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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SCARSDALE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

SCARSDALE. ? The following letter has been'received by Mr E. J. Aisbett, general secretary to the Scarsdale Old Boys' Reunion " Edncation Office, Melbourne, 20th October, 1915, State School 980, Scars dale. Sir,—A report has been received at this office in which it is notified that the excellence of the equipment and de coration of the Scarsdale school is due largely to the liberality and thoughtful ness of the Old Boys'Association. I have to express the gratification of the Director at the keen interest which is displayed by your association in the wel fare of the school.-—I aui, sir, yours obediently, C. S. M'Pherson, pro Direc tor." Mr Aisbett states that £11 10s ha3 been received towards an honor roll Jov the school.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Grenvilleshire Council. THURSDAY. 4TH Nov., 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

• o Thubsday. 4th Nov., 1915. Present—Crs Poynton (in the.chair), Bowe, Clarke, Vaughan, Nunn, Blake lpy, Reitze, Elder, M'Carthy, Statton, Williamson, M'Menamin, Edgar, Ais bett, Prentice, Kirk, Creed, and Har ridge. TENDERS. No. 4/16—Forming 20 ctiains, Llttlehalea' road, HoIIybush. P. Nolan ... ... £42 .0 0 P. Hynes 34 10 0 R. Hards (accepted) 25 0 0 CORRESPONDENCE. From Crown Law Department, stat ing that a writ has been issired to swear in the President as a Justice of the Peace.—Received. From Chief Secretary, notifying that October 22nd was gazetted a public holi day in the Shire for the band contests.— Received. From Public Health Department, for warding analysis of 6 samples taken un der the Pure Foods Act, all of which complied with the standard.—Received. From same, stating that Nov. 10th is the day appointed for receiving nomina tions for representative member on the Board of Health.— Received. ... , From State Accident Insurance Com missioner, forwarding revised rates u...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Then the Court Laughed. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

Then the Court Laughed. Mr. Justice Darling is generally re garded as one of England's wittiest judges, and his court is seldom free from laughter owing to his smart jests. Occasionally, however, the joke is turned on his lordship. Some time ago, when he was to try an important case, one of the men who had been called on the jury asked to be excused from service. He was dressed all in black atid looked the picture of human misery. "Why do you wish to be excused?" asked the judge sternly. "Because, my lord," answered the man, sorrowfully, "I desire to attend a funeral." Mr. Justice Darling's heart was touched, and he immediately gave the juryman permission to re tire. The mail disappeared like light ning, but when he had gone the judge turned to the usher and in quired: "What is that man by occu pation?" The usher looked at the jury list and replied: "An undertaker, my lord." Then it was that the court laughed outright at the expense of the judge, and even Mr. Justice Darling himself...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GERMAN EYESIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

GERMAN EYESIGHT. Where the eyesight is defective Britain's soldiers in future are to be provided with spectacles free of charge. This calls to mind the me thod adopted by the German military authorities. The number of recruits with defec tive eyesight became so alarming that the matter was investigated, and in the end every short-sighted soldier was provided with two pairs ^of spectacles, one pair to be worn and the other pair always to be carried in reserve. Germany has more short-sighted people than any other country. Even amongst young people of twenty years of age, 5% per cent, are afflict ed with defective eyesight. At Heidelberg University extensive experiments were carried out to dis cover the cause of this alarming de fect, and the professors were satis fied that much complaint was to be lodged against harmful artificial light. A good number of the young men of Hodgetown had gladly responded to Lord Kitchener's call for men, and in honor of the occasion the mayor gave the ne...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DON'T BE TOO SERIOUS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

DON'T BE TOO SERIOUS. we all know women who feel their "deep responsibilities" towards every thing and everybody, from their hus bands down to the latest kitten the cat is so busy washing. It's no good being so serious about things. Of course, we all know life is a serious matter, but there is no sense in making things gloomy, and worry ing yourself into fiddlestrings about everything. Besides, if you tackle the difficulties of life with a smile and a firm resolution to make the best of things, you'll find that responsibili ties are not half so heavy as you fear ed they were going to be. If you feel how deeply serious a matter it is that your husband should have a comfortable home so that he will not be tempted to go too fre quently to the club, it is far better to show your appreciation of this fact by putting on a pretty dress and giv ing"him a good hug and kiss when he comes in, than to give him your views on the responsibilities of a wife. It's the same with the children. Let th...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WAR BOY-BABIES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

