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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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"In the Days of their Youth." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

"In the Days of their Youth." PAUL KRUGER. —"Sketch."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GREAT INVENTION. THE COTTON INDUSTRY SAVED MILLIONS A YEAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A GREAT INVENTION.   THE COTTON INDUSTRY SAVED   MILLIONS A YEAR.   A new process for delinting and hulling the     cotton seed and extracting the oil therefrom was privately demonstrated on January 1 at Washington. Eminent chemists present declare the invention to be the greatest step forward that the cotton industry has made since the in- vention of the cotton "gin."   The process enables cotton-growers to do away with no less than six separate opera- tions and a like number of intricate ma- chines. The chemical process, which is a secret one, perfectly delints the hulls, and releases the seed in the space of 20 minutes. By the use of this process, extensive savings in other directions also was effected, and the in- ventors contend that their invention will save cotton-growers no less than £7,200,000 an- nually. Thirty-five thousand ostriches are annually plucked at the Cape. They yielded 260,000lb. of f...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THRILLING TIMES. REPORTED ON A HAIL SHIP IN [?]D-ATLANTIC. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THRILLING TIMES. REPORTED ON A MAIL SHIP IN MID-ATLANTIC. Those on board R.M.S. Port Antony had a dra- matic experience in the South Atlantic Ocean when five days out from port. Most of the pas- sengers had retired to rest, six bells had just rung, when there was a loud and violent ex- plosion. Dense clouds of steam arose from the engine-room skylight, like an eruption of Vesu- vius, according to a Birmingham spectator in the "Daily Gazette," while the roar from below was like a blast furnace. The electric lights were instantly extinguished. Thirty feet down on the lower gridiron was the chief engineer, Mr. C., crawling, calm and determined, on his hands and knees amid the throbbing machinery. In spite of scalding water and steam, he and another man managed to stop the engines. Meanwhile word went round among the engi- neers, firemen, and others on deck that the chief was not with them. Instantly every man dashed through the darkness to the depths below. The order waa given to draw ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A COMING PRIMA DONNA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A COMING PRIMA DONNA.   Edna Darch, the little singer, of Los Angeles (Cal.), who, Mme. Calve says, is going to be the "Carmen" of the twentieth century, and whose training she has personally undertaken.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CHURCH BELL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THE CHURCH BELL. 'Tis the church bell in the steeple That to worship calls the people; 'Tis the church belle in the choir Calls the young men to admire. —"Haarlem Life." Berlin's richest inhabitant has paid a tax of £4660 on his last year's income of £116,750.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO PRESERVE CORPSES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

TO PRESERVE CORPSES. For some weeks past (says the "Tribuna," a   leading Rome newspaper) very important ex- periments for the preservation of the dead have been proceeding at the Conception Hospital, Palermo. The discovery is due to Signor Alfredo Salafia,   and the method is being applied by Dr. Micchi, results tending to show that corpses can be preserved intact and unaltered for an inde- finite period. Thirty-one days after death, corpses treated by this method are perfectly inodorous and dry. The natural color is retained, as well as the plasticity of the muscles and the smoothness of the skin. The diaphanous parts preserve their trans- parency, and the veins remain full and elastic.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW SWINDLE. ITALIAN AERONAUT AND CREDULOUS VENETIANS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

  A NEW SWINDLE.         ITALIAN AERONAUT AND CREDU-   LOUS VENETIANS. Giacomo Merighi, having taken unto himself the style and title of captain, hit upon a hither- to untried method of extracting money from a confiding public in Rome. He announced his intention to cross the Adriatic in a balloon, starting from Murano, and induced a Viennese journalist to advance him a few hundred francs for working ex- penses. On the day appointed for the attempt the public handed over some 5000 francs in en- trance fees to the gallant aeronaut, who there- upon changed his mind, invented an excuse for not starting, tried to get his balloon away by stealth from the grounds of the gas com- pany to whom he owed a large bill for gas sup- plied, and ungratefully assaulted the unfortu- nate journalist who demanded repayment of his loan. For these sins of omission and commission. Signor Merighi is now undergoing, amongst other p...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LITTLE KNOWN RULER. THE SWISS PRESIDENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A LITTLE KNOWN RULER. THE SWISS PRESIDENT. The unknown rulers of the world represent one   of the ideas which popular journalism has not   yet exploited to death. It is not every ruler who is advertised like a German Emperor, or who can boom himself by Peace Rescripts like the Czar. The story is told, says the "St. James' Ga- zette," that one night in the House of Com- mons somebody asked a Front Bench man the name of the President of Switzerland, and the Front Bench man was surprised at his own ig- norance. He passed the query on to his neigh- bor, who, too, had to confess that he did not know, and soon it was clear that not one man in a group of famous politicians knew the name of the head of one of the friendliest States in Europe. Probably not one man in 50 who sees this para- graph will know either, so simple and unassum- ing is the Government of the Swiss Republic. President Joseph Zemp, of Entlebuch, who on New Year's Day stood in the Presidential sh...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"AN ENGLISHMAN, THEREFORE THIEF." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

