ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Indian Advocate, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
4,460 results
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate 265 with the simplicity of the dove, they soon acquired consid erable influence over the simple-minded islanders. That they were of service to the natives cannot be denied. They gave them a literature in their own language; taught them to read, write and cast accounts, to which (as a matter of course) they added a smattering of Christianity. For several years they had the field to themselves, treating the natives with kindness the better to inveigle confidence. But an event soon occurred which caused them to throw away the mask, and to show that they still inherited the persecuting princi ples of their forefathers the "pilgrims" who landed at Ply mouth Rock. In 1825 the Holy Father (Leo XII.) sent laborers to work in his vineyard three priests and three lay brothers as coad jutors. After a long voyage in a sailing ship around Cape Horn the Fathers, Messrs. Bachelot, Abraham and Short, with the brothers, arrived safely at Honolulu, July 27, 1827 Father Bachelot as...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

266 The Indian Advocate. Alarmed at the spread of Catholicism, Bingham resolved to get rid of his rivals and to crush the Mission in the bud. Accordingly, on the 24th of December, 183 1, the missioners were hurried on board a vessel and deported to California, where "the captain abandoned them without food, on a wild and barren coast!" Afterwards the islands remained for some years without a priest, though several unsuccessful attempts were made to re-establish the mission. Meanwhile, His Holiness, Pope Gregory XVI., had ap pointed Father Jerome Rouchouze, Bishop of Nelopolis, in partibus and sent him to western Polynesia, where he laid the foundation of a mission between the tropics, with Hawaii for its northern limits a mission, like so many others, founded in suffering and tears. The year 1839 opened with brighter prospects. It was the harbinger of a change in Hawaiian affairs. By treaties concluded with France and England it was stipulated that the Catholic missioners should ret...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 267 put to sea; she was never more heard of; twenty-eight Relig ious priests, brothers and sisters were lost on that occa sion. It was a sad blow to the mission. Afterwards the Polynesian mission was divided into three dioceses, and three bishops were appointed to feed a flock which was daily increasing in numbers. Hawaii fell to the lot of Father L. Maigret, the Pro-Vicar, who was consecrated Bishop of Arathea in 1846, and fixed his see at Honolulu. During his episcopate the number of Catholics rapidly in creased; they spread more and more under that of his suc cessor, Mgr. Hermann, as Bishop of Olba, who died in 1892. Towards the end of the same year our present excellent and worthy prelate, Mgr. Gulstan, was consecrated at San Fran cisco. Soon after he made the visitation of his diocese and confirmed no less than 5,000 candidates chiefly children and young people. At the present day the Catholics number about 25,000. Mgr. Gulslan, who now governs the diocese ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

268 The Indian Advocate. on Maui, for ministering to the wants of invalids. We have not been able to ascertain the exact number of churches on the islands, but they may be safely set down at between eighty and ninety. The best and most popular school on the islands, known as St. Louis College, in the city of Honolulu, contains about 500 pupils. It is under the direction of the Brothers of Mary, who have also the superintendence of flourishing schools at Wailuku and Hilo; besides these, there are also parochial schools at other places. Adjoining the Cathedral, at Hono lulu, there is a Convent of Sisters of the Sacred Heart (about twenty in number) who keep a boarding school for the edu cation of young ladies. We conclude our notice of the Missions with an extract, translated from the "Annales des Sacres Cceurs." The Very Rev. Father Leonor, who, as Provincial of the "Sandwich Islands," attended the General Chapter of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, held at Paris in 1893, gave a ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 269 charming scenery which suggest to the sea-worn traveler Paradise and the Garden of Eden. As seen from the deck of a steamer gliding rapidly along their shores, no scenery can be more picturesque their mountain tops en veloped in clouds, or perhaps in winter, wrapped in a mantle of snow; mountain slopes broken into enormous gulches, fern-clad, tree-clad, green with the richest summer foliage, and sparkling with numerous shining waterfalls and streamlets they present the most delightful picture imagi nable. Approaching nearer to the land, plantations of golden sugar-cane attract attention at one station; broad fields of velvety pasture land, dotted with cattle, transform the solitariness of another into active life; while groups of cocoanut palms skirt the white coral shores, under whose shade may be discovered, with a glass, the primitive dwellings of the simple na tives, themselves strolling on the beach, fishing in the sea or sporting in the surf. This extr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

