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Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And Sou... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,937 items from Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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"A POOR HONEYMOON" [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

" A POOR TIONKYMOON" In Belfast Police Court, Annie Sinllh (alias Donaghy) was fined 10/ for hav ing been drunk and disorderly. In the hearing of the case a man crime for ward and told the court that lie mar ried the prisoner on the previous Mon day. "We were going along the street," he said, "when a woman came up and hit her. She was arrested. It's a pnor honeymoon that." It transpired that tlio woman had lieen sixty-one times beforo. the court.

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHILDREN'S NAMES ABORIGINAL SOURCE. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

CHILDREN'S NAMES ABORIGINAL SOURCE. Mr Culemun P. Hyman (Royal Colonial Institute) writes to the "Ob server" (London) on November 13 as follows:— With reference to Mr J. Landfear Lucas's letter in this week's "Obser ver." thnrc is at least one other native Australasian name in the Peerage. "When Lord and Lady Carrington (now the Marquis and Marchioness cf Lincolnshire) were the occupants of Government House, Sydney, New South "Wales, they named an infant daughter (now the Viscountess Bury) Judith Sydney Myoe. Tne last name is pure ly aboriginal, and, if I remember /ight ly, signifies "native born." Another Peer's sojourn as Governor of an Australian State (Victoria) is brought to mind by the name of one of the sons of the late Marquis of Linlith gow (then the Earl of Hopetoun), that son having been named Melbourne.

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DIPLOMATIC CHANGES CHINESE GOES TO LONDON [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

DIPLOMATIC CHANGES CHINESE GOES TO LONDON According to the "Pekln Daily News" approaching? diplomatic chancres will include the appointment of Mr Ten Hui-ching as Chinese Minister in Lon don (says the *'DaiIv News.") The native Press adds that at the same time it is proposed to raise the Lega tion in London to the rank of an Em bassy. The new Minister, better l<nown as Dr. "\V. ~\V. Yen, was educated in Ame rica and held the position of Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs in the rirst Republican Government in 1912. He is now Chinese Minister at Berlin. The envoys charged with conveying to foreign Powers acknowledgments of their recognition of the Chinese Repub lic have now fjeen appointed, and Mr Wen Tsung-yao has been selected to proceed to London on this mission. Mr "Wen, like Dr. Yen, was educated in America, and played a conspicuous part in the Revolution, becoming Commis sioner of Trade and Foreign Affairs in Shanghai on the establishment of the Republic. A further not...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER II. A Mother Pays. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

CHAPTER II. A Mother Pays. Pleading fatigue to Netta, he went upstairs and locked himself in _ his room. There, with clcnched fists and panting breath, lie asked himself how justice could be done—to himself, to Netta, and, with as much mercy as lie could brine liimselr to show, to his "once familiar friend." How subtly treacherous lie had been, that Charley—as he had affectionately called him. During those lonely nights in their hut. when they were shepherd ing vast flocks in the plains or on the low hills, he had told Charley his life, from A to Z; and recently he had made him the confidante of his love for Netta, and of bis resolve to once more try his luck at the diggings, for her sake. He recalled Charley's farewell. He, Jim, was seated on his faithful Jenny, his blankets and miner's wardrobe packed "fore and aft" his saddle. After affectionate farewells to old Nathan and Netta, he had started 011 his long ride to Mount Merry diggings, walking the impatient Jenny at first, so as...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Great Montamor Case. CHAPTER I. In the Australian Bush. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

The Great Montamor , Base. I By ALICE M. DIEHL, j Authoress of "The Knave of Hearts,'' i CJ1APTKR I. Ill the Australian Bush. Jim Gilbert foil <1 thrill of anxiety, of anticipation, as he walked his heated mare slowly among the clunks of gum tiees, and, emerging into a .brief patch of waste land, halted to gaze at the plain sloping away below. There, beyond the eucalyptus wood, lay the farmhouse containing his be loved Netta, the only child of Nathan Grey, owner of the big sheep run, where he and his friend, Onirics Daunce, had cast in their lot as co squatters a year before, when tired of their last sheep-farming venture to gether. He was a comely, broad, fair Juiglishman, paler and somewhat less burly after a recent fall while working i.i the Mount Berry diggings—a fali which had rendered him unconscious for some weeks, and which now sent him back to the farm to recruit. He I is still dazed and weal:, and his thoughts seemed to travel round and round a subject rather th...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RALPH WALDO TRINE [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

