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Title: Dawn, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,014 items from Dawn, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AFTER THE SUN HAS SET. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

AFTER THE SUN HAS SET. ya> VERYONE feels tired and languid after a very hot day. The heat is so enervating and exhausting, rest and coolness seem the only things tobe desired . People who have to stay in town have been pent up in hot rooms all day and their only desire is to escape from them. There are only cwo places of refuge in the ordi nary city home-the door-step and the balcony. The latter is not utilized as often as it should be, and there are dangers in the use of the former that ought to be guarded against. With the thermometer at 90 degrees the thought of a chill is almost pleasant, yet it is quite as dangerous as if the temperature were lower and the mercury nearer zero. To sit on a stone step with no protection but very thin clothing, is to invite an attack of rheumatism, which will be as painful and disabling as if the season were mid winter. A rug, or at least, a shawl should be put down first ; beside making the seat more comfortable, it does away with the danger o...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO KEEP THE HOUSE COOL. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

TO KEEP THE HOUSE COOL. ßVl^UCH of the interior heat is supplied to our houses ^jfg by the kitchen range, which Bridget keeps red hot even in the "dog-days". Prevent this by the use of those wonderfully perfected oil-stoves on which any woman of average intelligence can fry, roast, broil and bake to entire satisfaction. It is more economical than fire, makes no dust and conveys no heat to any part of the house outside the kitchen. The one drawback is the want of a bot water supply for the bath-room, but this may be overcome by using the Tarawera Water Boiler. Having got rid of the inside heat, all rooms not in use should be shut up tight. I mean this literally. Not only should the windows and shutters be closed, but the blinds must be lowered to exclude every ray of light, and the doors locked to prevent the running in and out of the children, who thus admit waves of heated air. We all know that light and hot air impart heat to whatever they touch, therefore this effort to keep out ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THOSE THREE MEALS A DAY. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

THOSE THREE MEALS A DâY. iC7)HIL0S0PHIZE as we will, we must eat in summer as well as in winter. The question is "What can we eat with the least expense of time and labour the least exertion ?" To the housewife, whose means or surroundings compel her to stay in the city during the summer, this question comes home with special force. Housekeepers in the city can solve the problem much more easily than those whose lines are cast in the pleas ant places of the country house or the home farm, where the store-room replaces the market. Unless fresh fruits, salads and vegetables, new-laid eggs, cream, spring chickens, and newly-caught fish are part of the daily production of the establishment, summer catering will be a difficult matter to the average housewife. Preserved foods are an invaluable resource in emer gencies, but they fail to replace fresh food in flavour or nutrition. Still, the housekeeper who cannot count upon an unfailing supply of the latter, should never al low her shelf o...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANNA'S LETTER. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

^ ANNA'S LETTER, jfWHE factory-bells began to ring. They had hard, sharp, cruel voices, and seemed to cry aloud ovt the still, flat country as a termagant mistress might to her servants : Get to work ! Get to work ! Get to work ! At the sound, you might, had you been a bird or the passenger in some great balloon flying before the wind over the village, have seen doors open anywhere all over the valley, and m°n, women and children come forth with tin cans or dinner-baskets in their hands, and turn toward the mills. Some plodded slowly along ; some made'great show of haste. The children ran a while; then stopped to pick up green apples, chase stray pigs or pick wild cherries, and then ran faster. As they passed the post-office, some stepped in, and came out again with letters in their hands, which they read as they walked on ; for the mill people were gener ally strangers who had come from a distance to get em ployment-foreigners of many nations, English and Irish mostly, but mingled ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SHOULDER CAPE. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

THE SHOULDER CAPE. ALTHOUGH the shoulder cape is not noticed among either cloth orvelvetones.it is seen in lace: and makes, with a pretty foulard silk a very desirable finish. It should be of Chantilly lace about half a yard deep, and gathered in very full to a band of ribbon, over which is plaited a high collar of lace like that which forms the cape. To give the effect of high shoulders, a narrow frill of lace is gathered and sewed on just above where the shoulder of the garment is, and this is allowed to flare out in a pretty fashion as if wings were growing. The tiny lace cape, which is specially commended to women who are very narrow across the shoulders, may be worn with any rather dressy gown, and the bonnet or hat, though it should be in harmony with the frock, does not need to have black lace upon it. The autumn capes will reach quite to the knees, and people who are getting very expensive ones will be wise to get them as long as possible.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

"The truth, the truth, and nothing bot the truth." HARDMAN BROTHERS, JWTPW Not True Unscrupulous grocers will tell you, "they are as good as" or "the same as the Primrose." IT'S FALSE-The Primrose never was excelled, and if your grocer sends you something in place of the Primrose, the honest thing to do is ¡end it back.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRIZE REPLY. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

PRIZE REPLY. I.-Because it should be done directly after meals when we feel most inclined to rest. 2- It involves great labour ; has to be done thorough ly ; it includes saucepans and all kuchen utensils. 3- It is so monotonous, never varying, and has to be done more frequently than any other household duty. It is considered disagreeable work because it exposes us to heat and grease. It has to be performed in the kitchen which few girls care about.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FEW PRACTICAL HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

