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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

THE SHARPLES Farm and Factory Cream Separators They produce a cream unequaled in quality. Jf^l&r They will get more butter out of the milk than can S\S*f otherwise be obtained. /^P!OI hi durability and light cost of repairs they have no -^S^^M^^ hi ease of management and reliability they excel. ftpl They have greater actual capacity in proportion to WSh first cost than any other. Mm&L^ Their record in actual use has proven them the yggMj igE> safest of all separators. 8^ They Handle Cream as Nature Intended. THEY DO NOT Draw it over edges of discs or interior contrivances. THEY DO NOT Wire draw the cream through a hole in a screw. They deliver it over our smooth cream lip, insuring a smooth, solid cream in best possible condition for any purpose. Capacities range from 300 pounds per hour to 6000 pounds per hour Send for catalogue. Branches: p. M- SHARPLES, • ISS&Si Westcheste,, Pa. ; St. Paul, Minn. G. W. KNEIB, Dubuque, Iowa. Special Pacific Coast Agent, Omaha, Neb. ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

RANCH AND RANGE Vol. 4 No. SO POWER OF ORGANIZATION. BY HON. W. I). HOAKD. The Farmers' National Congress is needed as an organized body of opinion to promote as Dest it can, National Legislation in support of the Depart ment of Agriculture. Our present and sagacious Secretary of Agriculture is doing what he can to introduce Ameri can food products in foreign markets and promote their consumption. That department should have the authority and means to employ, under its own direction, commercial agents in every food market in the world. Denmark sends its agents to England to receive, guard and look alter its shipments of butter and bacon. Canada is doing the same. There is no reason on earth better than traditional abstraction, why the United States should not show the same good business sense. Besides, there is a great trade await ing us at our very doors in the sister republics of the southern part of this continent. Can we say or do anything here which will move our National Legis...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

2 REPLY TO STEVENS. BY I'KOF. THOMAS SHAW IN BRFEDEB'S GAZETTE. I In your issue of January 25 is an ar ticle from the pen of Mr. Adam M. Ste vens which merits some notice for the reason that it is misleading from the beginning to the end. It is mislead ing first, inasmuch as it argues on the assumption that I am opposed to high est attainments in the special-purpose 3ow. Second, it assumes that lam en couraging the average farmer to be content with low attainment in milk production in the dual-purpose cow. Third, it seizes upon figures which I ?ave as representing some very moder ate returns in milk a.id meat, and ar gues as though I considered them max imum returns, and then it goes on to draw a comparison between them and maximum returns from certain dairy herds that have been brought to a high degree of perfection by careful breed ing and selection. Fourth, it assumes that this controversy is to be settled by a comparison of returns in dairy production from the special-purpose co...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

FROM FARMER'S STANDPOINT. The Farmer Should Buy Where He Can Get the Most for His Money. BY JOS. L. EKWIN OF THE KPITOMIST. Whenever a wholesale dealer in dry goods or groceries sends an agent out among the farmers, great is the cry raised by the merchants of the! neigh boring towns against them. The local papers write warning editorials catt ing attention to the frauds perpetrated on some guileless farmer by "sharps," and advising the farmers to kick all agents whatsoever off their farms. Those inside the newspaper lines know this is, if not actually paid fo ■ at so much per line, a bid for the patronage of the merchants in advertising in the columns of the home paper. The ed itor believes in home patronage, too, and for the same reason as the mer chant; it is to his interest. But is it really to the farmer's interest 7 HOME PATRONAGE. When it comes to buying the farm er's produce, how much does the mer chant practice "home patronage?" Just so long as it pays him to do so. He does ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

h NEW DAIKY LAW. Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Washington: . Section 1. Section lof said amend ment amending section 2 of said act is i hereby amended to read as follows: ("Section 2. In all prosecutions or other proceedings under this or any ,other law of this state, relating to the sale or furnishing of milk, if it shall ,be proven that the milk sold or offered i for sale, or furnished or delivered, or .had in possession with intent to sell or offer for sale, or to furnish and de liver, as aforesaid, as pure, wholesome ,or unskimmed milk, contain less than j3 per centum of pure butter fat, or less :than 8 per centum of milk solidr other , than fat, when subjected to chemical analysis or other satisfactory tests, or jthat it, or any part of it, was drawn ( from the cows known by the person I complained, to have been within 15 I days before, or four days after parturi tion, or to have any disease or ulcers, or other running sores, then and in either case, the said...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

than $100 for each and every offense. Sec. 27. No person shall sel! or of fer for sale any cream taken from im pure or diseased milk or cream that contains less than 18 per centum of pure butter fat. Whoever violates the provisions of this section shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be pun ished by a fine of not iess than $25 nor more than $100 or by imprisonment for not less than one month nor more than six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment. Sec. 28. Every person who conveys milk in carriages, carts or otherwise for the purpose of sel.'ing the came in any city or town of 1000 inhabitants or more in the state of Washington shall annually on the first day of June, or within 30 days after, be licesed by the state dairy commissioner to sal 1 milk within 30 days after, bt licensed by i!i • and shall pay to the said dairy com missioner the sum of $1 each to be used as provided for in section 31. Li censes shall be used only in the names o...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

