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Title: Seymour Express And Goulburn Valle... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,508 items from Seymour Express And Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook And Yea Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LADY AND CHOIR BOY. WIFE'S INFATUATION. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

LADY AND CHOIR BOY. WIFE'S INFATUATION There was no defence in the ease io cently heard before Sir Samuel Evans in which Mr Cuthbert George Dent pe tioned for a divorce from his wife, Kate Louisa Dent, alleging her mis conduct slith William Collett, who was cited as co-respondent. AMr Watts, representing the petition er, said he was married in.1897 . At the end of 1910, his wife made the ac quaintance of co-respondent, a youth ,of nineteen. One day, upon return ing home .he found this young mall cutting the lawn grass. Mrs Dent said he was one of the church choris ters. On a subsequent date Mrs Dent said 'Collett would take her to the picture palace. The petitioner. pro tested, and she agreed not to see Col lett.again. One night, however, when the petitioner arrived home earlier than he was expected he saw Collett leaving by -the. back door. Subse quentlv lie received from Collett's land lady two letters which Mrs Deit had written to him, and on July 4, the following letter came -to...

POTTING BUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

POTTING BUTTER. Potting butter is quite a simple mat ter. For home use, your best plan is to use small jars if possible, holding what you can make at one time. This, however, is not essential. For pot ting it, you will require to use a little more salt than is usual, say, alb for every 121b of butter, also use about half an ounce of-121 lb of butter. Do not use more than this. As soon as the butter is made, scald your jars or tins thoroughly, using a little com mon washing soda in the boiling water Drain the jar. and then pack the but ter tightly, after which, sprinkle a thin .layer of salt on "0p. Melt a little butter and pour it on top of the salt; and aS soon as this is cool, tie down the jar with parchment paper, or common paper and white of egg. If 'ou have not enough. butter to fill a jar at once, follow the same instruc tions with regard to salting and pre servatives. Pat the butter very lightly with a level surface and pour on top of about an inch of strong brine, madd by di...

A WONDERFUL OAT. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

A WONDERFUL OAT. There is growing in Lancashire on Garton's Seed grounds at Warrington a single oat plant which surpasses by several hundred points any cereal ev er ploduced in the world. The single head contains a few short of 1000 -rains, ten times as many as you will find in the best crops. The plant "s a more or less accidental result of the original system of what may be ter med accelerated evolution, which has been practised on these grounds for the .last 27 years. This particular prodigy has been obtained by orossiug highly developed oats. with the wild oat, which has an- incalculable capacity for bearing seed. These are small and useless, but--the strange fact has been discovered that the wi!d oat may. in orossing, even enlarge the grain of. the cross, as well as increase its number. This particular oat is but an extresne instance of the new pro ductions In cereals of all sorts. It is an indisputable fact that, though practical farmers will have difficulty in believing it, t...

COLLISION IN FOG. STEAMER SUNK IN NORTH SEA. ONLY FOUR OF CREW SURVIVE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

COLLISION IN FOG. STEAMER SUNK IN NORTH SEA. ONLY FOUR OF CREW SURVIVE. Eighteen lives have been lost as the result of a recent collision during a dense fog in the North Sea, in which a British vessel, the North Shields steamer Gardenia, was sunk. The 'colliding steamer was the london ves sel Cornwood. There were only four survivors 'of the disaster. They were pioked up and landed at Yarmouth. Tho-Gardenia was bound from Africa to Middlesborough with a cargo of iron ore. At six o'clock in the morn ing a fog came on, and four hours later the steamer was stopped off Middlecross Sands. In an interview, the captain who was resoued, stated that lie heard a stenmer approaching. He kept his whistle blowing, but before anything culd be done the Cornwood struck his vessel in No. 4 hold. The steamer at once began to fill with.water, and in four minutes went down. The captain had ordered every man to put on a life-belt, and also ordered the life-boats to he lowered, but- before' the life boats...

TREATMENT FOR BOTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

TREATMENT FOR BOTS. The following treatment has been. tested on a large number of animals and proved sucoessful by the United States Department of Agriculture. It is said that it will remove beots to within twenty-four to forty-eight hours. The day preceding the treat menta small amount of hay and a moderato amount of oats are given in the morning, m the evening food is withheld ,and a -purgative given: Barbadoes aloes, 1 oz. of raw linseed oil, 1 pint. The day of the treat ment, at six o'olock in the morning, give three drams of carbon bisulphide, in a gelatine' capsule; at seven o'clock, repeat the dose in the same manner. and at eight o'clock, give the third and last dose, making in all nine drams of carbon sulphide in three gel atine capsiules. The above treatment is for the adult horse. For a yearling colt half the treatment of carbon bisulpyide -sd for a mature horse will give the desire ed results. If properly administered, the gelatine capsule reaohes the, sto mach intact, b...