A FEW PRACTICAL HINTS. nN buying a dress always have hall a yan! too £y much to mena with, or make a new collar, cuff-, etc Save all the small pieces for mending, as any gown is apt to be torn. If in the habit of remodelling gowns, buy a yard extra material for this task. Save old buen, not only for mending purposes, but for bandages, etc. ni time of illness. OW towels are useful fnr mending, to cut the good portions out an¿ hem for wash-ragis, -u.d also for cleaning-rags. Old stocking? may be cut down for children, and thu« every "old thing" has its use.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ART OF MENDING. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

Tm ART OF ITIEI}D1I}G. ¡INCE the cry of reform in the way of handiwork has gone over the land, women are taking an interest in the old-fashioned art of mending and darning that surprises one not conversant with the present state of revived, il not lost, arts. Naturally, mending is not darning, and vice 7>ersa, but they blend together like two harmonizing shades. Patience and practice will bring forth wonderful results, as I believe that any woman can mend and darn well if she only wills to do it, and keeps on trying until her object is attained. Many good seamstresses cannot mend, as they never have time to devote to such work ; but do not say, "I cannot mend," for you can, if you will, and it is fascinat ing work to watch the old garment made new.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Original Story. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

Original Story. The winner of Mr. Quong Tart's prize of Half-a-guinea for best story introducing "The Characteristics of the Australian Black Boy," is GABRIELLE FLYNN, Wingham, Manning River. (Age 17.) The prize story was published in the December num ber of "The Young Idea."

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE MATERIALS TO USE. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

TH li MATERIALS TO USE. tjy^EVER put new, stiff calico with old, as from sheer perverseness the old will tear around the new. Buy several yards of thin calico, wash and boil it and iron out. Keep this for all patches and new pieces to be put in underwear, using 40-thread to sew with. I do not approve oí coarse thread or needles in sewing if the material will take a finer, as the former tears old material. In patching a piece of calico, cut the new piece much larger than the old, and do not fell down the seams of the patch. This will raise a storm, as raw edges are not usually considered a neat finish, but they are at least comfortable, and a thick seam is not ii on a thick fabric. Overcast the edges, run the sides around, turn in the edge of the torn part, hem them down and you will have a flat patch, be it on boys trousers etc. Always press a patch on the wrong side when it is h...sh ed. Use linen thread for mending men's or boy's clothing or sewing their buttons on. Lace is mended...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Results OF LAST QUARTER'S COMPETITIONS. Best Buttonhole. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

Results OF LAST QUARTER'S COMPETITIONS. Best Buttonhole. Lady Windeyer's prize for best buttonhole has been awarded to AGNES WATT, public school, Stubbo, (age 13) Second prize-CORA CORNELL, 155 Johnston street, Annandale, (age 15) Small prizes have also been sent to Lizzie Johnston, public school, Bondi ; Rachel Browne, 52 Delbridge street, North Fitzroy, Melbourne ; Ada Marwood, pub lic school, Bondi ; Olive Coombs, public school, Bondi ; Fanny Austin, public school, Stubbo, Mary Austin, pub lic school, Stubbo ; Lilian Barnfield, public school, Bondi ; Isabella Campbell, public school, Stubbo ; Clara Clarke, public school, btabbo.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Omitted Colours. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

The Omitted Colours. Competitors will see that none were quite right. We here give the correct solution. One day when the Brown boys were gamboling on the ¿Tee», the wind, which had been rather boisterous all the morning, Mew (blue) a boy's white hat into the river. The boys dropped their bouquets of purple violets they had been gathering, and ¿reading (red) softly on the bank to avoid sinking into the black mud, they tried to reach the hat. It floated out of their reach, however, and they watched its course with ¿-rave (gray) faces. The owner of the hat grew crimson with anxiety, and Suddenly yelled, "Oh, my white hat is gone for good !" One of the others, the eldest of the party, replied : "It is all very well to yell ' OK (yellow,), but that won't bring back your hat. I will wade out and get it." He did so, and the play was resumed.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO MEND WOOLLEN DRESSES. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

TO MEND WOOLLEN DRESSES. ÖVO^HEN a dress tears, it is nine times out of ten a S^CS zigzag line that is made, to try the mender. Baste under this a piece of the new material, pulling the ragged edges close together, and running a line of long stitches close to the tear, and a second one two stitches beyond. Ravel long threads from a bit of the material ; if you have none, use some fine sewing silk, and darn with them over the unsightly gap, making even stitches over and under the work, running them certainly ¡half to an inch beyond the hole. When done, apply a damp cloth to the wrong side and press with a warm iron, first pulling out the basting threads, or the marks will be pressed in the material. If the tear takes a piece out of the cashmere, or whatever it may be, then baste a piece as before, under the torn edgtm, and use ravellings in a fine darning needle. This time make three small stitches beyond the edge, on the dress, and two stitches over the edge on to the new or inserte...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

