^ They will get more butter out of the milk than can <^Hjlr otherwise be obtained. >^^^ll In durability and light cost of repairs they have no <^^^^^^^ In case of management and reliability they excel. {iTf They have greater actual capacity in proportion to fKk first cost than any other. JjEfla. Their record in actual use has proven them the fJpfiMpißJfr safest of all separators. They Handle Cream as Nature Intended. THEY DO NOT Draw it over edges of discs or interior contrivances. THEY DO NOT Wire draw the cream through a hole in a screw. They deliver it over our smooth cream lip, insuring a smooth, solid cream in best possible condition for any purpose. Capacities range from 300 pounds per hour to 6000 pounds per hour Send for catalogue. Branches: P. M. SHARPLES, Toledo Ohio. Westchester, Pa. Elgin, 111. St. Paul, Minn. G. W. KNEIB, Dubuque, lowa. Special Pacific Coast Agent, Om...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

RANCH AND RANGE Vol. 4 No. 51 WILLIAM H. PAELIN. Mr. William H. Parlin, manager of the Parlin & Orendorff Co., one of the most prominent firms manufacturing agricultural implements in the United States, is spending several weeks in Seattle, combining business with recre ation. The Canton plow, in all its varia tions, and Superior drill, so familiar to our readers throughout the Northwest, are products from the great factory of which Mr. Parlin is at the head. The business was established by Mr. Par lin's father in 1842 and is a remark able evidence of the development of American industry. It has been doubling in capacity every five years, and even now the plant finds that it is so crowded with orders that they are obliged to run overtime. In the course of an hour's pleasant conversation with a representative of Ranch and Range, Mr. Parlin in formed us that they manufacture over 500 styles of plows alone, in order to meet the diverse requirements of the agricultural districts of ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

2 MISTAKES IN DAIBYJKG. At the recent annual meeting of the Illinois State Dairymen's Association H. B. Gurler, of DeKalb, talked about the mistakes of dairying, ami from notes taken at the time we reproduce some of the points he made. Mr. Gurler began by saying iron and steel manufacturers master every de tail of their business. They know to the fraction of a cent what it costs to produce iron or steel at any stage of its progress. Dairymen should be just as particular and master every detail of their business. Profits cannot be made w.'.th the present production of 125 to 130 pounds of butter to a cow. He does not like to believe this is the limit of the capacity of the dairyman of today. There are small margins with cows producing 200 pounds of butter Many dairies now produce 300 pounds and some reach 400 pounds a year to each cow. The cow that makes 300 pounds of butter a year is twice as profitable as the one that produces 250 pounds, and six times as profitable as the one that...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

RIPENING AND CHURNING. To secure the best results I would say never put ice into cream. Some persons advise the putting of ice into the cream when churning in hot weath er, or to strain the cream over ice into the churn. It is a great mistake to do either, as the flavor and keeping qual ity of the butter made from cream so treated are both much inferior to that made from cream where only iced wa ter has been used at a temperature of 45 degrees F. Cream should never be brought below 45 degrees if the best flavored butter is to be obtained from it, and it should not be kept for any length of time at that temperature. In winter weather, when fodder is used, it is necessary to separate at 140 degrees F., and to immediately cool the cream to 50 degrees F., (unless the milk has been treated with a sweetener capable of destroying the bacterial life which causes unpleasant foddery fla vors) this cream is then practically sterile. It is necessary now to breed in it the beneficial bacteria, w...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

4 A JAPANESE VIEW. Pacific Coast Dairying and /ts Rela- tions to Oriental Markets BY L. Y. CHIASHI, TOKO, JAPAN, BEFORE THE LAST ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE CALIFORNIA DAIRY ASSOCIATION. A growing demand for dairy prod ucts, such as butter, cheese and con densed milk, in Japan, China, Hawaii and other Oriental countries makes dairying in California one of the most important of its rural industries, which fact should «nduce a very care ful attention by the people and legisla ture of the state. I have learned, through your coast buttermakers' journal, that the Dairy Division of the United States Depart ment of Agriculture is about to un dertake an investigation of the possi bilities of an Oriental dairy trade and I am also informed that a dairy school will soon be established at the State University, both of which measures should meet approval. I sincerely hope that the educational feature will be adopted, for I realize from expe rience the great benefits of a dairy school. japan's evoiu...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

blight will spread upward and the gummy virus run down, ready to spread the infection. The blight va ries according to the tree. Some va rieties are easily attacked while others are more or less immune. It har near ly driven out the Bartlett and Vicar from southern orchards. With very fertile soils and rapid growth, pear cul ture is almost hopeless. Fertilizers have an effect on the disease, but it is not easily shown. In an experiment with 200 pear trees in pots, intended to show the effect of nitrogenous manures on blight, all the trees blighted. Mois ture favors the disease; drouth re stricts it. The one factor is presence of the germ, no matter what are the conditions. Bordeaux mixture will kill most of the microbes, not all —this would re quire constant, spraying. Filling holes in the trees with drugs is nonsense. The true remedy is. first, cutting out all diseased wood intelligently, and cutting out late in the season all hold over blight. In August and Septem ber the twig bli...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

