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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

4^ 617 % j r^-^-; s Congressional members hear from Va. farmers Concerns over taxes, regulations surface in D.C. By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor WASHINGTON —Meeting with members of Congress on March 19, Virginia farmers expressed their concern over taxes, environmental regulations and the need for agricultural research. More than 130 Virginia Farm Bureau leaders from 52 counties made the two-day trip. Some rode a bus for nine hours one way, traveling from as far west as Lee County. They divided up by districts and visited the offices of the state's II representatives and then met simultaneously with U.S. Sens. Charles S. Robb, D-Va., and John W. Warner, R-Va. Clarence Bryant, a Pittsylvania County farmer, told Robb that federal environmental regulations have taken parts of some farms out of operation. Robb said regulatory reform might be the answer. "We need to try to make sure we don't allow regulators to enact regulations without considering the economic cost-benefit ratio,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

Farm Bureau News Vine-ripened tomatoes are winter-time treat By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist AMELIA —Have you ever dreamed of a juicy, ripe, red tomato at a time when they're typically not available? If you have, then Jackie Easter is making your dream come true. Mrs. Easter—cattlewoman, contract poultry producer and president of the Amelia County Farm Bureau —is growing greenhouse tomatoes that are ripe from November through May. Hanover and other local varieties of tomatoes aren't ripe until June. This means that the only tomatoes Virginians can buy during the winter are either imported from other states or countries, or grown hydroponically—in water. These pale orange varieties often don't match the zing of locally grown summer tomatoes. However, they "taste real, real good," Mrs. Easter said. "They're as close to a garden tomato as you can get." The tomatoes are sold to supermarkets in Amelia, Chesterfield and Powhatan counties. "I haven't had anybody say they didn...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

May 1997 U.S. Supreme Court rules in favor of farmers Just when is "any person" not "any person"? That is the question asked and—at last—answered by the U.S. Supreme Court. The Supreme Court's ruling came in a case brought by farmers in Oregon against the federal government's enforcement of the Endangered Species Act. The original Endangered Species Act, passed in 1973, provided that "any person" can sue to stop the government's enforcement of provisions under the Act. But the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ignored common sense in ruling that only individuals seeking greater species protec- Don't abandon ethanol In California, a fleet of electric buses has been a bust. Transportation officials complained that the buses had inadequate motors. Demand for GM's electric car, introduced in December on the West Coast, has also been Farm Focus American Farm lUtrcan hiteration disappointing. Americans like driving their gas guzzlers. Chevron CEO Kenneth Derr has said, "Although we keep a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

Farm Bureau News Boom-to-bust cycle hitting nation's spud growers HORNTOWN—A huge boom-to-bust cycle in the potato industry has farmers in other states panicking, and potato growers in Virginia are nervously watching the market. Last year's national potato crop topped 1.9 billion pounds, an alltime record. Unfortunately, farm prices for potatoes soon dropped from a high of about $9 a bushel to $1.80 a bushel as consumption fell behind supply. Thus, Idaho and Wisconsin growers may be forced to bury tons of potatoes that are still in storage. Maine growers already face the prospect of paying to destroy 500 million pounds of spuds before they rot. Potatoes can't just be dumped, for fear of causing disease in next year's crop. Unlike spuds in other states, Virginia's go straight to market during the summer growing season. That means farmers here aren't being hurt by the current price slump, but there is still a concern. "With Virginia, every year is a different year," said David Hickman...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

May 1997 '"&a'-\' >^^ u »'.■ y^j, w JIJH .jjjjm^jl.... m ■HHBHHI ™ i 1 UJI IS Mil MP^^l ' ~ r Buy a new Dodge Truck and pick up a ton of cash. Up To $500 Cash Back To Farm Bureau Members. extra $300 to $500 in the deal. $500 cash back on '96 and '97 Ram Vans and As a member, you qualify for $300 back on Ram Wagons. That's on top of any other all new 1996 and 1997 5.9 L V-8 Magnum Ram national Dodge cash back offer.* All you need E_ 1500 pickups. to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm SSOO back on '96 Bureau validating that you've been a member 2500 and 3500 Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to ■■ 5.9LV-8, tThis cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, is scheduled p . p.. . to expire 9/30/97, and is subject to change. It may not be used in combination with any LUmminS Uiesel other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or certain other special programs. Ask ~ m r for restrictions and details. Farm Bureau" is a ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

Farm Bureau News Membership in VFBF reaches all-time high (Continued from page 1) In the previous two years, quota wasn't met until ]une. Between 1990 and 1994, it was met in May. On March 27, the VFBF counted 123,583 members across the state—the most in its seven-decade history. The organization ended 1996 with 123,262 member families. Of this year's record, 15,577 are new members. "Our new membership growth is unreal," commented Lowery. The VFBF not only met its own Labor law reform could ensure worker availibility (Continued from page 1) fraudulent papers. "If 40 to 80 percent of foreign agricultural workers are presenting fraudulent documents, then there's a real possibility we may face a labor shortage this summer or next summer," said Bryan Little, director of governmental relations for the AFBF. "We could lose half of our labor supply," warned Kenny Annis, chairman of the Virginia Migrant & Seasonal Farmworkers' Board. "They're tinkering with the nation's food sup...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