"AN ENGLISHMAN, THEREFORE   THIEF."     A farmer riding on an omnibus in Paris re-   cently was jostled by two well-dressed strangers,   who relieved him at the same time of his pocket- book containing £80. Apologising for the jostling,   the two got down, and shortly afterwards the   farmer missed his money. He accused a fellow   passenger of the theft, adding, "You see he is   English!" in order to substantiate his accusation.   The Englishman was taken to the police station,   and there he had no difficulty in proving his   innocence. He was released, but the story   shows how easy it is for an Englishman to be   arrested in Paris.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LORD SALISBURY'S PRECEPT. "BETTER TO BE A CAT THAN A DUKE." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

LORD SALISBURY'S PRECEPT. "BETTER TO BE A CAT THAN A     DUKE."     The report that a dukedom will be conferred   on the Marquis of Salisbury at the Coronation   is again revived.   "Nothing is less improbable," writes a well-   informed correspondent to the London "Express."   "Lord' Salisbury is understood to have refused   the step on at least one previous occasion for   private reasons. He prefers the older title. But   now he is on the eve of retirement from public   life he may very probably reconsider his de-   cision for the sake of Cecils yet unborn."   Although Lord Salisbury has never desired to   be a duke, he once startled his nurse by declar-   ing: "Oh, Betty, I wish I was a cat!"   "La! Lord Robert, how can you wish yourself &nbs...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CANCER MICROBE. IMPORTANT EXPERIMENTS BY A FRENCH DOCTOR. EFFECT OF A NEW TOXIN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THE CANCER MICROBE.   IMPORTANT EXPERIMENTS BY A     FRENCH DOCTOR.   EFFECT OF A NEW TOXIN.     At a meeting of the Academy of Medicine in Paris, on December 24, Dr. Doyen, one of the leading surgeons of France, requested the Academy to open two sealed envelopes recently deposited by him. The document in these envelopes was an an- nouncement of a discovery of a new microbe observed by Dr. Doyen in cancerous tumors, and to which he gives the name of Micrococcus Neoformans. As long ago as 1887 Dr. Doyen observed in cancerous juices diplococci and small chains difficult to distinguish from the mass of cellular granulations.   When examined at the end of two to three months these were as active as at the first ex- amination of the tumor. By experiments with the new microbe Dr. Doyen was able to reproduce cancer, and later, by subcutaneous injection of a sterilised solu- tion of toxins derived fro...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Titles for Actors. "SIR CHARLES WYNDHAM" A CORONATION POSSIBILITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

Titles for Actors. "SIR CHARLES WYNDHAM" A CORONATION POSSIBILITY. Actors and other folk in the theatrical world continue to wonder what members of the pro- fession will receive Coronation honors. An "Express" representative has again talked with several well-known players and managers, and found a curious diversity of opinion. The ultra-Bohemian and democratic players affected indifference to Coronation possibilities, while others went so far in predicting knighthood possibilities as to pick the probable winners. A canvass of the London theatres shows that   the three favorites—from the standpoint of the theatrical profession—for Coronation honors are Charies Windham, Beerbohm Tree, and John Hare. Of the first-named one manager of long experience said: — "He is undoubtedly the popular favorite, as he is certainly the most versatile of men, and one who would have succeeded in any profession he put his hand to. A surgeon through the American Civil War, he subsequently se...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BEE CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

BEE CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES.     —♦— The report of the United States Department of Agriculture contains some interesting statistics relative to the rapid development of the bee-keep- ing industry in that country. The annual honey crop is now valued at about £4,000,000. This seems an enormous figure, but the extensive scope of the operations may be judged from the fact that there are now considerably over 300,000 per- sons engaged in the culture of bees, 100 apiarian societies, eight periodicals devoted to the trade, and 15 factories for the manufacture of beehives and kindred implements.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Shortening the Atlantic Journey. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