LIMITED. 544 WEBV, fSYDNEY. ~| Mt Agente for <% (îîstcn #rgan. ustey TI)E BEST AND The thousands of \Estev Organs in j Homes, Churches, J and Chapels every '-^"^ where, prove their ¿ ? - ? Illustrated Cat alogues sent free. PROCURABLE 6y all the BEST MAKERS. BMB imWWWW WV Wie. EASY TIME PAYMENT. Illustrated catalogues and prices post free on application. W. p. PALING HND MJOTED.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

'Sew* 8c Co., 137 KING STREET, 777 GEOEGE .«TREET, SYDNEY AND ROYAL ARCADES. MERCHANTS AND CATEEBES CHRISTMAS CAKES A SPECIALITY. TRY THEM. ^TLEE fi. j^UNT, TUTOR, SCHOOLS VISITED. CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR Civn. SERVICF. JUNIOR, MATRIC. AND OTHER UNIVERSITY EXAMS. "Saroondu." 122 Glenmore Road, Paddington. MRS. PHILLIPS & MISS HIGGINBOTHAM Hold the following classes in Drawing and Painting, at the Sydney Technical College, Monday and Thursday, 2.30. p.m. to 4.30. Fee, per term, £1 io. Tuesday and Friday, 9.30. to 11.30. Fee, £3 3. Miss HIGGIN BOTHAM gives Lessons in Sketching from Nature. For terms apply, 13 TYRONE TERRACE, UPP. WILLIAM ST MISS BANKS, Teacher of Drawing and Painting. Miss BANKS has received three medals and several other prizes. Inspection invited of over 100 works of Art. For terms apply, CAMBRIAN HOUSE, I DERWENT STREET, GI.EKE. /VLRS. J], jR.OSS. - ARTIST'S STUDIOS, - 32 IMPERIAL ARCADE. fainting ïcssoits (Stunt. Vittitrtcirs for $hijjils. Ccrms 011 ¿^ppli...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Wonderful Things in Nature. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

WLovtotxM Oings in |hturc\ The first one is a little insect, the only one known to naturalists that sits on her eggs to hatch them just like a hen. (Her name is Earwig. Look her up before I write again ) Then the "Raft-Spider"-he spins a thread to sew a few leaves together thus building a raft, and sails away like any prince in his own pleasure yacht. He provides no store for the voyage. He trusts to Providence to send plenty of water-bugs and may-flies where he can catch them as he floats along. There is one animal that walks on its head, the EcEinoderm. The most remarkable thing in nature is the perfect harmony of the colors of bright-winged insects and birds, with the foliage that is their natural home. Surely the Creator must have given these tints to them for their protection, just the colors which blend with their sur roundings and so often hide from the view of their enemies. The soft, dull grays, so like the under sides of many leaves, the glossy brown of many little coats, ...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Something about Fishes. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

Something about Jfisbcs. -*AA/v~ FISHES have been found, it is said, three miles below the surface of the ocean, and when a specialty has been made of deep sea soundings, as in the voyage of H.M.S. Chal lenger and others, the very greatest ocean depths have been found to be very populous. Plants, on the contrary, do not live in the very deepest waters, and it is supposed, therefore, that the deep sea animals either prey upon each other or get their food from dead organ isms and plants which sink to the bottom. The phosphorescent fishes, those which light up the waves about them so brilliantly, are found as far as a mile below the surface. The most of the fishes found in what are called the "abysmal zones'' have only rudimentary eyes. Some have ODly long feelers, but these en able them to grope their way about at the bottom of the sea. On the other hand there are several "abysmal" species of fishes which have eyes so large that they are wholly out of proportion to the rest of their b...

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Why the Crow is Black. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

The Indians of the extreme North-west have some very remarkable legends about the Creation, in which the crow takes the leading part, bringing order out of chaos. Perhaps the most curious is that which ac counts for the raven coat of the crow. One night, while making a tour through his dominions, he stopped at the huuse of Cannook, a chief, and begged for a lodging and a drink of water. Cauu^uk offered him a bed, but on account of the scarcity of water, he refused to give him anything to drink. When all the rest were asleep, the crow got up to hunt for water, hut was heard by Can nook's wife, who aroused her husband. He, thinking that the crow was about to escape, piled logs of gum-wood upon the fire. The crow made desperate efforts to fly through the hole in the roof where the smoke escaped, but Cannock caused the smoke to be denser, and when the crow finally regained the ? outer air he had black plumage. It was previously white.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Missing Word" Problem. [Newspaper Article] — The Dawn — 4 January 1892

"Missing Word" Problem. THE proprietors of the "Tan wera Water Bailer" offer prizes of FOUR BRIGHT NEW HALF-CROWNS to the first four boys or girls, under 16 years of age, sending in correct solutions to the undermentioned "Missing Word'' problem. "Three men who met at East bes hotel, for purpose of holding a sort of ological discussion, were great ologians of three different schools, so to speak-Aism, and Pan ism and osophy. As re was grt-at difficulty experienced in reaching desired understanding y reupon agreed to leave matter to wise man of East bes. y refore .eft East bes hall, and carried ir respecfve arguments to wise man. n wise man, who was very wise, refused to settle matter or even orize, being occupied with a odolite, and furrmore, as he was a ocrat, mes given were out of his line." Open till March iOth.

Publication Title: Dawn, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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