ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Waynesburg Messenger Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
12,833 results
.. -_ ^ * » ». . . . Escape of Prisoners from Richmond. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

. . -_ ^ * » ». . . . Escape of Prisoners from Richmond. Capt. DeGoIyer, of company F. Fourth Michigan regiment, and Assistant Quartermaster Henry C. Jenckes, of the Second Rhode Island regiment, escaped from the military prison in Richmond, on Tuesday, the 13th instant. From the escaped officers we give many interesting particulars of their fellow prisoners in this room. They say the Hon. Mr. Ely bears his confinement with equanimity, and that Col. Curcoran is well, and . was not wounded at all in the engagement. 'Japt. John Downey, of the Fire Zouaves, (reported killed,) is there uninjured and in good health.— Col. Wilcox is slightly wounded, but doing well. Mr. Alvin Huson, of Rochester, New York, is in good health. The Confederate papers claim that they have, as prisoners, two members of Congress. They probably count on Mr. Huson as one. The prisoners are ted on fresh beet, (generally boiled,) and wheat bread, with an allowance of bread every other day. Every fine afternoo...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
More Secession Women Arrested. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

More Secession Women Arrested. Mrs. Greenhow, a widow lady well known in Washington, was arrested by the provost guard of Brigadier General Portor on Sunday. Her secession proclivities have long been the subject of popular conversation. Mr.- Greenhow died" in California in 1844 or '45. He was twenty years agoemp loyed as librarian and translator in the State Dedariment here. Afterwards he was translator for the commission of private land claims in Calitomia, where he was accidentally killed. Also Mrs. Philips, wife of a former member of Congress from Alabama. Both are fashionable women, of a bold type of character, with rebel affinities, and are accused of carrying on treasonable correspondence, telling the enemy about our forces, fortifications, showing our weak points, and exaggerating everything in their favor, and enjoying intimate personal and epistolary relations with them—One of these women, whojare under guard at their homes, with the family who refuse to leave them,...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
How The Springfield Girls Welcomed their Volunteers Home. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

How The Springfield Girls Welcomed their Volunteers Home. In noticing the return of the Springfield companies from the First and Second Ohio, the Springfield News says : The inciaents of this occasion were v. aned and rich. Will Sykes came into the supper room in advance of his comrades. A little woman we took to be his mother charged upon him at once, capturing him without difficulty, and bore him off, dancing with delight at the conquest. We watched "Will's" contact with his young lady friends with some interest* At first they shook his hands, but one lair young charmer, had spunk enough to smack him outright, and then the others pitched in and did likewise. "Will" stood it like a soldier. After the girls got in the way of kissing, it was an easy matter for them to put the rest of the boys through, The greeting! were peculiar and impressive. Bill Thomas was greeted with —''God ' bless you all over. Others—f'God bless every hair of your head," &c, &c. Captain ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Another Arrest In Philadelphia. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Another Arrest In Philadelphia. On Saturday afternoon another zrrest was made in Philadelphia by the United States Marshall. The prisoner is one Samuel Eaken, an agent of the rebels.— The "Inquirer" says:—"Mr. Eakin is known to be a very ingenious man, and an extensive pattentee; but we are not at liberty to say for what he fias been arrested. Eaken acknowledged that he lived on Palmer Street, between Richmond and Queen, and his house being searched, a large quanlity of papers, about $1,000 in money found, ;i coil of telegraph wire for field purposes in blowing up fort, field batteries, &c.; a pass over the East Tennnessee and Georgia Railroad, and charging the passage of himself and freight to the Government of the Confederate States. Eaken is apparently about forty years of age, has a dark complexion, black hair and black whiskers, and was very well dressed. Eaken came to this city on Saturday week. He is an accomplished gentleman—a chemist and a telegrapher. [From...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Kentuck Tennessee Threatening Kentucky. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Kentuck Tennessee Threatening Kentucky. A letter from Georgetown, y, dated August 19th, says: "To-day, being our regular county court day, was selected by Col. Roger W. Hanson as an appropriate occasion for making a very inflammatory and traitorous speech. His object was to stir up a hellish spirit ot war. He began with an attack upon the . camp in Garrard county. He declared that, if those troops are not disbanded in thirty days, they will be put down at the point , of the bayonet. He said he saw Governor Harris, of Tennessee, a few days ago, and that Harris declared that he should consider it a violation of Kentucky's neutrality, and that Kentucky would have to meet 50,000 Tennessee troops in battle array it those camps are not speedily vacated.— Thiny days are given you, Union men ot Kentucky; use those thirty days to a good advantage, or a civil war will confront us with all its horrors."

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Belligerent Mail Bag. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

A Belligerent Mail Bag. In cleaning out "The Farmer and Advertiser" office in Bridgeport, Conn., a United States mail bag was found filled with papers addressed to leading Secessionists in Alabama, Georgia and other Southern States, also some two hundred wooden billies, turned and furnished with strings for the wrists. These clubs were made from shovel handles, and were probably furnished by a secession shovel manufacturer in Bridgeport. Some curious letters were also discovered, exposing the treason of politicians in Hartford and elsewhere. One of the editors of The Farmer has gone to New Haven, threatening to issue his paper from the Register office tomorrow..

