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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

FREE BATH TOWELS SAVE ALL YOUR     PEARL SOAP WRAPPERS     Only 10 PEARL WRAPPERS   (LARGE) for a splendid quality   FREE TOWEL     You have until 31st OCTOBER, 1933         to save Pearl Soap wrappers for these         wonderful towels—it doesn't take long           to save up 10 wrappers, and all the           time you have the benefit of using a   soap that really does lessen         your work.       Collect only 10 large or 25 small Pearl Soap   wrappers ; cut off the inside bottom panels bearing the " Pure Food Act " Guarantee (as ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
STILL NO PLACE like HOME The SIMPLE CREED of LADY GAME [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

STILL NO PLACE like HOME The SIMPLE CREED of LADY GAME Never in the history of England has there been a time when the personality of her Queen was of such supreme importance to the women of the nation as it is to-day. Never in the history of New South Wales has the per- sonality of the Governor's wife mattered so much to the women of this State as it does at the present time. THE hour, it is said, brings forth the man. Equally true is it that the hour brings forth the woman. Queen Mary, in Eng- land, and Lady Game, in this State, are shining examples of this happy truth. Times of stress, stripping away the camouflage, reveal the charac- ter beneath. In England they have   revealed Queen Mary carrying on   the highest traditions of woman-   hood, setting an example which has   been an inspiration to millions. For all her Queenliness, she is essen- tially a home-lover, getting her own personal joys from the strength of the ties which...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
HOUSEWIVES WATCH THESE PRICES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

HOUSEWIVES— WATCH THESE PRICES Dairy Farm Produce: Butter, 1/2 to 1/6 lb. ; bacon, 1/3 to 1/6 lb.; eggs, 1/- to 1/8 dozen; cheese, 9d to 1/2 lb.     Fruits: Apples. 6d to 1/- a dozen; pears, 6d to 1/- dozen; oranges, 6d to 2/- dozen; lemons, 6d to 9d dozen; bananas, 9d to 2/- dozen.   Vegetables: Beans and peas, 4d to *d lb.;   potatoes, 13lbs. for 1/; swedes, 1d lb.; onions   1d lb.; cauliflower, 4d to 1/3 each; cabbages 4d to 1/- each; celery, 1d stick; tomatoes, 4d to 6d lb.       Meat: Lamb, hinds 1/- to 2/- ea, shoulders 7½d to 10d each, legs 1/- to 1/6 each, fores   9d to 1/- each; steak, rib 3d to 4d lb., blade 3d to 4d lb., chuck 4d to 5d lb.; breasts 1d to 2d lb.; sausages, beef 6d to 7d lb., pork 3d to   5d lb.; chops, 4d to 6d lb.; sausage meat 2½d to 4d lb.; tripe, 4½d lb.; rabbits, 4½d to 6d   each; force meat, 4d to 6d lb.     F...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
SO THEY SAY! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

LET us take Lord Dawson of Penn's famous saying, "Choice—not chance," in the production of children as our watchword to usher in a happier era when women shall be free from the slavery of enforced maternity.— Dr. Kate Ardill Brice, at the Feminists' Conference. CLINICS in Victoria deal with what we call the problem child—the child with problems such as truancy, thiev- ing, stealing, lying, and other forms of delinquency. All abnormalities of children and youths can be traced to mental conflict in adolescence, due to the child's nature or its environment.— Dr. R. S. Ellery, psychiatrist. THE Government should purchase each year the best picture or the best piece of statuary. The judging could be carried out by an independent commit- tee, and the purchases could be dis-   tributed among the various towns.—Mrs. E. M. Irvine, at the 23rd exhibition of the Society of Women Painters. CHEERINESS is a thing to be more profoundly grateful for than all the genius ever inspired or...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Like Cinderella you would forget the time, if you wore this, one of the- smartest of the new evening shoes. Front and heels are of dull blue satin. The top which is of crinkly crepe of the same shade, is crystal studded. Note the cut out leaf and ribbon effect that adorn the side.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Our PIANO....Prodigy Truth About Philip Hargrave [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Our PIANO   . . . . .Prodigy Truth About Philip Hargrave Specially written for The Australian Women's Weekly The musical excitement of the year threatens to be the discovery of Australia's latest infant   prodigy, Philip Hargrave. His tour has been a veritable triumph, and women have been to the forefront in ac- claiming him at every con- cert, showing that sentiment is not unmixed with the matter of artistic ap- preciation. What is the calm truth about the boy's ability, away   from the hys- teria of a packed concert- hall and cheer- ing crowds? UNDOUBTEDLY he is exception- ally gifted, and is far beyond the average ability of even a clever child of his years. He combines a musi- cianship with his technical gifts, and is strangely mature. He does Bach extra- ordinarily well. So far so good. On the other side of the ledger we must put the fact that he does not yet play, in this writer's opinion, as well as a few senior students   a...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
DOUBLE USE FOR VEGETABLE GARDEN [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