• THE COLOR CRAZE A correspondent, "Ole Olsen," who not long since wrote a communication advocating the exclusive use of a red Shorthorn breeding stock, returns to the subject, as follows: "In my communication written a short time ago on the color craze I did not intend to cast ary odium upon Shorthorn cattle or their breeders. The Shorthorn cattle are all right. I think the best cow I ever saw was a Short horn, but red, of course. "The fact that Nominee, a roan bull, won the blue ribbon at Omoha. a white bull doing the same in Ohio and Can ada, is no argument in favor of the white bull. As a matter of fact, all the opposition to the color craze comes from the large breeders, and the judges in such cases, I think, were Shorthorn breeders, consequently it would not be much of a surprise to see a Shorthorn judge put a blue ribbon on a white bull. When I stated that the color craze was on, even in the rank 3 of the Shorthorns, I had in mind the smaller breeders and the masses. I have t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

that, as a breed, are unfit for profitable production of milk. This leaves 77 per cent that bred to grades or com mon bulls of no particular breed Some of these bred to any kind of bull they could find to get fresh cows. One man bred to a Red Polled because he was working for red color. Another man did not know what kind of a bull he had last year, but said he had a fine one this year. When asked the breed, he replied: "Don't know; guess he is a Red Polled." Right here lies the secret 01 many of the low yields of our Kansas cows. Our farmers little realize how extrava gant they are in using a common or ordinary bull. Their short-sighted policy leads them to believe that be cause a good animal costs $100, it would be money thrown away to in vest, when in reality it would be money in their pockets. A dairyman can much better afford to pay $100 for a good bull than to accept a poor one as a gift. The importance of a good pire is suggested by the following instance re lated by Mr. Otis:...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

I Ranch and Range With Which is consolidated THE WASHINGTON FARMER, THE PACIFIC COAST DAIRYMAN, THE FARMER AND TURFMAN. Official Organ of Washington Btfttc Da hymen's Association. Washington Stato Livestock Breeders' Association. Freeman & Frcema!i, Publishers.. Under the editorial and business management of HHiLEB FRKEMAN. Traveling Representative and Correspei'dent, LEGII R. FREEMAN. Editorial Offices, - - Seattle, Wash. Telephone Brown 1011. LOBff) distance connection BUSINESS OFFICES Seattle, - - - 315-316 Pioneer Building. Spokane, - Suite F Hypotheekbank Building. Subscription in advance, $1.00 er year. Address all communications to RANCH AND RANGE, 315-316 Pioneer Building, Seattle. Wash. The Indiana Farmer is calling wild ly to the legislature of that state to pass a "San Jose scale law," which will require careful inspection of all trees sold from home nurseries and those imported from other states. It de scribes the San Jose scale as "the most dangerous pest of all, as...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

allow the hog to pick up decayed fruit and fruit that contains noxious insects, it would be beneficial; but in so many instances our farmers will turn the hog in, and not until the tree is hurt or killed will he take the hint end re move the brute. Not long since our attention was called to a beautiful row of White and Scotch pine in which the hogs were allowed to run through. They were already showing signr of re tarded growth, the needles becoming pinched, and the general contour of the tree ruined, indicating that it would be but a few years until these beautiful trees would be dead." CREAMERY AND DAIRY NEWS. A company has been formed to put in a large creamery at Fresno, Cal., costing $30,000, including a number of skimming stations. The manager, W. J. McNulty, says: "When the price of alfalfa is low, the only way the farmer can make money on his investment is to 'turn the alfalfa into milk,' to use the words of Mr. McNulty. It then pays exceptionally well. In fact, when alfalfa...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

