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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Making Joss Stick. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Making Joss Stick. The composition of candles called joss sticks, which are used in all the religious ceremonies of Buddhism, has long remained a mystery, the preparation of the sticks being Intrusted to certain persons chosen from a limited class. Not long ago, however, there was learned the rmumer of making joss sticks in Indo-China. A stem of bamboo is rolled in a preparation containing 14 different odoriferous drugs, two of which are significant, as showing a knowledge of chemical and physical properties. /These are aconite, which serves to protect the sticks against the attacks of rats and mice, and camphor, which causes them to burn steadily without being periodically extinguished.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Duke, by the Hour, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Duke, by the Hour, In Concord, Mass., there used to be a liveryman who rented horses for trips around the, town, ail his horses except one. Duke Invariably was rented by the hour. One day, when the liveryman was about to retire on a good-sized competence, he explained; “Duke.” he said, “illustrates the possibility of visible motion without highly visible progress.” It slumld be understood that the liveryman dated back to the day of the Concord school of philosophy. “Duke,” he explained, “makes no money by the trip, but by the hour . . . well, Duke when in good form can trot for five minutes In the shade of a tree.”

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
GIANT TREES OF AUSTRALIA Exceed in Height, Though Not in Circumference, the Famous Grand Conifers AJaliforrrta. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

GIANT TREES OF AUSTRALIA Exceed in Height, Though Not in Circumference, the Famous Grand Conifers AJaliforrrta. In the book, “Under the Southern Cross,” written by Maturin M. Ballou, an American traveler, in the ’Bos of the last century, we read of his estimate of the great trees of Australia, according to the Christian Science Monitor. “It is in this colony of Australia that the traveler finds the giant trees, considered to be one of the great wonders of our times, and which exceed In dimensions those grand conifers of California in which Americans feel such pride. These big trees of Victoria are called the mountain ash, though why so named we do not understand, as they are not of that family. But they are certainly the tallest trees in the known world, often measuring 400 feet and more In height, and from fifty to sixty feet in girth a couple of yards from the ground. When we say that these trees exceed in dimensions those of California we refer especially to their height "inasmuc...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
TALKED WITH MONKEY “KING" Buddhist Disciple Was Positive That the Animal Understood Speech ■ He Addressed to Him. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

TALKED WITH MONKEY “KING" Buddhist Disciple Was Positive That the Animal Understood Speech ■ He Addressed to Him. A third degree disciple of Buddha who halls from the famous Yellow mountains fHuang Shan) says they are the home of tigers, wildcats, wild horses, goats, boars and an animal resembling a panther, with bristly hair and Impervious skin—and monkeys. The monkeys he divided into two classes, one the ordinary brown monkey with a tall, the other white breasted and white faced, with a gray back and but little smaller than a man. He intimated that this type manifested a degree of intelligence when spoken to, very much resembled man, and was tailless. To this second class belongs what he called “the Great White Monkey King.” ruler of all the beasts of the mountains, and described as being more than twenty feet tall, with arms ten feet long, four tusks each at least a foot long, a face and eyes proportionately large, and a voice that made the earth tremble whenever it spoke. He sai...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
GREED WORSE THAN POVERTY Former Always Fruitful of Evil, While the Latter Is Often Incentive to Thrift. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

GREED WORSE THAN POVERTY Former Always Fruitful of Evil, While the Latter Is Often Incentive to Thrift. The fear of poverty is not in itself a bad thing, writes Dr. Charles Aubrey Eaton in Leslie’s. It may become the mother of thrift. It acts as a spur to endeavor, and some men, like some horses, do their best under the spur. Poverty is not always an unmixed evil. In fact, It is .and has been looked upon as one of the distinctly Christian virtues, although there seems to be rather a feeble desire to practice this •particular grace. Greed, on the other hand, is always bad. It is plainly the outcropping of the hog in human nature. It is the fear of poverty run amuck. It is illustrated by the drunkard who often had too much but never got enough. Greed is at the bottom of most of our troubles today and has been equally fruitful of evil in every age and among every class. We can never come to permanent social peace while the fear of poverty embitters one-half the people and greed drives ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Japanese Marriage Customs. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Japanese Marriage Customs. Marriages in Japan are generally Wrought about by older married couples who act as go-betweens. There is a popular saying that everyone should act is a go-between at least three times. The go-betweep, knowing a young man and woman whom he regards as suitable to each other, proposes the match confidentially to the parents of both. If preliminary reports are mutually satisfactory to the two families, a meeting of the young couple and their parents and relatives fs arranged on neutral ground. Any intimation of the real purpose of this meeting is tactfully avoided at the time, though the purpose of it is, of course, fully understood by all concerned. Under this arrangement either family may, without giving offense, drop the matter after the first meeting, but if the results of the preliminary inspection are satisfactory to both sides, the parents meet again and definitely arrange the match, which is made binding by an exchange of presents.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Few Japanese Marry for Love. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Few Japanese Marry for Love. The Orient and the Occident are nowhere farther apart than in their views and customs as to the mating of men and women, according to Julian Street in McClure’s. In Japan marriages for love rarely occur, though it is said that the tendency of young people to marry to suit themselves is growing. Young Japanese girls often look with envy upon women of other nations where marriage for love is the general rule. Probably they suppose such matches are invariably happy; that the love Is always real love, and that it endures forever. No doubt the Occidental system, viewed from afar, looks as rosy to ,a Japanese girl as their system looks appalling to ah American girl.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Not in His Calendar, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Not in His Calendar, Little Dickie is an Episcopalian, and therefore accustomed to celebrating many church holidays. The other day he stood looking at the signs in the window of a closed drug store. He was thirsty, very thirsty, and longed for Monday to come when he might invest in something cool. Laboriously he spelled out the sign. “N-u-t S-u-n-d-a-y.” His countenance assumed a look of disgust. “Well,” he ejaculated, “I’ve heard oi Ash Wednesday, Shrove Tuesday and Good Friday, but to have the drug store closed ’cause >+ ’s Nut Sunday is a new one on me. There’s no collich for that day in the church book.”