DOUBLE USE FOR VEGETABLE GARDEN There are two ways of regarding the kitchen or vegetable garden. One is to exclude rigorously every- thing of a floral nature, the other is to intermingle flowers with the vegetables. The latter idea may sound incon- gruous, but it can be done so judi- ciously that the result is quite har- monious. In the smaller city dwel- lings, where gar- dening space is at a premium, this scheme has its ad- vantages. In some gardens the part reserved for kitchen use is completely isolated from the flower gar- den, whereas there are other gardens in which the two seem to meet, without any distinct division, and both may be well in view from the house. Yet, even if the kitchen garden is quite apart from the house, flowers may be cultivated for cutting. It is a sen- sible plan to grow special flowers en- tirely for this purpose, where one can deplete them of bloom without con- sidering that the garden will look bare.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

GUILTY! Does 1933 find you just where you were in 1932 ? If so, your Conscience must find you Guilty of Wasting Spare Time, and sentence you to an hour of I.C.S. study each night. Tum that loose- into MONEY, acquit you when end hour, between six and seven, and your CONSCIENCE will in 1934. you look back on 1933. I.C.S. Students gel the big jobs—and keep them! International Correspondence Schools (Australasia) Ltd. 140 ELIZABETH STREET, SYDNEY Sirs,—Please send me a free prospectus showing how I can succeed in the occupation I have marked. Accountant (InstEx) Aeroplane Engin'r, Com. Illustrator, Aeroplane Rigger, Fashion Drawing, Aero. Designing, Cari'tures & C'toons, Motor Engineer, Poster Drawing, Diesel Engineer.   Journalism, Motor Mech. Exam. Short Story Writing, Electrical Engineer Show Card Writer, Elec. Mech. Exam. Salesman (any branch) El. Wiremen's Ex., Advert'r (any branch) Radio Engineering. Business M'gement, Radio Exam., General Bookkeeper, Radio (T...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
MOTOR CHAT Car Reflects Your Home and Character [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

MOTOR CHAT Car Reflects Your Home and Character The appearance of your car may be taken as an index to your character and home. An untidy, ill-cared-for car is often an indication that the owner or driver has little time in her own life for neatness order appearance and so on. Even if not this, it may tell a story of an abominably lazy husband. But a bright, smiling, well-groomed car, even if it is old, tells a vastly different tale and how much more pleasant. THINK of the uncared-for cars you see on the roads, and the impression their occupants make on you. That radiator with yellow streaks and rain-spots, that dull nickel round the windscreen which only needs a little polish, those scratched mudguards which a touch of black enamel would render respectable, all give a general air of neglect to a car which a few months ago may have been bright and shining. There is a feeling that the owner's house must present the same untidy, uncared-for appear- ance. Cleaning does, of course, take...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
An Editorial JUNE 10, 1933. WE INTRODUCE OURSELVES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

An Editorial JUNE 10, 1933. WE INTRODUCE OURSELVES THE Australian Women's Weekly   is confident that it will   amaze and delight Aus-   tralian women: and the     reason is because it is   making a style, a policy, and an outlook of its own. The one thing we would ask of critical women is this: Read The Aus- tralian Women's Weekly, and com- pare it. Look at its features, and look for its equal. Women want to dress well. They also want to understand the tangled events of the bewildering world around them, especially when women's lives and hopes are affected. They want to be interested, but they also want in- struction. They sometimes want help, and advice, but they must have con- fidence in it. They will be given all these things in The Australian Women's Weekly. The cream of the world's fiction. Everything of importance happening in the world, seen through women's eyes. Brilliant frock and knitting pattern...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
HONORED By THE KING [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