WAR BOY-BABIES. It is a popular belief that more boys than girls are born, in time of war. According to a well-known London doctor, however, there is little ground for such an idea. "My experience," he says, "does not bear out the statement that when the manhood of a nation is being lost in battle, Nature asserts herself and mora boys are born than girls. I have never seen any figures to support such a theory, and bave never believed in it myself. "My brother and I work in a district where the strain 01 the war was felt very much, and which has provided a very large proportion of its popula tion for our fighting line. I find that during the last six months of the ma ternity cases we have attended 55 per cent, of the births have been girls and only 45 per cent, boys—or 10 per cent, more girls than boys. "The increase in the percentage of girls born has been especially notice able in the last two months. When the war is over I am of opinion that the figures will show that the theory o...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CUTTING THE CROPS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

CUTTING THE CROPS. Oats, barley, rye and cereal crops j generally should be allowed to fully mature, and 'be cut for the silo when on the tura from the green to the ripening stage, the grain then is well formed but in the milky stage, and the bottom leaves are dying off. Maize, on the other hand, should be allowed to arrive at its highest stage of maturity—that is, When the cob is well and firmly nmtuTed so that the kernel has arrived at the glazed con dition and when taken between the fingers and squeezed it exudes a fine milky substance and is in a doughy condition. Wild oats, thistles and •weeds-vOf all description should be cut as soon as there are signs of the pollen appearing and before there is any chance f their forming and de veloping their seeds so as to prevent any seed from fouling the pastures the following season. Planters' Friend and millet should be cut when the seeds are well formed, but before entering the ripening stage and when the bottom leaves are showing signs...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PITFIELD. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

PITF1ELD. A very successful penny concert was held by the children of Pitfield on Satur day afternoon in the Mechanics' Hall, and as result £2 2s 6d has been for warded to " The Courier " Sick and Wounded Fund. The following children supplied the programme :—Pianist, Miss Nellie Taylor; Mamie Ronchi, Edna and Elsie Taylor, Annie Wasley, Nancy Hynes, Hazel, Lily, and Mabel Clinch, Edgar Uren, Jim Robertson, Frank Wasley, and Reg. Taylor. B. Quarrel! made a capital chairman, and the secre tary's duties were well carried out by Misses Nellie Taylor and Mamie Ronchi. Sgt-Mjr. Trounson (son of Mr J. Trounson, of Hollybush), who has been home on final leave, was entertained by his friends prior to his leaving for the front.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN'S WORLD. HOME INFLUENCES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

WOMAN'S WORLD. \ HOME INFLUENCES A comfortable home 13 a powerful magnet. Its Influence is almost ir resistible. Every wife and mother, in ordinary circumstances, has it . in her power to make home attractive. A good mother and a comfortable home are correlatives, and exercise a wonderful moraMnfluence over tha lives and characters of those brought under so benignant a presidence. Un happy homes have been responsible for more deterioration of character, misery and crime than can ever be estimated, The memory of a good mother and good home brightens the whole after-life of those who once possessed these inestimable bless ings. If wives and mothers would lay. this truth to heart and act upon it, they would do more for the present and future race than (as many are now doing) putting their domestic duties and claims aside in order to participate in the work that this ter rible war has forced on the public, both men and women alike. But charity tegins at home; and if she has that inestim...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

$ 1 NORSE FOR 20 YEARS. Nurse Evans of Tasmania and Victoria, writes her opinion of CLEMENTS TONIC 49 Provost Street, Nth. Melb.i 18/4/12. CLEMENTS TONIC LTD. *' I have beeo norsiog for twenty years Ieb Tas mania and Victoria, so my experience covers a lengthy period. When patients are weak and low, a norse most know the best medi cine to give a patient. Some I have cursed have been so ill I never could have taken their case only I knew Clements Tonic woold quickly restore them far health. What 1 am writing is founded on ex perience that amongst all medicines Clements Tonic is first. It is the nurses' friend, a reliable medicine that will restore the sick to health. (Signed) NURSE EVANS." I i Always keep this Medicine on hand and you will keep healthy. If you get it YOU GET HEALTH AND RELIEF FROM LOSS OF SLEEP, WEAKNESS AFTER ILLNESS, CONSTIPATION, INDIGESTION, POOR APPETITE, WEAK NERVES, and BILIOUSNESS. All STORES asifCHEMlSTS SELL IT. For children's hacking cough at night, Woods'...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Wedding Bells. GREENBACK—CHASEY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