HOSPITAL NURSE'S ROMANCE [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

HOSPITAL NURSE'S ROMANCE. A pretty Irishl nurse, Miss Ethel Bur rows, Jeft Belfast recently bound for Durban, where, on her arrival, she is to be married to Mr Herbert Walton, a wealthy landowner at Ladysmith. The meeting of Miss Burrows and her fiance was of a romantic charaoter. A few years ago, she was employed as factory lass in a Belfast linen firm, but having shown a taste for nursing and ambulance work, Dr William M'Ken zie of Belfast took an interest in her. and she became a probationer in a nurs ing home. . During the last 12th of July celebra tions, Mr Walton, who was on a visit to Ireland, watohed from the open first floor window of the Grand Central Ho tel, Belfast, an Orangeman's proces sion.- He was particularly interested in a banner which bore a portrait of the late field marshall Sir George, White. As a man carried the fag past the hotel Mr Walton turned to a friend and remarked: "That is the. man who saved my country for Eng land."' Next moment he stumbled and fell...

POET AS STOWAWAY. WANTED TO GET TO LONDON. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

POET AS STOWAWAY. WANTED TO GET TO LONDON. An-American poet,-Harry Kemp, was charged at Southampton recently with having been a stowaway on board the Oceanic. Mr C. F. Hisoock, proseoiuting on behalf of the White Star Line, said the facts were perfectly clear. Prisoner wilfully came on board with the object of getting out of his own country and coming to England. The Oceania left New York on Saturday, September 27, .at noon, ,and at half past five-on the same day, Kemp presented himself at the pur ser's office, and handed in the following letter:-- - "I am Harry Kemp, a very well known poet, whose verse appears quite often in magazines, and I have also a book published; yet, despite all this, I found myself penniless in New York, and I wanted to get to England, where I could procure a London pilblisher. 1 walked on board your vessel, hoping that I might work my way." When discovered, it seemed perfectly dear, continued Mr Hiscock, that Kemp made known his intention in New York of co...

THE FEEBLE-MINDED AS WORKERS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

THI FEEBLE-MINDED AS WORKERS. "It should be understood clearly, writes a woman doctor, that the feeble in mind, no matter how carefully they are trained, will never be able to sup port themselves. The-oost of the careful supervision which is always necessary makes it impossible that any colony should be run solely on the proceeds of the work done by the col onists. What can be done is, by careful adjustment of -administration and by wise apportionment of work, ac cording to the powers and wishes of thd boys and girls cared for, to greatly reduce thle sum which must be found either from the rates or from private plulanthropy. The farm colony is pro bably much the best form of perman ent care for the feeble-minded, both necessarily mean the establishing of a protected trade, in competition with outside labour, and because of the great variety of work which is provided by the cultivation of land. ' *Other trades should be run in connection with . the farming and gardening, so that by d...

FACTS ABOUT THE SILO. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

FACTS ABOUT THE SILO. Twenty years' experience in the use, of the silo has brought about some facts about which one and all are ag reed: 1.-That .a large amount of health ful cattle food can-be preserved in the silo in better condition, with less ex pense of labor and land, than by any other method known.. 2; That silage.comes nearer being a perfect substitute for the sueculent food of the pasture than any other food that can be had in the winter. , 8. Thirty pounds a day is enough silage for an average sized Jersey cow. Larger cattle will eat more. 4. A cubio foot of silage from the middle of a medium sized silo will av erage about 451b weight. 5. For. 182 days, or half a year, an average Jersey cow will require about six tons of silage, allowing for unavoid able waste. 6. The circular silo, made of good hardwood staves, is cheapest and best. 7. Fifteen feet is a good diameter, and 20 feet a good depth. Snuoh a silo will hold about 200 tons of silage, cut into half iich lengths. 8....

MAN OF THE FORESTS. ARTIST WHO LIVED IN WOODS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

MAN OF THE FORESTS. ARTIST WHO LIVED IN WOODS. together. When the sugar is dissolved, Looking like a primitive skin-olad cave man, Mr Joseph Knowles a Boston artist, has emerged from the forests of Maine, after a two months' fight for existence in the woods. Mr Knowles left the woods near Me gantic, on the Canadian Pacific Rail road. He was clhid in skins of black bear and deer, and was carrying a pack on his back, containing materials for making a fire and tools which he had tashioned to aid him in living a prim itive life. Thus has ended Mr Knowles test of hardihood and endurance to conquer a hostile environment. On August 4, the artist plunged into tho forests near the Spencer Lakes, Maine, and then had no clothes, no weapons, no implements of any kind, and no food. He promised to comne out of the woods on October 4, fully clad, in good health and physical con dition. He has kept his promise in every detail. The artist left his do main near Spencer Lake, struck out across untrack...