HONORED By THE KING CONGRATULATIONS are hearty and genuine for those Sydney women who have gined recognition through the King's Birthday honors. Goulburn people must be feelling par- ticularly proud that the work of their Miss Phyllis Boissier has been recognised again. When war broke out, Miss Bois- sier, who was matron of the Manly Hos- pital, at once offered her services, and she sailed on the first hospital ship for the Front. Here her good work came under the attention of the authorities, and she received the R.R.C. (Royal Red Cross) from the hands of the King him- self. In 1918, she went back as matron to the Royal Prince Alfred, the hospital in which she had received her training. LADY HARVEY, whose husband, the   Chief Judge in Equity, has just been honored by the King, owns up to being domesticated and a great home lover. But she finds time to work for St. Luke's Hospital, of which board she is a mem- ber, and for the Darling Point-Wool- lahra centre, of which ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Worthwhile Careers The Career of a PRIVATE SECRETARY offers exceptional opportunities for hap- piness and accomplishment to the well- educated, ambitious girl—and it is for- tunate for Business that such girls are turning more and more to Business than ever before. The Metropolitan Girls' Secretarial Institute provides a distinctive and dependable Diploma Course for young women of good education—leading to positions of responsibility—trust—and power. It aims to produce LEADERS. The M.G.S.I. Diploma Course includes Shorthand, Typing, Bookkeeping, Filing, Business Principles and Economics, Sec- retarial Practice, Adding and Calcu- lating Machines, Personal Efficiency, Applied Psychology, Elocution, Deport- ment. Ask for free booklets—"Women, Too, Shall Hold the Heights" and "The Private Secretary." METROPOLITAN GIRLS' SECRETARIAL INSTITUTE. Careers The Career of a Young PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS MAN has unlimited scope for achievement and success in many spheres. Wentworth College Intensi...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
ONE HUSBENT TO ANOTHER— DON'T! L. W. Lower's Advice After Swopping Pants for Petticoats [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

ONE HUSBENT TO ANOTHER— DONT ! L. W. Lower's Advice After Swopping Pants for Petticoats Wep's idea of Mr.   Lower doing the   washing up. By L. W. LOWER, Australia's foremost humorous writer. "IT''S a pity we couldn't change   places for a week; you'd know     what a marvellous, easy life I lead   then," said my wife.   "Right!" I said, tearing off my   trousers. "You wear 'em. Give me that   apron." As I discovered later, it was a silly thing to do, but I was sick of being   master of the house and getting bullied   all over the place and picked on and   blamed for everything. So Chysanthemum went off to work (after I'd got her break- fast). She left the front gate wide open and I had to close it after her — and I started on the housework. Having noticed the messy, un- methodical way women have of going about simple household ta...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
MELBOURNE CALLING.. MELBOURNE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

MELBOURNE CALLING .. MELBOURNE. Dear Jane: We—by the royal plural I mean Mel- bourne—have launched out during the past week or so. "Dizzy" is almost the only word that describes the daily round. To start with: A record was put up by the committee running the dance held on the S.S. Katoomba for the Free Kindergarten Union, in making it a really comfortable affair. Most ship- board dances might as well be held in the temple of the winds, but this time the committee coped with the frolicsome breezes which lurk round piers by using bunting to make a corridor leading from taxi to deck. Most of Melbourne's young people were there, including Hersey and Elaine Brookes and their elder sister, Cynthia, our future Lady Mayoress, all of whom lurked behind corsages of flowers. So was the Lord Mayor, who, with his youthful fiancee, was a guest of honor at a dance given by Sir Frank and Lady Clarke's sons early last week. Later, Theo Shall, who made his bow as actor- manager-producer recently at t...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WHAT IS IT? [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