10 DIARRHEA AND COSTIVENESS IN YOUNG LAMBS, The bowels are the natural sewers of animals. They discharge most of the wastes of the system, the kidneys do ing most of the rest, while the 3kin also helps. These three are all excretory organs, by which the natural impuri ties and wastes of the system are got rid of. Thus it is that these organs must be watched closely and kept in good working condition. But to main tain them in this condition the system must not be overloaded with such mat ter as will give these organs too much work or prevent their due action Then nature comes in and helps by exciting the bowels mostly to lischarge the in jurious matter. But this excess of work does much harm, and is to be prevented by judicious selection of the food. Just now the early lambs will be wanting just the right feed, and we must think that a young animal mak ing flesh, needs the right material for this, and not that which makes fat. Besides the bones of the lamts are growing, and the mater...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

attention required for the production of best results, therefore the inherent weakness of the colony plan was soon discovered. In the fall of 1898 six new houses were built and in order to economize in matter of time and labor, which were found to be the special weak points in the colony plan, these houses were built on the continuous house and scratching shed plan, with the back side about five feet high, the front seven feet, with a shed roof. The root ing pens are 10 by 10 each, opening into a scratching pen of same size, the whole building being 120 feet long and 10 feet wide and under one continuous roof. Each scratching shed opens on the front into an enclosure 20 feet wide by 80 long. At the time of my visit the ground at the back was being pre pared for seeding down to green stuff, with the purpose of constructing dupli cate yards at the back, so as to give two yards to each pen, thus being able to change the birds from one yard to the other as often as the feed gets eaten d...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

12 NEWS IN HAY MAKKET. At the present time hay dealers are trying to somewhat clean out their warehouses. They are not anxious to have much shipped in and as a matter of fact a rather limited amount is ar riving in this market. About the usual amount is going to Alaska. A little more than ordinarily is being shipped to the Hawaiian Isl ands. Tuesday of thi« week Lilly, Bo gardus & Co. were loading 100 tons on the steamship Manuese for that port and also some wheat. Mr. Bogardus, Sr., will accompany the shipment. While on the islands he will obtain in formation which will be of value in future shipments. The hay market in general is steady. The Seattle market is not quite so good as other places. The outlook is that farmers will be able to clean up their stock of hay pretty well. The matter of "the weather" of Cali fornia is just now of engross ing importance. The last issue of the Cultivator, published at Los Angeles, considered the garden spot of the world, says: The extremely ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

Theodore Hewes, *who judged the fowls at the recent Spokane fair, writes in the Reliable Poultry Journal as follows concerning the Hazelwood White Plymouth Rocks: "It is hard to convince the breeders in the middle and eastern states that just as good birds are bred in the ex treme west as those found among the older and more established strains. They think when they see the scores of the winners at a far west exhibition that the judges were simply 'jollying them up' a little, i have only one way to score fowls. They are no better at one place than at another, so far as the scores are concerned. "When I gave the Hazelwood Dairy Co., of Spokane, Wash., an average score of 95 and a fraction points on 10 White Plymouth Rock*? I scored them just as low as I did the same class at Chicago, quality considered. They are simply breeding such quality that you cannot get away from those high scores when the standard is properly consid ered. Their best birds are white as chalk, up to weight, goo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

14 ALFALFA FOR SHEEP The high price of lambs during the past two years has led many feeders to question whether they could not raise their own lambs. All agree that the problem would be much simplified if sheep could be pastured on alfalfa without bloating. This method of handling sheep was tested a year ago at the Colorado Agricultural College. In the early fall of 1897 we bought 11 old ewes, mixed Shropshire and Mer ino, weighing about 90 pounds each. They were bred to our registered Shropshire ram, Bennett's Prince No. 87674. The lambs were dropped the early part of March, 1898. Through the winter the ewes were fed on al falfa hay. As soon as the lambs were dropped some grain was added to the feed and both ewes and lamb^ were turned onto the alfalfa April 20. At that time the young alfalfa was barely showing green and the feeding of al falfa hay and grain was continued un til the green alfalfa was about four inches high. At first they were given the run of a field containing the ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

SEEDS GROWN IN STATE OF WASHINGTON Pride of Washington Peas, Blue Im perial, American, Alpha and Marrow fat; "All Seasons" Cabbage, Salsify, Shepard Radish, Hanson and Salaman der Lettuce, Coffee Pea, staple varieties Beans, Russian and White Sunflower. J. W. B. DAHLL, Waterville, Wn Emoire * mr^w^^ ocpdrd. Lur ||||' liiiPwl is not only the best V Tf V for the money, but Vk Ymrr It Is the best that can >\-''7i?Mff^— be made at any v Z±£*7?»]K\. price. You need not |_ —jr |Tj ll^k taKe onr word for It , fj'iSt M ■ ask any user; or K3ii&&*K At better still, we will Din M!mifi>&jl put one in your VanlL^yTxlXV/ dairy and prove by tKis^sAi \ actual work every 7*3Bffsr\\ claim we make for . . fff(Wrajlfl \\ It. Our catalogue Is jMyPfliy \\\ free. Address (^ ,">,, \y \<j< FRED Kr.DKi, *"" Seattle, Wash. Printed Parchment -: -:- BUTTER PAPER CREAMER are urged to write us for -: -:- figures and samples -:- Catalogs : Pbicklists of Nurserymen -■ ~' j ' Stockmen, etc...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