May 1997 Revolutionary "2-in-1" TRJMM ERMOW ER" !7 J held trimmer and rotary mower! mm JJ, • The DR® TRIMMER/MOWER™ rolls {W W> "light as a feather" on two BIG WHEELS! ¥ \ er^ect • TRIMS easier, moving So, WHY HASSLE har D ZMI vr "Poundfor^ poimd the pkce with hand-held trini'lll ''SSllW«1 HMBHKik !>■■■■■■■ — — Farm Bureau News

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

Farm Bureau News Research flourishes at Warsaw ag station Improving farmers' profit is the goal of plant scientists Editor's Note: This Is the third in a continuing series about Virginia's 12 agricultural research and Extension centers. By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist WARSAW—A low-fat cooking oil made with soybeans may be forthcoming, thanks to research at the Eastern Virginia Agricultural Research & Extension Center here. As part of a regional project, researchers at the center are developing a low saturated fat soybean variety. Oil from the bean may have only 7 percent saturated fat — half of what's in normal cooking oil, said Dave Starner, acting superintendent of EVAREC. "If we can create this variety, we already have a market for the oil," Starner commented. Other work is leading EVAREC researchers to a soybean variety that's resistant to herbicides. That means farmers would be able to treat an entire field with a chemical and not have to worry about i...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

May 1997 Tobacco demand to keep farmers in business By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RlCHMOND—Worldwide cigarette consumption is growing 3 percent annually and it looks like Virginia tobacco farmers will be in business for a long time, several tobacco experts said. "Consumers, when given a choice, have demonstrated over and over again their preference for the satisfying taste of American grown tobacco," said Kirk Wayne, president of Tobacco Associates, Inc. Writing in the trade association's recent newsletter, Wayne added, "In my view, the future export potential today for U.S. tobacco producers is greater and much more clear than it has been at any time in the history of U.S. tobacco production." Overseas manufacturers view U.S. tobacco farmers as a dependable source of raw tobacco because of this country's stable currency and government, Wayne said in an interview. Brazil and Zimbabwe are among this country's major competitors. Yet, Brazil has had currency problems and Zimba...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

Farm Bureau News Is marijuana secretly growing on your land? By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Do you hear unfamiliar machinery and voices from remote parts of your property? Have you seen someone else's garden tools in your woods? If so, criminals may be growing marijuana on your property, and they could be armed. Law enforcement officials are counting on you to report any suspicious activity that might be related to marijuana production. "Virginia's domestically grown marijuana has the potential to be a major cash crop," said Lt. W. Roger Rector, a Virginia State Police special agent in charge of drug suppression in 21 counties in Central Virginia. Demand for marijuana is increasing in Virginia. Well-cultivated marijuana sells for $2,000 to $4,000 a pound, said Special Agent M.D. Choate of the Virginia State Police. An average plant produces I pound of pot; large plants produce 2. Arrests & Confiscations Arrests of marijuana growers and plants confiscated...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

May 1997 Pot plots are more difficult to track now (Continued from page 10) over certain suspected patches of marijuana, but it's more difficult to spot now than in previous decades. Once they locate a cluster of patches, they sometimes photograph someone working on the plants. "You can smell a marijuana patch from a good ways off," Rector said. "It has a distinct smell—the flowers and the leaves. "We're making headway," Rector said. "Our efforts are in trying to arrest the grower rather than just destroy the marijuana. It's a small percentage that we're destroying or detecting, compared to what's out there." In 1996, state police and local law enforcement officials in Virginia kept $18 million in marijuana off the streets. "If marijuana is ever legalized, we'll still have bootleggers," Rector said. "Bootleggers would have marijuana with higher THC and a better price. The consumer wants the highest grade possible for the greatest effects." To report suspicious activity... You can an...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

Farm Bureau News Smile even though your politician says no When lobbying members of Congress, you should smile and thank them for their time, even if some didn't agree to support your issue. That's one thing we learned at the annual Farm Women's Forum in Washington March 19-21. I thought that was a good tip, especially since it's hard to thank representatives or senators when they say no. We, as Farm Bureau women, have already had lots of training and practice lobbying for our prior- Ag Activities May 13: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly break- fast meeting, 8 a.m., Holiday Inn West Broad St., Richmond. $8-8 a.m. Contact Clay Roberts at 804-228-3216. May 21: Virginia Small Grains Association-Virginia Tech Field Day, Surry County. Contact Rex Cotten, 804-294-5215. May 22-23: Estate Planning for Forest Landowners shortcourse, Virginia Tech. Contact Dr. Harry Haney, 540-231-5212. May 27: Agriculture Technology Forum, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee, 3 p....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

May 1997 (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) » Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the 10TH of each month preceding the publication month. > Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: ( ) ADVERTISEMENT: ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