WHAT IS IT? My first I may in truth declare - Its name and nature both mean air. My second likes to always rove, 'Tis often found beside a stove. My whole in many a crowded street Lies in its bed beneath your feet. Answer: Gas Pipe.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Connie's Letter [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Connie's Letter My Dear Pals, Here we are in our new playground, where we will enjoy all sorts of fun! A wonderful thing about our playground is that everybody can join in the merri- ment-nobody is left out. I want you all to write to me and to feel that this page belongs to you. Join in the Pals' Game, which is to be happy and spread sun- shine. Each week £2 will be given in prizes. If you can sketch, write stories, or poems-send in your efforts and see if you can win any of the prizes which are offered each week. Remember, if your story is the best you will get 10/, if second best 5/. For the best sketch submitted the lucky artist will get 5/, and for the best poem sent in a prize of 10/ is given. Those clever people who can do crossword puzzles are not for- gotten, as each week a prize of 5/ is given for the neatest and correct solu- tion. Take up your pen or pencil this very minute and write to me. I want to hear from you all. Tell me about yourselves and the things you like mos...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Will Pay £100 For Ideas [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Will Pay £100 For Ideas There ¡s £100 waiting to be distributed among readers of The Australian Women's Weekly for clever ideas and suggestions, and the time spent on writing a letter of fifty words may bring a rich prize. THE womenfolk of Australia are in- vited to regard this paper as their own exclusive medium, through which they may express their ideas and thoughts—critical, constructive, humor- ous and otherwise. There is added zest in the fact that a few minutes' thought may bring a reward of anything from 2/6 to £5. The Australian Women's Weekly will distribute £100 in cash among readers contributing the best recipes, jokes, suggestions, paragraphs, and letters of general interest. In times like the present, the oppor- tunity to earn money in this easy man- ner is too good to be missed. On other pages appear details of the features under which the £100 will be distributed. Summarised, however, the money will be paid weekly as follows:— £5 for the best letter telling what you ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WOMEN'S NEWS AS TOLD BY PHOTOS.... [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

WOMEN'S NEWS AS TOLD BY PHOTOS .... BARRACKERS on the banks of the Nepean at the University boat race last Saturday. WHO IS SHE?—The Palais Royal's "Mystery Girl" making her first ap- pearance next Wednesday. MISS ISHBEL MAC- DONALD, daughter of Ramsay MacDonald, British Prime Minis- ter, as she arrived at New York with her father for his confer- ence with President Roosevelt. SOLEMN BEAUTY.—Archbishop Kelly on Monday presided at the golden jubilee of the Rev. Mother Marie du Saint Esprit in the Carmelite Monastery, Dulwich Hill. The Rev. Mother is shown behind a grille specially decorated for the solemn occasion. She is the last of the French mothers who came from France 48 years ago. MRS. S. HARDY (left) looked sportsman-like in her pepper- and-salt tailor-made suit; at the side of her head she wore a small hat. She was accompanied by Mrs. Roy Chisholm, who blended a brown topcoat with a knitted sweater to match. Her hat and bag were en suite. HOW COSY is a mink fur coat on a wint...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

I STRONGLY RECOMMEND GAS FIRES Says a leading   Medical Expert   Harley Street district (London), the practising centre for many of the world's foremost medical authorities, has more gas fires to the acre than any other residential area in Great Britain.Three out of every four doctors in England use gas fires.Ninety per cent, of hospitals and nursing homes, etc., in London use gas fires. Sydney Hospital uses gas fires. What finer testimony could there be to the health and hygiene of these up-to-date room warmers! Modern gas fires are more hygienic than other room heaters because they provide a perfect system of ventilation and they are more healthful and health giving than other room heaters because they give off sunlike radiant heat—heat which warms your body and not merely the air in the room. Special Offer 20/- for fixing   If house pipes are suitable. Free fitting If gas is suitably laid on to fireplace. One deposit only for fire and fixing...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

How will your face face the WINTER Good-bye summer! Enter wintry winds and icy air! How will you protect your skin s0 that it does not tighten to cracking point; so that it does not chap; so that tiny red veins do not appear? Wintry weather can be very cruel to sensitive skins, but I have developed a simple, inexpensive method for keeping the face pliable, soft, smooth and all the more irresistible in that so many other faces will be showing the ravages of the harsher weather. Loveliness means so much! PERSONAL HOME METHOD OF lovely. To complete the facial treatment, WINTER CARE:- use Golden Youth or Rare Tulip face pow Each night wash with Paris Soap and warm der, selecting one of the lighter shades, water, dry quickly; apply a little Facial like rachel. These (wo powders are winter Youth Cleansing Cream; wipe off and apply weather-proof and are extremely protective, my Night Cream. Massage this into the skin as well as glamorously flattering. For a for a minute or so and leave the...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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