. o GREENBACK—CHASEY. St. Peter's Church, Ballarat, was on November 1st the scene of a qniet bat pretty wedding, when Mr Thomas Green bank, of " Cypress Hill," Carngham, was married to Miss Ann E. Chasey, daughter of the late F. Chasey, of " Shepton Hill," Linton, and of Mrs Chasey, of Eyre street, Ballarat. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. G-. Downton. Mr J. Stevenson acted as best man. The bride, who was given away by her brother, Mr S. Chasey, wore a handsome gown of ivory silk, beauti fnlly trimmed with Limerick lace and seed pearls. A draped train, which fell from the waist, was lined with ivory satin aud finished with lovers-knots and orange blossom ; her beautiful bridal veil being the gift of her aunt, Mrs Bat son, sen. She was attended by her niece, Miss May Chasey, prettily attired in white embroidered voile, with pale pink satin belt and hat of pale pink with forget-me-nots. The bride and bridesmaid carried beautiful bouquets oE choice flowers, the gift of the bride...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOR THE FARMER. AVAILABILITY OF PLANT FOOD. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

FOR THE FARMER. AVAILABILITY OF PLANT FOOD. Plant food, may be abundant in the soil and yet be not available for the plants (observes "Elder's Review"). Plant food is often bound up firmly in hard clods, which the roots of growing crops cannot enter,' and'-.so. reach what they want. Soils are formed by the disintegration of rocks and by the development of fertilising elements incident to the growth and decay of vegetation. Fertility Jhas to be developed in various ways/"'Alter nate rain and sunshine, the heat of summer and the frosts of winter, ploughing and harrowing the soil, working it over and over again, in connection with the application of stable manure and commercial fer tilisers, are all effectual means of de veloping available fertility. We know now, thanks to the discoveries in chemical science, that jt rests with the individual farmer to prevent the impoverishment of tlie soil, and to take care that it is supplied with or ganic matter by means of farmyard manure, ploughi...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HAPPY VALLEY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

HAPPY VALLEY. ? Mr Chesler Bolte, eldest son of Mr John Bolte, having passed the examina tion for Newport workshops, has received notice to report himself for duty at Spen cer street on the 9th of this month. Crops and pastures are looking well. Shearing is in full swing, the clips being satisfactory.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIANS AT "HOME." "WIDE AWAKE FOR THE GLAD EYE." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

AUSTRALIANS AT "HOME." "WIDE AWAKE FOR THE GLAD EYE." There are Australian soldiers every where. The military hospitals have ceased to pack wounded into suffocat ing wards in Malta. Only the most urgent cases are sent into the operat ing theatres in the Near East. The vast majority of the men are being brought direct to England. At this moment there are over 2000 wounded in the old country. The greater num ber convalesce very rapidly. English doctors are amazed at their recupera tive powers. They attribute the quick mending to the indomitable eheeri ness of our native born. Some of them have lost arms and legs, and, worst of all, their eyesight, but none frets about the fate of war. Even if they* did not realise the price of victory they are built of the stuff which does not repine. I have only met one Aus tralian who was at all downhearted, and" he was not worrying over the rot ten luck which had put him upon crutches for life. He 'was mourning a trench pal whose nerves had broken ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sorry He Spoke. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

Sorry We Spoke. The driver of a prison van, known for his ready wit, was one day con veying his victims to durance vile, when a would-be wag on the footpath hailed him with: — "Got any room inside yer carriage, Rubbert?" "There's room for a sma' ane," re turned the driver. "We kept it for you." Nowise disconcerted, the wag made another shot:— "What's yer fare, Rub?" he asked. And Rub wiped him out with:— "Bread and water; same as ye had before!" Joseph had left a situation where he had been for some time, and had se cured another one. A few days after wards, being fond of his late em ployer, he -went to see him. "Well, Joseph, how do you like your new place?" "I likes it real well," replied Jo seph. "Do youi have plenty to eat and drink?" "Oh,-my stars, yes!" "Well, then, tell me, Joseph, what had you for breakfast to-day?" "Well,,, sir, missus boiled two eggs, and I had the broth," grinned JoBej>h.^

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHURCH TAXES [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