Farm Bureau News D.C. trip generates pride for agriculture Our recent participation in Farm Bureau's congressional trip is proof that we're becoming more an integral part of the organization. Twenty young farmers from across the state joined 110 other Farm Bureau leaders March 19 to represent the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation on Capitol Hill. We presented to our elected officials VFBF's views on national policy issues. This was the first time that young farmers were part of the group, and it was very exciting for us. One of our young farmers, Mandi jo Montgomery, was so proud to be part of the trip that she wrote a personal letter to VFBF President Wayne Ashworth. She thanked Mr. Ashworth for allowing her and her brother to attend. "Although we both have traveled to Washington, D.C. before, Save money with toll-free phone option (Continued from page 4) There is an initial $5 hookup fee and a monthly service fee of $ 1.50. However, Gentilini was able to recoup the monthly service f...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

May 1997 Tobacco demand is increasing (Continued from page 9) formula. But centuries of perfecting the cultivation and curing techniques, as well as research and fertilizer, also boost the quality. Virginia growers produce flue-cured, burley, dark-fired and sun- cured tobacco. They are so-named, in part, because of the way they are cured. Flue-cured and burley go into cigarette production. Dark-fired leaf goes into dry snuff, roll-your-own cigarettes, pipe tobacco and plug chewing tobacco. Sun cured is similar in uses. Of all the kinds of tobacco grown in Virginia, flue-cured accounted for 37,700 acres in 1 996. Burley amounted to 10,000 acres; dark-fired, 1,100; and sun-cured, 75. The federal allotment system of quotas, which dates back to the 19305, determines where and how much tobacco is grown in the United States. This program, which attempts to keep supplies in line with demand, is not an arbitrary system. Instead, it is based on projected domestic use, exports and the mainten...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1997

Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ \ ' personalized service can be as close as your own community. «Kl Broad Range of # j£ y QU are unc j er a g e 55 — f or Individuals or families - Coverage • If you are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for fIKEEEI You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget!

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Farm Bureau Volume 56, Number 5 Deer herds eat crops while hunting is limited By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG—A lack of hunting in some areas is causing a boost in deer numbers and crop damage on farms, a wildlife specialist said. "There are more and more refuge and sanctuary properties around the state and many landowners are finding themselves surrounded by property where hunting is not allowed," said Dr. Jim Parkhurst, a Cooperative Extension wildlife specialist based at Virginia Tech. "Individual farmers can fill the skies with lead on their land, but the supply of deer on surrounding land can cause a never-ending ordeal," Parkhurst added. Deer herds are destroying entire fields of crops in Virginia. Some farmers report having seen as many as 30 deer in one field, eating crops. Deer ate the leaves off of 20 acres of soybeans that M.L. Everett Jr. planted in Southampton County. He put the loss at $4,000. Deer also destroyed More students drawn to agricultural cl...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Farm Bureau News Rabies cases increase for 7th straight year By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communication Specialist VARINA —Pat Edwards was standing near one of her family's cow pastures when a year-old heifer barreled up the hill and knocked her flat. "It scared the heck out of me," Ms. Edwards recalled. The attack happened March 13, 1996, and she remembers it well. The heifer had contracted rabies and had been exhibiting symptoms for a few days before reaching the final, dangerous stage of the disease. Other Virginians don't need to be worried about rabies, but they should be aware that reported rabies cases in Virginia have increased for the seventh year in a row. This year there were 188 cases of rabies reported in Virginia between Jan. 1 and April 19. During the same time period last year, there were 160 reported cases of the disease. The Edwards' heifer was one of four cows and two horses in Virginia that were diagnosed with rabies last year. That number was higher than normal, said Dr....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

June 1997 Farmers have chance to help kill death tax Recently a farm woman in Fauquier County suffered the inevitable, traumatic experience of losing her elderly parents. The mother and dad had raised their daughter decades earlier on the family farm. They taught her and her broth- ers the impor- I tance of teamwork, family values and raising a family. Like most loving parents, they willed the farm to their children. Inflation had raised the value of the farm from six decades earlier, but in today's dollars it was worth about the same as it had been in 1935. Now the daughter could continue to farm this land which had been in her family for generations. She and her husband could con- North Korea starves for what we take for granted in U.S. The biggest decision most of us have to make at the supermarket is whether to have our groceries bagged in plastic or paper. Americans worry more Farm Focus American Farm lUireaa Federation about dieting than whether they will have enough to eat. O...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1997

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Farm Bureau establishes relief fund for flood victims RICHMOND—The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation has established a relief fund to aid rural victims of the Red River flood in North Dakota and Minnesota. The fund will be used to provide relief in farming and rural areas affected by the devastating flood. "While most of the news about the floods has focused on Grand Forks, N.D. and other towns, farmers in the rural areas of this region are suffering great losses of livestock and property damage and many will be unable to plant their crops this spring," explained VFBF President Wayne Ashworth. As many as 200,000 head of Vaccination is important for livestock (Continued from page 2) doubts," Campbell said. "She sounded like a mother who's lost its baby," added Dowdy. "That's the first one I've ever seen that's chased a man." The heifer died that night and tested positive for rabies the next day in the agriculture department's state laboratory. The rest...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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