TOWN-PLANNING FOR LIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

STOWN-PLANING FOR LIGHT. Far-reaching reform in town-plan ning as a primary factor in the battle against tuberculosis was demanded by the architect,,Augustin Rey, in an, ad dress made before the French Society of Civil Engineers. According to M. Rey, cities of the future must be so constructed that the direction of all the streets shall correspond to the sun's daily course in the heavens, in order that the infabitants-may receive the maximum of light, which is the greatest microbe-killer in existence. The task of architects,-he says, will be to plan towns in such a way that every nook and corner shall receive its share of the sun's rays for the greatest possible number of hours daily. On this account he insists that the present system of small, apartments will have to go, and their places be taken by smaller and inore airyT dwellings. He concludes by saying that the present nickname of Paris, "The City, of Light," should be that of all towns which care for the, health of their'in-' ...

COWBOY IN ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

COWBOY IN ENGLAND. A young fellow "Tacoma Kid,"' p peared in court recently in pioturesque cowboy attire, having been summoned for interfering with the comfort of pas sengers on the London Brighton, and South Coast Railway. lie was fur ther summoned for carrying a loaded revolver, contrary to the by-laws of the company. James Hill, a telephone engineer said on'September 6, he was travelling from the Crystal Palace Low Level station to Forest Hill by the 10.35 train. He was accompanied by his wife and. two children. Just before the train star ted, the defendant came to the door of the compartment, with a revolver in his: hand and remarked,- .'Who says there ain't no room in here?" lie sat down between two ladies, and after the train started, proceeded to extract a cartridge from the revolver. He plac ed this on a coa,, but after. a while he replaced the cartridge. The train had only gone a short distance, when the defendant got up, and remarking "I should like to give the old palace ...

MELBOURNE LETTER [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

MELBOURNE LETTER (Prom-our Special Correspond?ent.) A section of the metropolitan press has taken upon itself to point out the faults and" failings of the police force. The much-enduring constable is accused of all sorts of delinquencies -chief among them being, apparently, a lack of the Chesterfieldian manner in moving on the garrulous folk that block the sidewalks in the principal thoroughiares and the sensitive young things who make "under the clocks" their place of ass.iglation-or perhaps we had better call it their rendezvous. The "cop" is perhaps' no better than he should be-especially the younger biigade of hu--but- that is probably more the fault of the system thian anything else. This most important branch of the public service should be the mnost attractive, but it is not. 'The -pay, compared with, the ruling rates of remune;'ation nowadays, is paltry, and the work is onerous and often dangerous. Instead of decrying the police, and thus encouraging the. un desirable elemen...

EXIT WAR. F. RAYS AS POLICE OF PEACE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

EXIT WAR: F. RAYS AS POLICE OF PEACE War has beei sentenced to death (writes H. Malone In the Syaney "Sun"). It has been ordred to be taleen irom the place where it now Is, to the place whence it came, and thence to the place of exccuion, to be hanged by the neck until it be dead. 'Ann may the Lbid have mercy on its soul. And the wonder of it is that the sentence has been passed, not by a Napoleonic superhuman,- who fougut his way througu bayonets to the bench, leaving the world a shambles in the cause of peaoe; not by zealots preaching a brotherly love to a world that was lacking not in affection, but in common-sense; not .by calm puibos ophers endeavoring to make their log io heard by millions who would have none of logio;' but by a little bald slluaded man in a laboratory-a man who looked with contempt on the Great Leader, and with indifference on the preacher, who respected the logic of the philosopher only in so far as it applied to the,exsperiments of his own laboratory. Had h...

CURIOUS CHARGE DISMISSED. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

CURIOUS CHARGE DISMISSED. A man named Paul Robert Rosinski was charged with having stolen a large quantity of .watohes, valued at £1645, the property of Israel Herman. Mr De Fries, who conducted the pro secution, said Mr Hermain was a manu facturer's agent. During the last three months the aoused, with whom he was acquainted, shared his offioe. On theo evening of September 30, Mr Hermha left ih his office some watches to the value of £1600 odd. On ar riving next morning he found on his table a scrap of paper, containing the following in defendant's handwriting: "Where are my opals? You will hear from my sollicitor to-morrow. I don't want to do this cheating business."' Deteotive Inspector Collison gave evi dence as to the arrest of defendant. Rosinski denied that he took the watch es with intent to steal, but said his mo tive was to bring the matter znto court. He made certain allegations against Mr Herman's mode of carrying on business, and said that some opals defendant had asked ...