Shortening the Atlantic Journey.     It is announced from Halifax, Nova Scotia   (says the "Express") that a great bridge is to   be built across the Strait of Canso, which may   be taken to mean that a new rail-steamship route   to Europe is at last about to be inaugurated. It   is argued that no one would ever invest £800,000   in a bridge simply to make unbroken rail com-   munication between Cape Breton Island and the mainland. It is well known that influential men, with powerful backing, and representing vast com- mercial transportation interests, have for sev- eral years been consid- ering the feasibility of a new transatlantic route which should ma- terially shorten the time now required to travel between Europe and America. It will be in no way surprising if this new bridge scheme should prove the first step in a great project to establish a passenger and mail...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PREPARING FOR CORONATION. RENTS OF LONDON HOUSES RAISED OVER 500 PER CENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

PREPARING FOR CORONATION.       RENTS OF LONDON HOUSES RAISED OVER 500 PER CENT. The steamship offices and other American rendezvous in London are already getting inun- dated with applications from the United States to secure seats from which to witness the Coro- nation procession. Nothing definite can be arranged, as the route of the procession is still unsettled. In vicini- ties where it is thought likely that the great show will pass, speculation is beginning to get brisk. Those few town mansions on Park-lane and in the ultra-fashionable squares which will be available to visitors are being quoted at £3000 to £4000 for a short season, and smaller fur- nished houses, usually fetching £600, are on the market at £1000 for the season. The leading hotels have already booked most of their rooms at advanced prices, and several of them have secured overflow hotels, in antici- pation of a rush. The London tradesmen openly avow that they are looking f...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CONVINCING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

CONVINCING. Two young men sat through the first act in a local theatre, then adjourned to a neighboring tavern for refreshment, The acting was bad, and would have excused the use of stimulants by any but the players. When about to re-enter the building only one could produce his return check.   "It's all right," said he of the check, airily. ''You remember him. He's with me." "Yes," answered the doorkeeper, more doubt- ful than polite, "but he may have given his check to some other person." "But he didn't," was the convincing reply. "He's a stranger here, and hasn't an enemy in the city." The gate opened wide.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GENEROUS OFFER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A GENEROUS OFFER.         Mrs. Gump (to tramp): "If you will saw up that wood for me I will give you this Christmas pudding." Tramp (a few minutes later): "Beg parding, mum, but, if it makes no difference to you, I would rather saw up the pudding and eat the wood." Forty-five persons perished in a fire which has   gutted the principal market building at Zata- cecas, Mexico.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A PETRIFIED FOREST. WEIRDNESS IN THE TRIPOLI DESERT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A PETRIFIED FOREST. WEIRDNESS IN THE TRIPOLI DESERT. The great desert in the forbidden Hinterland   of Tripoli, Northern Africa, which has not been   visited by Europeans for 50 years, has now been   explored by Mr. Edward Dodson, a young Eng-   lishman, who went out last March.   The members of the expedition experienced   much difficulty with the authorities; at one   place they were put under arrest, and on two occasions threatened by Arabs, who prepared to   ambush them.   One of the most notable things on the journey   to Murzuk was the great petrified forest. For   10 hours they travelled across an area of petri-   fied trees varying in circumference from seven   feet to a few inches. Every branch of this   forest was, of course, lying prone, and this,   together with the presence of m...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NEWEST TIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THE NEWEST TIES. Regarding ties, by far the most up-to-date tie is a flowing-ended cravat, tied very tight, and made of Macclesfield silk, on an unobtrusive ground pattern of steel grey, with colored dia- mond-shaped or round spots, rather large, here and there. Another cravat material which is a good deal worn is what is called "lace"—that is. a close net-work of black or of steel grey, with spot pattern wide apart. This is generally made in the shape of a plain, straight piece, called technically a long scarf, such as men used to wear through a ring. Next spring exactly the same thing in white hand-woven, "mercerised" cotton, which has a very agreeable look, and is not damaged by washing, will be a good deal seen, too, as soon as the dull weather is over.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MANILA ROPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

MANILA ROPE. "That was a peculiar suicide of Smithers." "How was that?" "He killed himself with the cigars his wife gave him at Christmas." "Did he hang himself?"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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