RALPH WALDO TRINE I Some interesting particulars of the career of Mr Ralph Waldo Trine, whose books are well known in this country, are supplied by the "Chris tian Commonwealth." I Born at Mount Morris, in Illinois, in ' 1SGC, the author of the "Life Books" had to face a great many hardships In early life. Before he could begin the course of study at Carthage College, on which.lie had set his heart, Mi Trine had to earn sufficient money in his native village by chopping wood and doing similar work. While at college Mr Trine supported himself by private tutorial work, and after leaving found various employ ments both industrial and intellectual; teaching, lecturing, and newspaper work has been varied by manual labor and even some spells of unemployment. Mr Trine does most of his writing out of doors, and loves to work in the fields. Ho lives on a farm of some six ty acres in extent up among the "Win chester hills, an hour's ride north of New York City, with a fine view for twenty-fiv...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MAKING SOLDIERS [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

MAKING SOLDIERS Speaking at a dinner given in his honor by the Society of Authors in London on November 27, Field-Mar shal Lord Roberts touched upon the necessity for having men trained for the field. They could not bo trusted, he said, no matter what their courage might be, to fight an enemy unless they were trained. He could give them many instances of what could be done by a very few trained soldiers, men who believed in their own skill with their arms and who trusted their comrades ! alongside them or even at great dis . tances apart. ; | Fighting nowadays was a different thing from what it was even in the days of the Crimean War, the Indian | Mutiny, or the Peninsular War. The i ! first battle he was at was at Delhi. , At'that time they were in close order, | ; touching each other in fact. The non commissioned officers and men were shoulder to shoulder, and the firing commenced, as at Waterloo, at -10 or 50 yards distance. I On the Heights of Abraham, Wolfe ' did not give the w...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOX-HUNTING PARSON YORKSHIREMAN APPRECIATES. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

FOXHUNTING PARSON YORKSHIRE-MAN APPRECIATES. As a Ycirkshiroman, as a £ox-hunter, and as one who is happy in the pos session of many friends amongst the Anglican clergy who hunt, I am most anxious to raise a protest against the remarks of Sir Philip Burne-Jones (writes Mr J. Fairfox Blakcborougli, in the "Westminster Gazette"). On his own ipse dixit he practically excommunicates from the pale of Chris tianity all fox-hunters—especially hunt ing parsons—and at the same timo gives pontifical censure to the Arch bishop of. York for having lent hi J presence to the dedication of a stained glass window to the memory of a much-beloved and much-respecte 1 Yorkshire cleric who met his death on the hunting field. Sir Philip Burne Jones cannot understand those in or ders riding to hounds, or those profess ing Christianity enjoying venery. He argues, however, from the hack neyed premises — born of ignorance— that the great joy of the chase, if not the bo all and end all of it, is centred in th...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MEMBERS OF DIAMOND CLUB EVIDENCE IN PEARL CASE [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

MEMBERS OF DIAMOND CLUB EVIDENCE IN PEARL CASE Evidence was given at the uiu Bailey yesterday by a postman named Neville, who delivered the registered package which should have contained the £135,000 pearl necklace, concern ing the theft of which James Lockett, Joseph Grizzard, Simon Silverman, and Leisir Gutwirth are on their trial (reports the "Dally Express" of No vember 22). Neville was called by Mr. Valetta. who.appeared for Silverman. "I delivered the parcel intact," he said. "I would not swear it was the one, but it was very similar to it. I have delivered many parcels of that description." Mr. Valetta: Were you alone on that occasion?—No; I had a bag car rier. Do you know any of these men? —I know Gutwirth and Silverman. Did you have anything to say to these two men when yoir were on ! your round?—Ho, sir. LETTER IN HIS BOX Do you remember if you deliverer1 any parcel to Silverman's office?—I put a letter in his box. You did not see him or hand him personally anything that m...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COTTON GROWING COLORED LABOR QUESTION. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