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
SAYS FEW READ THE BIBLE Writer Criticises the Present Generation for Its Lack of Knowledge of the Scriptures. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

SAYS FEW READ THE BIBLE Writer Criticises the Present Generation for Its Lack of Knowledge of the Scriptures. The bookseller’s story of the woman who demanded to know where in the Bible she could find the story of Damon and Pythias is called to mind by the recently reported attempt of a professor at tlie university to measure the Biblical knowledge of his class in English literature. The test resulted in a rather naive display of ignorance concerning a book which lias been called “tiie fountain head of English literature,” and which, witli Shakespeare, Invariably heads the list of “best” books and gathers more dust than any other. There are those who, havin'; made acquaintance with tln> Bible in their own youth, and realizing its poetry, history and style, agree with Prof. Dallas Lore Sharp that we are a “Biblestarved nation.” What parent reads the Bible to or with the children these days? They get fairy stories or animal fables. Even the Sunday-school lessons are given f...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
HAD REHEARSAL OF FUNERAL Curious Notion Held by Spanish Monarchy Concerning in Which He Wouid Figure. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

HAD REHEARSAL OF FUNERAL Curious Notion Held by Spanish Monarchy Concerning in Which He Wouid Figure. Charles V, king of Spain and emperor of Germany in the Sixteenth century, was a pious ruler. Toward the end of his life he conceived the curious idea of rehearsing his own funeral, not because he Wished to have the event go off without a hitch when the time should come, but because he thought the performance of the ceremony would redound to the credit and wellbeing of his soul in the after-world. His friends sought to dissuade him, but, deeming it a holy act, the ruler went ahead with his preparations. A catafalque was erected and the service performed. The high altar, the catafalque, and the entire church shone with wax lights; the friars were all in their proper places and the household of the emperor attended in deep mourning. “The pious monarch himself was there, attired in sable weeds,” according to the monkish historian, “and bearing a taper, to see himself interred and to cel...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Sheep Driven to Mountains, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Sheep Driven to Mountains, V£ild sheep live in small flocks in rocky, mountainous parts where food is sparse. Had they been possessed of such means of defense as the heels arid the speed of the horse, or the horns and the strength of the bison they would probably have congregated on the plains where food was plentiful. As it was, their only protection from their natural enemies, the wolves, lay in their agility in the most inaccessible spots. The length of time sheep have been domesticated is as nothing compared with the preceding ages when their home was in the mountains, consequently coming under the dominion of man has utterly reversed their conditions of life. So the growth of the hoof is out of all proportion to the wear on our soft pastures, and footrot supervenes. Similarly the thick coating of wool which was absolutely necessary at the altitudes the wild sheep inhabited, has, as far as the sheep itself is concerned, become a nuisance, and rendered it a prey to ticks and magg...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Hew to Enjoy Walk [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Hew to Enjoy Walk There are road walkers, trail followers, forest reamers—locality and scenery are matters of taste. The thing is to keep marching, to fill one’s lungs with draughts of invigorating air, to banish care and to revel in high spirits. There should he a stop at every spring, the colder and shyer the better, and when a landscape is to be viewed, some scene that charms and inspires, it is a sacrilege if tlu> walker does not throw himself down on the grass, or seat himself on a fallen tree, to spend- a few minutes feasting ids eyes on the picture. 'The,true walker Is not one who merely puts miles behind him. to vaunt his speed and endurance.—Exchange.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Origin of Languages [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Origin of Languages Authorities believe that all languages had their origin in the dialect j of one common language whose home |is conjectured to have been be- ! tween the Baltic and Caspian seas. | The language spread with migrations in different! places, and separation and race admixture increased the differences in the dialects until they became distinct languages, which in turn | spread and broke up into dialects.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
IN TIGHT CORNER Trapper Tells How It Feels to Be Trapped. Bear Hunter Experienced Uncomfortable Night in Snare He Had Prepared for Ferocious Old Grizzly. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