CHURCH TAXES The German Socialists are dissat isfied "because the Church taxes im posed on all Protestants in Prussia have, not been suspended in the case of soldiers serving at the Front. Every Prussian subject pays this Church tax, unless he belongs to some other (non-Protestant) Church or notifies the authorities that he de sires to be officially classified as an atheist. The Church tax is assessed on each Prusian in proportion to the amount of income-tax which he pays. But all men serving at the Front, ex cept those whose incomes exceed £150 per annum, have been specially exempted from the payment of in come-tax during the war, so that the suspension of the subordinate Church tax was expected as~a matter of course. The Synod of the Prussian State Church has issued a decree or dering the Church tax to be collect ed on the same assessment as last, year, and the Socialists are wrathful in the extreme, declaring that such a burden ought not to be placed on the people at this critica...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE IMPORTANCE OF MOTHERS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

THE IMPORTANCE OF MOTHERS. By Beach. Telling. We have always been important people, we mothers. But now, in war time, we are more important still. On us, in a large measure, depends the future of our nation—our children must maintain the rights which their fathers have fought and died for. We pray that many of our dear ones may return and enjoy the years of peace which will he. And how will their children employ .that peace? I What will Great Britaia be when the great war cloud has been swept away? Will her sonB be worthy of their brave fathers? That all depends upon us, the moth ers of the new generation. Never in the history of the world has motherhood been such an honor and such a great responsibility as it is to-day. Never has there been more need that we women should realise this. Just think of those terribly long; lists which appear almost every day in the newspapers. The Angel . of Death has touched most homes, both rich and poor. And those men who have died are the flower of...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OUR STRUGGLE IN THE CLOUDS. BOMB DROPPING AND BIG GUNS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

OUR STRUGGLE IN THE CLOUDS. BOMB DROPPING AND BIG GUNS. There is very great scope for im provement in our aircraft service, writes a journalist in London. Offi cial stories notwithstanding, the Ger mans have, within the last few weeks, regained an ascendancy in the air in Europe. They have built larger ma chines, which can fly faster and climb quicker than the type that are now em ployed, while they also carry two guns to our one. We have a new class of machine which will shortly be work ing in the battlefield. They will be called, battle aeroplanes, and will be able to cope with the Germans. Flight is only in its infancy. If the war lasts another twelve months, there will be some startling developments in the struggle for supremacy above the earth. As it is, our aviators are mak ing wonderful progress in marksman ship under most baffling conditions. I saw recently aerial photographs of a big gun which has been used to bombard Dunkirk from a distance of zSy2 miles. No airman dare as...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXXII. The Tents of Ungodliness. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

CHAPTER XXXII. The Tents of Ungodliness. Frank Sommerville, Chief Inspec tor of the Criminal Investigation De partment, a big, dark-moustached man, stretched his long legs from the easy chair in which he was sitting, some Tialf-an-hour after my interview with Lola and Edward Craig, clasped his hands behind his head and, look ing over at me, exclaimed: "By Jove! Yidal. That's one of the most astounding stories I've ever heard! And the young lady is ac tually in the next room with the 'dead' man Craig?" /"Yes; they're ready to go up to Hampstead," I said. "If we are shrewd Ave shall catch all three. They shrewd we shall catch all three. They did that burglary at Benning ton's, in Oxford-street, last night." "How do you know, my dear fel low?" he asked. "For the simple reason that I was there," I laughed. "I remember the report on the Cromer mystery, last June, perfectly well," he said. "But I never dream ed that you'd taken the matter up. We shall certainly do well if we can lay hands...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE Grenville Standard PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed and published by Lionel SPARROW, sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, NOV. 13, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 13 November 1915

THK PUBLI8HED EVERY 8ATURDAY. Printed and published by Lionel SPARROW, sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, NOV. 13, 1915. The monthly evening service will be held at the Presbyterian Church, Linton, to-morrow (Sunday) night at 7 o'clock. The preacher, Rev. A. E. Blackwell, will take as his subject, u How God For gives." A very enjoyable social dance was held in the Parish Hall on Friday even ing, 5th inst., in aid of the Australian Red Cross funds. There was a good attendance, and dancing was indulged in with great zest till about 3 a.m. Mr John Roddis supplied excellent music, and Mr C. W. Roberts was a capable M.C. The ladies provided abundant refreshments. As expenses were cut down to a minimum, the profit for the fund was substantial. A meeting of the committee will be held this evening (Sat urday). Next Sa...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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