COTTON GROWING colored labor question. One of the most advanced and in spiring ideas in constructive Imperial featesmanship is the scheme of the Do minions Royal Commission for develop ing Australia as a cotton-producing country (says the "Standard" of No vember 23). The natural advantages of the nor thern part of the Commonwealth for this purpose impressed the members of tlie commission in their tour, and the members have fortunately not returned merely with hopeful and optimistic im pressions, but have gone a considerable distance along the road which turns Ideas into sensible, practical, and work able plans. It is, of course, not to be expected that Queensland and the Northern Ter ritory will immediately be turned into vast cotton fields as fertile as those which line the banks of the Mississippi, but the road to-.vards that goal has been partially cleared, every possible and probable obstacle has been considered, and the future is bright. The commission discussed the sub ject wi...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TEACHING FOLK SONGS [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 30 January 1914

TEACHING FOLK SOXGS Dr. David .• Rces, addressing the Newtown Welsh Literary Society on Welsh Folk Songs, said educational authorities should use these beautiful melodies instead of the common hum drum tilings they did use. If they did that, instead of hearing' snatches of the latest music hall dlties hummed by their youth of town and cpuntry, they would hear the schoolboy, the old and the young, and the man at his bonch, warbling his nation's song as did their forefathers.

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
METHOD. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

METHOD. Not long ago at a meeting the Welsh farmer was being generally reproved for his cxtravagauce. The lecture seomi to have been taken to heart. That is the conviction, at any rate, of a gontloman who was motoring in South Wales the other day (says the "West ern Mail"). While he was waiting in a villago a farmer drove up, hitched his horso to a post, and carefully muzzled the animal with a feeding-bag, The farmer then went round to the back jf his cart and took out of it a chicken with a piece of string tied to one leg. With the string he fastened the chicken to the hitching-post, so that it could pick up the oats dropped from the hone's nose-bag. More than half the pooplc who all through life suffer from tho delusion that they are too clever by half had bettor settle down to some good hura }rum work, and tho earlier in life thoy learn this lesson the hotter.—Arthur Pendcnyi. The resoiling of areas of land by dredges has been a complete failure. A syndicate ia obtaining options ...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Potato Growing. PREVENTION OF POTATO DISEASE [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

Potato Growing. PREVENTION OF POTATO DISEASE Wei ard Indebted to Professor 'Winter of the University College, N. Wales, lor bis report on the prevention ol potatoe disease, which we have taken trom an English .Exchange. From this we learn that, as the result ol sxperimente, in the majority of cases the operation has been attended with luccess. In addition to checking the disease, spraying; in a great many coses increases the crop. Experience has shown that in order to secure the best resulta .the potatoes should be sprayed before the diseaso appears, and in some cases they are sprayed again in about three weeks. The prepa ration most frequently used is known as the Bordeaux mixture, and con lists of— * 201bs. of sulphate of copper. lOlbs. of lime. ^ 100 gallons of water. The mixture is applied at the rate of 100 to 150 gallons per acre. There are several preparations similar ■ in their main features to the Bordeaux mixture, .which can be obtained ready for use. One of these, named "...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHO IS SUPERFLUOUS? [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

"WHO IS SUPERFLUOUS? The baker, bootmaker, ploughman, fisherman, and miner obvious)/ add to tho assets of a country. . Obviously tlio parson, the stockbroker, the actor, do not. Yet all are workers. Hence it is quite clear that employment is no criterion of prosperity. Nor have we any system of disvovcring what we are losing by allowing unproductive labor to withdraw workers from productive labor. Every farmer's sou who be comes a clerk is a national loss. Every mill-hand who becomes a domestic ser vant is a loss (except when the labor market is overcrowded). Every acre of land untilled or untimbered is a na tional loss. And in competition with the foreigner productivity counts foi all, and employment for nothing at all. Collecting postage stamps, or acting at a footman, is employment. J5nt 'c is unproductive. Then to the superllu ous wo must add— Those who live on dividend without voluntary productive labor. Those who supply entertainment that does not provide men and women with vi...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHARACTER-GROWTH AND FICTION. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

OHARACTEE-GROWTH AND FICTION. Through its inability to portray moral development on the large scale, modern fiction remains out of touch with the requirements of the best ami most serious readers. For, amid all the speculative eagerness and unrest of the age, tho interest of the most serious men and womon among us is profoundly moral; it is for learning the secret of true character-growth that they su premely care, holding all other interests vital only as they can be made to min ister to, or are in some way connect ed with, this highest one; and the nov elists who will set themselves to re cover tho lost art which made the mas ters groat, will both make lictiou great again and find their way to the appro bation of those whose favorable ver diet is most to be desired. -Henry W. Clark, in the "Book Monthly."