AGRICULTURAL CONTESTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

AGRICULTURAL CONTESTS. Educational contests in Agriculture and Home Economics is the title of a bulletin issued by the office of Experi ment Stations, U.S.A. Department of Agriculture. G. I. Christie, Sup erintendent of Agricultural" Extension of Indiaha, is the author. The bul letin gives methods of organisations and rules governing such contests. The author statesi-"The contest de mands the actual doing of things, and thereby, interests many in its individual importance. It is well for the youth to hear or to read of thingsbefore be ing done by someone else. From this: they may gain much of interest and value. However, when one performs a task for himself, putting into it his best thought and effort, the results are bound to be of the greatest value in the knowledge and the personal sat isfaction gained in the lasting respect for labor reqeurcd. Contests do much to broaden the knowledge and view point of contestants. The boy who takes part in a corn contest is devel oping a nucleu...

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. An easy way to open oysters is to place them on a hot stove for a fel seconds, when the oysters will open, and you are able to get your knife in without the slightest trouble. When bottling liquids of any descrip tion boil the corks to soften them, and while hot press them into the bottles; when cold the bottles will' be found to be quite tightly sealed. Always fillet your filh and truss your fowls at home, or you lose the trim mings and giblets, which are so useful in stock-making. Never thicken gravy while it is boil ing. Draw the pan oontaining the gravy away from the fire, and mux the thickening in slowly, stirring it till all lumps have disappeared. 'Stir while all boils up, and cook a few moments, and it ms ready to serve. Wooden spoons and chopping boards should be well scrubbed with bath-brick or sand in preference to soap. This treatment whitens the wood and makes it smooth. If the wood has been stained with grease, it should be wash ed in soda water before...

WORLD'S LONGEST BRIDGE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

WORLD'S LONGEST BRIDGE. It seems probable that next year a comniencement will be made with the uonstruction of the railway bridge be tween Rugen and the mainland which will be longest in the Wiorld, exceeding even that over the .Hohangho, with its 3580 -yards. The cost of this great engineering work'is not expcctcd to amount to more tlhan £1,000,000, or less than a third of that of the Forth Bridge. When the- bridge, which, it is said, is to include a track foi pedestrians, though none for road traffic. -is completed, it will suibstan tially shorten the journeys between Berlin and Hamburg on the one hand •and Stockholm and Christiania on the other. The Union Bank of Australia Limittd has declared a dividend at the rate of 10 per cent. per annum for the half year ended August 31, "~13, and a be nus of 2 per cent. for the half-year, together equivalent to 14 per cent. per lliunm. "no sum of £18,000 is rp propriated to meet the interest on inttalments - on the new shares, and, after ca...

QUARREL COST A LIFE. OWNERSHIP OF PAIR OF PLIERS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

QUARREL COST A LIFE. OWNERSHIP OF PAIR OF PLIERS. Over a- pair of pliers a quarrel took plate, which resulted on the allegal murder of Charles Johnson, a dock !a borer. The man was found bleedi:g from a terrible gash in' the throat in London, and he expired shortly after staggering to a surgery. Sub sequently, John Griffa, or Griffiths, a dart-board maker, surrendered to ,he police, and was charged with murder. Events 'that led up to the tragedy were described at the inquest by Charles Henry Hart, an able-seaman.. Witness said he was in the kitchen when Griffin eame in, and walking rp to Johnson said "Where's my pair of pliers?" Johnson replied "I dent know where the pliers are." Then John son and Griffin went - out together wrangling. Witness heard Johnson say, "They're not worth threepence," and Griffin replied, "I don't care whe ther they're worth a quid, I want them." About four or five minutes afterwards he saw them standing co gether, still wrangling, in St Annea street, near ...

NEWS SUMMARY. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 16 January 1914

..NEWS SUMMARY. A shopkeeper at Croydon (England), has been fined £30, with the alternative of imprisonment for three months, for having sold margarine as butter. He had been fiined on several previous o0 casions. Another shopkeeper .was fined for a similar offence. Mr. M. P. Cordia, assistant man ager of the Royal Dutch Packet Com pany at Sydney, was a passenger by the s.s. Houtmau, which arrived from Java. He said that trade between Java and Australia was increasing. The Australian trade was booming, espooi ally in Singapore and the Malay States. 'T'he inquiry regarding the deaths of the miners John Kirby and Thomas J. Reid, who were killed in the Tasmania mine on January 2, has been conclud ed. The jury returned a verdict that the.umen had met their deaths through a fall of rock, and that no blame was attachable to any person. The W.A. gold yield for December was 112,120 oz., of the value of £476,255. In November the yield was 117,912 oz., and in December, 1912, it was 115,937 oz...

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