I THE FRUIT PEST DESTROYER. I BY PROF. C. V. PIPEB, ENTOMOLOGIST WASHINGTON AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE AND SCHOOL OF SCIENCE. The following shows the analysis of ' a sample of the Pacific Coast Fruit Pest Destroyer submitted by Frank L. 1 Wheeler to the chemist of this college: Sulphur 75.63 | Copper sulphate (Cv S 0-4) 9.80 Organic or volatile matter 7.00 ! Calcium phosphate (Ca-3 P-2 0-8) 3.69 I Moisture 3.35 Loss and undetermined 53 100.00 Organic and volatile matter is com- I posed in part of the carbon found in , ordinary bone black and in part of j charcoal (wood). A very little sul , phur is also included. I Analysis by Heileman. Elton Fulmlr, Professor of Chemistry. I In his letter Mr. Wheeler states that i the above "Fruit Pest Destroyer" was i sent him by the secretary of the Fruit 1 Pest Destroyer Co., Mount Vernon, I Wash. The package was forwarded to us un opened. The above analysis alone is sufficient to condemn the "Fruit Pest Destroyer" and comment on it is almost needless...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

Even in still weaker solutions this sub stance retarded growth greatly. Ex periments with a great list of different substances gave very similar results. In view of these facts there can be scarcely a doubt that the copper sul phate would cause serious damage to the apple tree long before it couM pos sibly affect the fungus parasites Even such an amount of the copper sulphate would in all probability not restrain scale insects or aphides in any appre ciable degree, as the copper salts are very slow poisons to insect life. The two difficulties pointed out, namely, the impossibility of keeping the substance in the tree, and more particularly the danger to the tree it self, which would be greater were more active poisons used, make it exceed ingly improbable that any remedy of this kind will ever be discovered. It would be going too far to say that such a discovery is not possible. In the cases of certain bacterial diseases of man and of the lower animals, we use just such remedies. Bu...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

* Ranch and Range \\ itli which is consolidated 'THE WASHINGTON FARMER, THE PACIFIC COAST DAIRYMAN, 'THE FARMER AND TURFMAN. | Freeman & Freeman, Publishers. I Under the editorial and business mintKettent of MILLER FKKKMAN. Traveling Reprweatathra and Corresp^i'dent, LEtJII K. FREEMAN. | , ' Editorial Offices, - • Seattle, Wash. [Telephone uriwn tun. Long distance connection BUSINESS OFFICES j Seattle, - - - 315-316 Pioneer Building. I Spokane, - Suite F llypotheekbank Building. I Subscription in advance, $1.00 ■ er year. : Address all communications to RANCH AND 1 RANGE, 315-31G Pioneer Huilding, Seattle, Wash. ! IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT. Ranch and Range has this week ab sorbed by consolidation: i Freeman's Farmer. The Farmer and Turfman. The Pacific Coast Dairyman. The Washington Farmer. All subscription accounts and adver tising contracts will be carried out by . Ranch and Range. All moneys due these publications by I subscribers and advertisers arc made I payable to Ranch and ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

WARBLES. In the early spring of each year in nearly every part of this country cattle are affected with a pest known as "warbles," which not only causes great annoyance and suffering, but interfere very seriously with health, thrift and improvement of condition, says the In diana Farmer. All classes of cattle are alike subject to the attack; dairy cows and beef animals both meet the same fate. Warbles are caused by the gad fly towards the latter end of the previous summer, while the cattle are at pas ture; this fly alights on the back of the animal, pierces the skin and depos its its eggs underneath it. After sev eral weeks the eggs hatch under :ne warm skin and a tumor or lump is thus formed which partially opens at Ihe top after having attained t'n size of a small nutmeg. By this time a grub or larvae has occupied the space within the tumor and the small open ing at the top suffices for providing air and life. The grub then feeds on its surround ings and grows to a considerable si...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

10 BLACK LEG. We notice with much pleasure that the Pasteur Vaccine Company, whose headquarters are at No. 51 Fifth av enue, Chicago, are now actively intro ducing their Black Leg Vaccine to the stock owners in this part of the coun try. This vaccine is a preventive rem edy for black leg and was discovered about 14 years ago. Live stock vao cination is very extensively and suc cessfully practiced on the othe" side ot the Atlantic, and since its introduc tion into America by the Pasteur Vac cine Company in 1895 its progress and success have been phenomenal. As far west as Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico, Pasteur Vaccine is now used as a matter of course in all localities where the stockraiser& had formerly experienced losses frou; black leg. In the 13 Central Western cattle raising states about 500,000 head of young cattle were last year success fully treated with Papteur Black Leg Vaccine —all being located in districts where black leg was quite troublesome and where t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