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GERMANY AND BRITAIN PRINCE BULOW'S BOOK. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

GERMANY AND BRITAIN PRINCE BULOW3 BOOK. The most interesting part of Prince Bulow's book on foreign policy deals with the present difference between the French and the British attitude to Ger many (savs the Berlin correspondent of "The Daily News"). "It is true." the Prince says, "that England is seriously concerned by our growing naval power and by our competition, which incon venienccs her at many points. It Is true also that there are still English men who believe that England could only profit by the disappearance of the obnoxious German rival. But there is a distinct difference between ^ such English sentiments and the basic sen timent of France. "France would attack us if and when she thought she was in a position of sufficient power, while England would only attack us if she came to the con clusion that she could only carry through her vital economic and politi cal interests against Germany by force. The mainspring of England's political attitude to us is national egotism, th...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY MILK TESTS VARY. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

WHY MILK TESTS VABY. Professor J. A. Conover, of tho Kan sas Experiment Station, writes of milk tests as follows:—At nearly every institute' Attended by I'rofessor Cot trel and myself, the question was ask ed: "What is tho reason of our milk tests being 2.6 per cent, one month, and next, under exactly the same con ditions, it tests 1 per cent, or more/" There are a great many things that affoct the test, so that we cannot point to any one thing as doing it. In the first place, the conditions aro never "exactly" the same; the pasture may 1 be better ono month than another, the weather may be cooler or warmer, per haps you encourage the cow less with the milk stool, or perhaps the boy who brings them in does not get them so much excited. All these things and many more influence the per cent, of butter-fat. Kindness is sure to be re warded by an increase in both the p v: cent, of butter-fat and also in the milk yield; whenever you abuse tho cow, either by a sharp word, the miik stool, ...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GIRL DRUGGED [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

GIRL DRUGGED A new method practised by white slavers to secure victims is believed to have been discovered by the police of Newark, New Jersey (says the New York correspondent of "The Dally Ex press" of December G). It is alleged that they inject opiates into attractive girls during the darkness in movingr picture theatres, and then pose as rela tives and carry them off. ^his system has been brought to light by the arrest last night, at a cinema palace at Newark, of Armand Megaro, a South American employed as a chemist's assistant. Megaro was committed for trial to-day, £4000 bail being required, after Mrs. Marjorie Graff, the bride of two weeks of a Newark civil engineer, had told her story in court. Mrs. Graff said that she occupied a seat in a box, and that Megaro entered her box from another, and took a seat beside her. Suddenly she experi enced a pricking .sensation in her wrist, and in a few moments she felt ill and faint, and w:-nt to the ladies' parlor, where an attendant re...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MALICIOUS JOY. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

MALICIOUS JOY. The "Boston Transcript" tells the following:— Old Peterby is ricli and stingy. In the event of his death his nephew will inherit his property. A friend of the family said to the old gentleman: "I hepr your nephew is going to marry. On that occasion you ought to do something to make him happy." "I will" said Peterbv; "I'll pre tond that t am dangerously ill." Most people are lonely because they hlrro never dared to live. Thev U3U ally -wake up ten years too late. -Rich-' trd King.

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CONVICT SNOBS [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 6 February 1914

CONVICT SNOBS There has been a movement for separate tables at moals among the convicts at the prison "hotel" at Camp Hill, Isle ot Wight, where an attempt is made to reform convicts by special privileges (says the "Daily Mail"). Meal times at Camp Kill are social functions which the warders are not permitted to disturb. These old, habitual criminals, who have been granted many comforts by the autho rities, have after-dinner chats which are often o£ a strictly confidential nature. Lately a distinct "caste" feeling lias sprung up. The more notorious men have formed a clique. They decline to discuss subjects with men of less repute. Apart from this purely pro fessional jealousy, there are sharp cleavages of opinion, religious, moral, and political, which have been so marked that further controversy on gentlemanly lines is cut of the ques tion. The result is that things have not been so happy as formerly at the long tables in the diningroom. Several men have the habit of leaning across...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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