270 The Indian Advocate. tives from the "pelting of the pitiless storm," when the "kona" wind blew loud and strong, much improvement has taken place of late years. Their rude domiciles, formerly thatched with "pili" (a kind of coarse grass) and the leaves of certain trees, have now, almost universally, given way to more sub stantial houses built of wood. Stone is plentiful enough, but owing to frequent earthquakes (especially on Hawaii) it is but little used. And also in their dress a great change has taken place since the days of Cook. The "malo" and "pau" have been discarded for the more decent clothing of civiliza tion. The loose flowing robes of the females, said to have been introduced by the wives of the Bostonian missionaries, are becoming, and are, perhaps, more suitable to the climate than any other. The Hawaiians are expert riders. When they mount a "Ho" (horse) the men ride like Jehu; and, with equal impet uosity, The xuahincs ride astraddle With their legs across the sad...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

t The Indian Advocate. 271 nutritious. In some places "taro" is also cultivated on the uplands. The population of Hawaii was estimated by Capt. Cook at 250,000; now the whole population does not exceed 90,000, of whom only some 30,000 are natives a sad decrease of what may be called "a fast dying-out race" in little more than a century 1 Sometime, Somewhere, l-.l NANSWERED yet, the prayer your lips have pleaded: I U I In agony of heart these many years? I I Does faith begin to fail? Is hope departing? And think you all in vain those falling tears? Say not the Father hath not heard your prayer; You shall have your desire sometime, somewhere. Unanswered yet? Though when you first presented This one petition at the Father's throne, It seemed you could not wait the time of asking, So urgent was your heart to make it known. Though years have passed since then, do not despair, For God will answer you sometime, somewhere. Unanswered yet? Nay, do not say ungranted Perhaps your part is not y...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

272 The Indian Advocate. The Big Church. BELONG to the Big Church," said a man yesterday when asked to what denomination he belonged. So many persons in this country are adherents of no religious organization that they far outnumber the practical members of the so-called churches. Therefore they say that they belong to "the big church," meaning to the body that has the largest numbers. The decay of faith among Protestants, the lack of religious home training, and especially the Godless system of educa tion, are largely responsible for the existence of "the big church." There is another reason for it. The same man said: "I'm not a church member because there are so many churches." He did not know which was the right one. If they were all right enough to save him, he thought that he could be right enough, by living a decent life, to be saved without them. But, indeed, there is only one Church. That is the Church founded by Jesus Christ. All other so-called churches are man-made. They ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate 273 STHB INDIAN ADVOCATkI J . H Published by the Benedictine Fathers of It . i l J! SACKED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. I A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Appro ed by our Regular Superiors. TKRMH OF SUBHCRIPTIONl Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each, . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. privixkoi:hi 1. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate n nil the merits, praers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors 4. Eery ear, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living and one fo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