16 Che Kowy Odor_ iy~ ' which is so prominent in JSL™IW»* much of the dairy butter, fli^B and which is 30 uffensive Tfi^flT to many people, is the re •^^gr^ill suit of dirt; real fine dirt that can't be strained out. af^ 1111' LITTLE GIANT SEP AIIATOR takes out .ill the dirt, produces a perfect H^ flavor and greatly in- JHSV creases the product. It jtes _^jJs^aL is tin 1 safest, easiest clean- WSi'JFJsimKSSiXfrt*. Ed, and requires less re 'HSjMHß^^S*^ pairs than any small sep- ;irat"i made. branches: p. m. Sharpies Tolpdo, O. Oinalin. Neb. Dubuque, Ta. St, l'uul, Minn Wes Chester I'a. San Francisco, C'al. Farmers troubled with alkali in their land should send to the Depart ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, for Bulletin No. 88. just out, which treats the subject of "Alkali Lands" quite fully. Free to all who write for it. SUPERIOR COURT STATE OF WASHINGTON, for King County. In re-estate Carrie A. V. Seavcy. Notice to Creditors. Notice is hereby given by undersigned, execu tor of...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

OAK HILL * STOCK FARM C. E. LADD, proprietor. SHORTHORN CATTLE, SHROPSHIRE, COTSWOLD AND SOUTHDOWN SHEEP Have now for sale some grand young bulls and heifers at rea sonable prices, and a number of fine Soutlidowu and Cotswold bucks. Address, FRANK BROWN, flanager, North Yamhill, Oregon. We are in the market for -: APPLES:- Car lots or less. .SEATTLE COMMISSION C 0... Office and Warehouse, Columbia Street Dock, Seattle. _ , _ It beats the Klondike when yon can store butter Eggs and Cheese with the SEATTLE AUTOMATIC REFRIGERATOR COMPANY and get 50 per cent In advance In price in ninety days. Try it when you have goods to store FOR SALE Pure Bred and Grade Jersey Cows and Heifers " All of splendid breeding and fine milk strain, and all fresh. SWEENEY BROS., Friday Harbor, Wash. BREEDER OF i^i^mmm^. Ohio Improved Jiiiiiir CHESTER WHITE SWINE The Leading, Quickest Maturing, Least Susceptible to Disease J. M. Newman, Thorp, Wash. Balf our, Quthrie & Co. 220-221 Bailey Building, Seattl...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

'W*» encourages us all. The most successful man is the one who uses the most advantageously the means provided in his especial line. In other words, a successful man will promote his success by the use of machinery that has proved successful. The Disbrow Is the most successful creamery machine of recent years. You should be posted in regard to itTou should see that it is a part of your creamery equipment. It churns exhaustively. Ie works thoroughly. Booklet giv ing full description sent on application. IDEAL SKIM MILK WEIGHERS, ELGIN STYLE ASH TUBS, SPRUCE AUSTRALIAN BUTTER BOXES, IDEAL TURBINE TESTERS, STEARNS STYLE SPRUCE TUBS, IDEAL CORROSIVE SUBLIMATE TABLETS, R EFRIGERATING MACHINERY, IDE AL CLEANSING POWDER, ETC. COLUMBIA IMPLEMENT COMPANY, Portland, Ore., Selling Agents. CREAMERY PACKAGE MFG. CO. 1, 3 and SW. WASHINGTON ST., ChlCagO lIL BRANCH HOUSES: Kansas City, Mo. Minneapolis, Minn. Waterloo, lowa. Omaha, Neb. GOOD SEEDS at FAIR PRICES Farmers, buy your Farm Seeds of a We...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 16 March 1899

lAnch And Range jmBEUm jMi j^__^^^*-^^ •___* _ ______—_————-__ _-—_ Jft^ 41 ISSUED EVERY WEEK fjfr Vol. 4, No. 52 I Two of a Kind I H| The "Hollow Bowl" has commenced to rumble loudly in this section of the country. It has probably ceased to find ||| §f| a profitable field elsewhere, so, like the "low" in the Weather Bureau Report, it has moved westward and now envelopes ||| ■ i| the Pacific Coast with "storm centers" at San Francisco and Seattle. So far as power machines are concerned, it will || II find "conditions very unsettled" for any permanent stay, for the very potent reason that creamery operatoi s are too wide |p IP awake and well posted on the experience of other? to invest in such butter-fat wasting machines. We understand that |j| 111 the "triple current" bowl is no longer put into power machines, in other words, that the manufacturers have ceased to ||| H . make a power size machine. The "bowl that alone revolves" is also getting its share. These two are of a kind. The...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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