FROM FRIEND CONANT. Editor Ranch and Range: Repre sentative Sharp will "Pc the daily bill through all right. He is a worker; and R. B. Willson (little tug) won't be lagging in the rear; that is rot his place. But that wide tire law. No! Let ev ery man make his own law in such matters. You might as well say what kind of harvesters and mowers we should use. Oh, no, let men use their reason and choose such as is best suit ed to their uses and surroundings. The various business pursuits of men and the great difference in the land to be traversed must be taken into account and no strait-jacket la-v will apply. The main thing in roads is to run the water away from them so it will not seep into the roadbed In Hoard's Dairyman is an article headed "A Mystery" and telling how some patrons of a creamery get 83 cents per 100 pounds of milk, while others got more —some $1.03. The cows were all about on a par. Now the ed itor and an lowa man write all around the subject and don't hit the nail at...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

12 A DRUMMERS EXPERIENOE. "There is a slang expression about being too fresh," said the drummer, as ihe lighted his cigar. "I have adopted that expression and written it at the head of every page of my note book, so that it will be constantly before me. "Last fall I changed cars at a little junction in the northern part of the state. It is a dreary spot, and the trains never connect within three i hours of each other. Finding: time i hanging heavily on my hands 1 wan |dered over to an orchard near by, where there was some tempting look .ing fruit. I was so busily engaged in [throwing stones at a luscious looking i apple in the top of one of the trees that I did not notice an old farmer bearing i down where I was with blood in his eye. When I discovered him it was I too late to flee, so 1 concluded to face , it out. " 'Fine orchard you've got here,' said 1, opening on him before he had a chance to get in the first word. 'It will be a pity to spoil it by running a rail road through it...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

CRITICISM ON PRUNES The following letter, directed to S. L. Moore, accompanied a box of prunes specially packed by Duff & Sons of Philadelphia, Pa., which was sent out and exhibited at the recent Northwest Fruitgrowers' Convention. It contains a number of valuable suggestions to the pruneraisers of the Northwest: "I may say in regard to this box of prunes that we have not selected the largest, but have packed it from fruit as it runs. This is sent simply to show how it should bp packed "The quality of last year's crop of Italian prunes has ben excellent, but has not shown to advantage, ov/ing to the very indifferent manner in which drying and packing has been done at points of shipment. This has been caused either by carelessness or want of proper knowledge. "Much of the fruit has arrived show- THE BEST There is only one BEST COLOR on the market. That is \~~ZI^M' EllSt^ I _i Wells, Richardson & Co. | i' [Improved gutter Qolor Egij* i IHIIIgJI UVCU ||pj|llillCl IgUJIIJI W^»*|...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

14 IOWA'S DAIKY INDUSTRY. In his twelfth annual report the dairy Commissioner of lowa shows the cost of manufacturing butter at cream eries of different classes, not including the hauling of the milk and cream. Creameries receiving not more than 1,250,000 pound of milk report the cost as rangin from 1.5 cents to 7 cents per pound, the average being 3 cents. Those receiving not more than 2,250, --1.25 cents to 4.5 cents, the average be ing 2.42 cents. In creameries rot re ceived more than 3,500,000 pounds of mmilk the cost is from 1.25 cents to 4 cents, the average being 2.2 cents, pounds of milk the cost is from 1 to 4 cents, the average being 1.7 cents per pound. In gathered cream creameries making less than 150,000 pounds of butter the cost is from 1.5 cents to 4 cents, with an average of 2.93 cents, and in those making more than 150,00.J pounds the cost per pound is from 1.2b cents to 3.84 cents, the average being 2.33 cents. Th total number of creameries and J«^^^ I\.lll LIIC Lj...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

SEEDS GROWN IN STATE OF WASHINGTON Pride of Washington Peas, Blue Im perial, American, Alpha and Marrow fat; "All Seasons" Cabbage, Salsify, Shepard Radish, Hanson and Salaman der Lettuce, Coffee Pea, staple varieties Beans, Russian and White Sunflower. J. W. B. DAHLL, Waterville, Wn The Separator Hff^B Is not only the best V _7 ,1U for the money, but ts. PlC'jr It Is the best that can \\ -f~-f/ML be made at any L ljLOi!mj\.i^ price. You need not i, ~ jsr IFj H^ taKe onr word for it #t3Jß^# » ask any user; or ■( i flgSMf Jl better still, we'will mB BUtfk^w put one In your V| L^yfl\fA dairy and prove by \ actual work every ft9l!GSr\\ claim we make for eIHBiM \\ it. Our catalogne is Wk iHHW \\ free. Address jCilSir FRED REDIQ, Seattle, Wash. Printed Parchment -:- i -:- BUTTER PAPER CREAMERYMEN are urged to write us for .-:-'., -:- . figures and samples -:- Catalogs : Pkicklists of Nurserymen ,;,,■.-.•;• ■ Stockmen, etc., a specialty -:- Stationery. in All Lines -:- The CALVERT CO. Sea...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