274 The Indian Advocate. No one is so blind to his own faults as a man who is in the habit of detecting the faults of others. - Those who have suffered much are like those who know many languages; they nave learned to understand and be understood by all. Of 261 Catholic American journals and magazines, 85 are in foreign languages German, French, Polish, Spanish, Italian, Slavonic, Bohemian, Dutch and Indian. - The President of Switzerland, himself of our faith, has promised to attend the International Social Catholic Congress, to convene at Fribourg (Switzerland) this month. If the Catholic men of France seem to be sunk in listless apathy and are content to allow the small band of atheistic Freemasons to "run" the government of the country, the women are not. ' There is something inspiring in their recent action. The promise of local self-government in the Philippine civil government bill is now followed by the President's proc lamation of amnesty to the insurgents. This is commenda...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 275 Governor Taft has been in Rome; President Roosevelt has exchanged gifts with the Pope. Both have shown their good-will towards an understanding about the Friars in the Philippines. Our Fathers in Palestine have laid, at Jerusalem, the corner-stone of a seminary for the education of Syrian Catho lic students. On the occasion, the Pope sent a special bless ing on the work. It is believed that the time has arrived in Palestine and Syria when most of the priests should be na tives of that country. The Holy Father hopes greatly for the success of the institution. Whatever you do, or think, or say, you are constantly revealing your true self. Without intending to, you are spreading a knowledge of your character, and of your past among those with whom you mingle. You are each day un rolling a page of your life for the world to read. All, that you do makes its mark upon you, physically and mentally. You cannot, if you would, hide the story of your thoughts and acts....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

276 The Indian Advocate. If we would develop the future greatness of our commu nity our best efforts must be given to the children, for it is they who will soon assume the reins of government, and it is to them we must look for the consummation of our ideals. When we care for our schools, the great future will take care of itself. When children are imbued with high Christian principles, coupled with substantial learning, they cannot do otherwise than become good citizens, and the future pros perity and greatness of the community is assured. Let us, then, ever give our best thought to the children, for here is the power to come. - It is a bad thing to tell a lie that will do no harm to any body; very much worse to give utterance to a calumny and falsely impute to an individual or to a body of men actions or intentions that will bring them into disrepute, but the worst of all is to perpetuate that unjust lie by writing, printing and publishing it, and advertising it to the unsuspectin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 277 i production to place on the market. What, then, will he have to enjoy? Without capital, labor produces nothing; without labor, capital ceases to increase. One is necessary for the existence and well-being of the other. The man who holds the contrary is a dreamer, if not a schemer. The delegates of that convention must have been wise, learned and far seeing men when they nominated for Judges of the Supreme Court, the highest tribunal in the land or state, a cabinet maker, a barber, and a Socialist leader. That alone is enough to cause a thinking man to pause before he gives his endorse ment to a movement of the kind. The antagonism between labor and cabital is based on a misunderstanding of their relations under the present system of civilization in fact, under any democratic civilization. In the days of slavery,' the man unfortunate enough to bd a slave was not free to dispose of his labor as he saw fit. He had a master whose orders he was bound to obey, un...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

278 The Indian Advocate. other has given labor its rightful place at the board', so to speak. It is Strange that' the labor unions, Which harVevcome into existence to protect labor in its rights, have overlooked this one great element which, above all else, dignifies labor, and that capital now has no rights -over labor which are nbt freely- given by labor itself under contract and for due con sideration. ' In other words, "master and man" have disap peared, and in their place stand two free contracting parties employer and employe. "We think," says a prominent writer, "that the very essence of the relations between employer and employe is in the contract thereby explicitly or implicitly set up no matter what may be the nature of the work to be done. We are very sure that by not emphasizing this at all times the labor associations or unions have neglected the most potent force making for the increased dignity and re sponsibility of organized labor and promoting its best inter ests m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

279 Friends in the Other World. y The Indian Advocate. mf1! KING'S servant had charge of many of his master's goods on a wee island of a large kingdom. Sud denly there comes a courier of the King commanding the servant without delay to present himself before the throne and give an account of his stewardship. This man had allowed himself to slip into many -errors, and he was terribly afraid to present hisi-accdu'nts,to the King. Meanwhile he had many friends, and besought' them, weeping, to accompany him on this long journey and be his backers before the King. Some of his friends who, during his whole life, had given him the most trouble and in whom-he had placed the greatest hopes, would not stir from the spot. They only gave him a miserable old sheet to throw around him on the journey. Some other of his friends, whom he had always loved and on whom he had showered many benefits, were much grieved at his departure and accompanied him, with many tears, to the ship. But there they lef...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