IN TIGHT CORNER Trapper Tells How It Feels to Be Trapped. \ Bear Hunter Experienced Uncomfortable Night in Snare He Had Prepared for Ferocious Old Grizzly. “Old Mose” was one of the most ferocious bears in the Rockies. He was a notorious “bad actor,” according to Mr. A. L. Corson in the Wide World Magazine, and foiled all attempts to shoot or trap him. Indeed, he seemed to have a charmed life. On one occasion a man named Hancock dried to *rap him. In placing : the bait inside the trap, Hancock ac- | cidentally touched the trigger, and the j logs came down and imprisoned him. He tried to pry the heavy timbers I apart, but found that lie could not | shift them an inch. From one side of ■ the trap to the other he went, uncoil* j sciously imitating the movements j Bruin would have made in hunting for a weak point. All his efforts were fruitless. The pangs of hunger were now coming on, and night was near. Hancock scraped up some chips and twigs, made a fire and roasted part of the deer t...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Had Feared the Worst. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Had Feared the Worst. It is a sad thing to have to rel ite, but Mr. Spongedry came home the oilier night “wet.” Not externally, hut internally; he had drunk wine or its or beer! .... With uncertain footsteps he the stairs, with itchy, nervous he unclothed himself, with swimtnin head he lay down in his bed. Mrs. Spongedry had, however, his anti-catlike tread. M Thinking to frighten him, she (H| ered her head with a sheet preached his bed. |B| Spongedry sat up in bed and in wonder at the spook. “Who is that?” he asked. “I am a ghost!” came the from the sheet. “oil. that's all right, then: did give me a fright! I thou«t:'|^| 1 .■ i

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
V r [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

V r Mr. T. had visiu-d q:-li tha^H o-roag -Hi riil; mv hut v -'' mHBBB ; < a stillicl, jB " ‘ ' ’ ' ' UM-i - . - ■■ Id id a! it I:.- shivered cHfIfIBBHI ••• • ; the 1 ' ’ M \\ Tin:; 1\ i: .-am,, the gin lit- siiivvi :i tiieh -<• '<•■!.!<> -■ “h.-: :y. ■'it ■' i 1 ■ 11di -> fur ,i .H ..g'ffiaSfai

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
New Idea fnr [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

New Idea f nr A;; -i ;!i .!. 1 l;i mian umß Afr ; 'j <' Jf| „n ' ' « ''■' ■tSg.f am * head, it is raeH he 'cs| ••"CV - _ v: >'s J^ k

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921
Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

IGA 1 lay in lueSday lith At- & ey, va. Va. nterey, er of ►Sur veycllonte- . faupt. of lb. Crab pt. of Schcj, High 'f . i, A NERVOUS WOMAN Huntersville, W. Va. —“After I got over the inlluenza last spring I was all run down and suffered from functional disturbances. I suffered with bearing pains and was so nervous I felt as if I would go to pieces. Mybreath was so short that I could not walk up hill at all or hardly walk upstairs. Having used Dr. Pierce’s Favorite Prescription with good results when I came into womanhood, I decided to try it again. I have taken threw bottles and am feeling line.”— SIRS. NELLIE J. BUSCH. law. Comm finer of ■orey, Va. fo* * i:bS jJIS 1.1'.. 1 DENTAL NOTICE Dr. Okas. S. Kramer and E. G. Heroic! DENTISTS liar]inton, - W. Va. We are prepared to do all kinds of dental work at prices consistent with cost of materials and high class efficient work. All work guarDR. I. C. WAGNER DENTIST OiTli dnd floor - Masonic Temple MONTEREY, VIRGINIA / r UMBE...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

COLONEL THOMPSON U HARDING C’-iiINET 0 MM 10*3^ i V*|i ;|&v '■' . \t« \Wm ** / n P ft There's to be romance tn the Harding cabinet, according to reports from high Republican sources It is to be the naming of Colonel William lioyce Thompson by President-elect Harding to one of the portfolios Colonel Thompson is a westerner He was born in Montana, educated in Columbia School ot Mines, made a huge fortune tn copper—then went to war in the Spanlsh-Amencan conflict, becom ing colonel through service Thompson now has vas’ financial interests in New York and it was he who gave a million dollars to Red Cross during Hu war besiv’e serving 18 months in Russia 4 the head of Red Cross And it * is Colonel Thompson who conceived the idea and saw to it that American boys tn the trenches received th tr home town paper Over bad big mailing l«»i>. for "over there." He is considered one of the brainip** men in America ">day

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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