16 MAKING A HOTBED. To make a stationery hotbed dig a pit about 2'o feet deep, board up the sides and ends to about one foot above ground at the back and three inches above in front. The width and length vary according to the number or sizes of the sashes to be used, slides being placed across in the case of the cold frame, that the sashes may be moved to give air. Into this pit place leaves or coarse litter to the depth of one foot and fermenting stable manure to the depth of one-half foot, this being trod den down quite firmly and then cov ered with from three to six inches of soil. Be sure that the manure is trod den in firmly at the sides and corners or it will sink unevenly. The manure is usually too coarse and it gives too rank a heat when it first comes from the stables; it should be thrown in a pile and worked over several times be fore using. The bed should stand two or three days after making before planting to allow the strong heat to subside. Another style generally call...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

OAK HILL =:= STOCK FARM C. E. LADD, proprietor. SHORTHORN CATTLE, SHROPSHIRE, COTSWOLD AND SOUTHDOWN SHEEP Have now for sale some grand young bulls and heifers at rea sonable prices, and a number of flue Southdowu and Cotswold bucks. Address, FRANK BROWN, manager, North Yamhill, Oregon. We are in the market for -: APPLES :- Car lots or less. .SEATTLE COMMISSION C 0... Office and Warehouse, Columbia Street Dock, Seattle. It beats the Klondike when yon can store butter Eggs and Cheese with the SEATTLE AUTOMATIC REFRIGERATOR COMPANY and get 50 per cent In advance In price In ninety days. Try It when you have goods to store FOR SALE Pure Bred and Grade Jersey Cows and Heifers All of splendid breeding and fine milk strain, and all fresh. SWEENEY BROS., Friday Harbor, Wash. BREEDER OF jp**^^v Ohio Improved JiiliiiifP CHESTER WHITE SWINE The heading, Quickest Maturing, Least Susceptible to Disease J. M. Newman, Thorp, Wash. Balfour, QutHrie & Co. 220-221 Bailey Building, Seattle Grain ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 March 1899

A Few More Prize Winners W. I. Noras. Moland, Minn., Silver medal at Omaha Exposition. Wai. Petebman, Waconia, Minn., Silver medal at Omaha Exposition. W. C. Lawson, Geneva, Minn., Silver medal at Omaha Exposition. C. J. Bangs, Blame, Minn., Silver medal at Omaha Exposition. Meriden Creamery Co., Meriden, Kan., Silver medal at Omaha Exposition. Meriden Creamery Co., McLouth Falls, Kan., Silver medal, Omaha Exposition. Wahoo Creamery Co., Wahoo, Neb., Silver medal at Omaha Exposition. A. B. Olander, Oakland, Neb., Silver medal at Omaha Exposition. E. J. Armsberger, Bear Valley, Wis., Silver medal at Omaha Exposition. Jas. Haugan, Palmer, Wis., First Prize Minnesota State Fair 1898. J. J. Lorentzen. New Richland, Minn., Second Prize Minn. State Fair 1898. .Jas. P. Ibsen. Hanson, S. D., First Prize State Fair, South Lakota 1898. IT. P. Nielson. Brayton, lowa, First Prize Waterloo Convention, 1898. wto. Thou.m, Fallow, lowa, Second Prize, Waterloo Convention, 1898. Haugdahl. New Sweden,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 9 March 1899

gAhCH And Range Jj^ «tff' ISSUED EVERY WEEK fjSr Vol. 4, No. 51 I Two of a Kind I INg The "Hollow Bowl" has commenced to rumble loudly in this section of the country. It has probably ceased to find ||i 111 a profitable field elsewhere, so, like the "low" in the Weather Bureau Report, it has moved westward and now envelopes ||| ifel the Pacific Coast with "storm centers" at San Francisco and Seattle. So far as power machines are concerned, it will Sjj Ifl . find "conditions very unsettled" for any permanent stay, for the very potent reason that creamery operators are too wide pg ||1 awake and well posted on the experience of others to invest in such butter-fat wasting machines. We understand that |*j| §H the "triple current" bowl is no longer put into power machines, in other words, that the manufacturers have ceased to |3a Imake a power size machine. The "bowl that alone revolves" is also getting its share. These two are of a kind. The ||j| Creamery men in the East cannot be induced...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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