280 The Indian Advocate. further, let them turn right back and see if they can guess who the servant is, who are the different classes of friends, and what shores the party finally reached. Do that honestly, please. Here is the explanation: The first of these friends are worldly goods, which man gives himself so much trouble and pains to collect and gain; for which he often risks his life, and. even his soul. These friends stay at home when his body is carried to the grave. Of all the riches, all the pomp, all the glory of this world, nothing remains but the winding-sheet. The second class of friends are his relatives. These, at tend the funeral, shedding tears, and are oppressed with, grief. But at the grave they leave him, go b,ack to their Worldly affairs, and many of them never think of him again. The truest and best friends of man are faith, hope, love, mercy, pity for the suffering and the wronged, all his noble deeds and good works. These follow us into eternity, obtain for u...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate 281 ii ajra France as a Republic, 4 t i a$ 4& F late vears a plentiful shower of leaves in the MM shape of magazine articles falls in these northern cumes. ine leaves are mostly 01 a syDiinne character, and it may be truly said of the votaries thereof, "inconsulti abcunt" not being consulted, they go their way. Although the sybil, even as many ladies of modern times, was extremely negligent in ar ranging her affairs, still a stray leaf from her scat tered journal was occasionally blown into a shel tered spot where it lay snugly ensconced until picked up by a Horace or a Virgil. Thus may I hope that this stray leaf of mine will not be blown about in any ill-natured gale of criti cism, but will flutter gently to the shelter of some kind, en couraging intelligence. When we look out upon the different orders of under standing in these latter days it would appear that one fact should be patent to the most ordinary among them, namely, that republicanism, or the sys...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

282 The Indian Advocate. tions will find in the "liberty, fraternity, equality" of repub lican institutions the highest guarantee for their greatest ad vancement. In all of this they ignore the will of God and His designs in His own world; for He has neither revealed any one form of government is more particularly acceptable to Him than others are, nor has it seemed good in His sight to form all national characters on the monotonous pattern system. A distinctive and diversified harmony is the harmony of God, just as we see it exemplified in the variety and com plications of Nature herself. The genius of the French people is peculiarly disposed to the monarchial form of government, this being the form best suited to the fostering of military ardor. The pomp and cir cumstance of war have ever been specially dear to the fickle, mercurial brilliant Gallic race. Nay, even the very republic (which is supposed to be "peace") finds it necessary to pan der to the passion of Gallic militarism...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 283 at the marvelous recuperative power of France in paying, and after paying, one of the most gigantic war indemnities that any nation ever was forced to give another. He who would claim that the monarchy was an unmixed blessing to France should be laughed at for his pains. What human system of any kind is an unmixed blessing? But, at least, the mon archy made France a nation. The monarchy fostered learn ing and the arts. The monarchy made France, if not the greatest, the most stable, the most admirable, certainly the most brilliant of the great powers of Europe. For France, the republic has spelled decay and disintegration. No other country of the Old World has had anyihing like so many changes of government within one century as France has seen. It is enough to merely mention the names of Charles X, of Louis Philippe, of Lamartine, of Thiers, of Gambetta to say nothing of the Hundred Days and the Three Days and the barricades and, with blue lights and music n...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

284 The Indian Advocate. themselves, and they have shown the world again and again that they do not know the meaning of a free commonwealth. Heaven knows they have been long enough apprentices at the trade of framing a constitution, but they are only tyros still, and bid fair to remain so until the Greek Kalends! The pre dominance of Paris was a curse to the old French monarchy, and is a standing menace to the present republic. The power that was once a queen on the European chessboard is becom ing a mere pawn, to be moved hither and yon in the hands of unscrupulous players. ' When the throne is restored to the fair land of Saint Louis; when the preposterous military establishment main tained by the present government is reduced to the limits of reasonable need; when the Eldest Daughter of the Church takes again her place in the councils of princes, the historian of the future will proclaim that the republic was destroyed and the monarchy restored by the most distinctively popular m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
x
Loading...
x
x