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Starvation In Blemnhls. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Starvation In Blemnhls. Hunger begins to pinch the rebels in Tennessee. The Memphis "Avalanche" says that the destitution of the poor in that city- is daily on the increase. The sum donated to the wives and children of volunteers by the county court is no longer paid, the a.nount, having been so much larger than was anticipated, emptied the treasury. The result is that those soldiers who enlisted, relying upon receiving the amount appropriated, now see their wives and children in an actual starving condition.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Gone Over to the "Rebels. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Gone Over to the "Rebels. First Lieutenant Manning M. Kunmell, of the Second Cavalry, who was at Bull Run with a part of his regiment, has resigned his commission and accepted a Captaincy in the rebel cavalry in Missouri. He had the new commission before the battle. Two otherofficers in the same regiment are suspected, and it is believed that they also have commissions from the rebels , which they are debating whether to accept ur not. Off with them.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Wutt9t0,ooo,ooo. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Wutt9t0,ooo,ooo. It is stated on reliable authority that an offer was lately made to Secretary Chase, on behalf of foreign bankers, to take $50,-000,000 of the loan, provided the Government would promise to pay the interest at Fraokfort-on-the-Main. The Secretary, however, declined ihe offer, as he is confident in tbe ability of the Government to maintain itself without asking the aid ef foreign capital. "

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Arrival of Mutineers—The Flag of Truce Dodge <&c. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Arrival of Mutineers—The Flag of Truce Dodge <&c. FORTRESS MONROE, August 26.—The steamer Philadelphia has arrived from Washington with one hundred and fiftvnine mutineers, sentenced to two veal ' s' imprisonment at the Tortugas. They have been sent temporarily to the Rip Raps.— A flag ot truce arrived from Norfolk this morning with three ladies and a number of prisioners captured by the rebel privateers. As the object of sending the lUg of trice at this time was deamed rather inquisitive, Gen. Wool decided to detain the flag until late to-morrow. It is high time that an end should be put to this constant intrusion of tbe enemy. Whenever they think any important movement is on foot here they are sure to be on hand with a flag of truce. Capt. Davis, the Provost Marshal, yesterday arrested the orew of the schooner Chingarara, from New York. Gen. Wool sent tbW*) the Rip Raps Seven spies have been eihtested and placed in confinement.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Adams' Express Company Refuse to Carry Letters to the Rebels. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Adams' Express Company Refuse to Carry Letters to the Rebels. WASHINGTON , August 20 The Adams' Express Company having applied to the proper authorities for the construction to be placed on the President's Proclamaiion relating to the interdiction of commercial intercourse with the so called Confederate Siates, and learning that it was intended include letters, immediately issued orders to all their officers to cease receiving letters without waiting for the expiration of the limit ot time numbered in that document. It is not known what action, if any, has been taken by the letter express companies on thissubject.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Mayor Berret a Prisoner—Court House Fired by an Incendiary. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Mayor Berret a Prisoner—Court House Fired by an Incendiary. BALTIMORE, August 24.— Mayor Berrit, of Washington, passed through as a prisoner this morning, destined for Fort Lay* fayetle, in; New York harbor. The Baltimore county Court House, at Towsontown, was fired this morning by an incendiary. The record office was destroyed, but the rest of the building escaped.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Arrest of an Officer iu the Rebel Army. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Arrest of an Officer iu the Rebel Army. PMLAOEI.PHIA, August 26.—The police last night arrested Wm. Johnson,a nephew of Gen. Johnson, of the rebel army, and an officer in the same army. The prisoner has been in the city about two weeks, stopping with a relative, and was arrested at the Pennsylvania Railroad depot, after he had purchased tickets for Louisville, Ky. He was brought with his baggage to the Central Station, where he was searched.— No commission was found on him, but in his trunk a number of letters were found, directed to parlies in the Seceded States. Some of the letters mentioned the prisoner as an officer in the rebel army. He was sent to prison, and will have a hearing to day.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Rebel Pickets—Union Men elated—CivU War hi Kentucky $c. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

The Rebel Pickets—Union Men elated—CivU War hi Kentucky $c. WASHINGTON, August 27.—The rebel pickets are reported to be nearer our fortifications across the liver than ever before. It is not believed that the rebels have now any design to attack. The Union men here are very much elated by the election of Waliach as Mayor, in place of Berritt. Mr. Waliach is a warm fiersonal friend of the President, and anold ine Whig. Amos -Kandall is removing hisJurniture from his country seat, near Washington, purposing to reside in Trenton, N. J. till the war closes. He is writing his life, and needs quiet. Private advices from Kentucky represent that State on the very verge of civil war. The Union men are ready. Capt. Keys was arrested at Chain Bridge this morning. He belongs to the District Troops There was an alarm at Chain Bridge last night, and the troops turned out in force. It proved false. Secretary of State, Seward left this morning tor New York. W.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Improved Condition of the Army. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Improved Condition of the Army. WASHINGTON, August '£5—Ihe continued improvement of the troop3, in all respects, is the subject of congratulation in the army, as well as the Executive quarters. This result is mainly from strict discipline. The line ot the upper Potomac is now well guarded, and at the latest reliable accounts Gen. Banks was still resting on the Monocacy, The administration of the oath of allegiance, as prescribed by the Act of Congress, was a matter of interest to the clerks in the Bureau of the Auditor of the Treasury for the Post Office Department this morning.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Ftgbt at Charleston, Bio.— The Fiercest Encounter of the . War. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

The Ftgbt at Charleston, Bio.— The Fiercest Encounter of the . War. We find by mail that iho wonderful sucicess of a small federal force against enor- i JJJOUS odds, at Charleston, Mo., is not a .whit exaggerated. To have, fought so long, and against Much numbers, to have Sailed over fifty, and to have Captured men •Vith so kttlirldss on our side, is one of the strange events of this strange war. It be--«ame known at Bird's Point t>« Sunday that the rebels were in pretty strong1 force at Charleston, thirteen miles out on the) Cairo and Fulton railway, and Monday.j 'morning Colonel Dougherty ot the 82d, • was ordered to detail two hiuidr«d and titty men from bis commaml a&Tg" and root •ihem. Oipt. Nolem*a, with fifty men of the Centralis cavalry, was also ordered to proceed by road to a p lac some three miles this aide of Charleston, and join force with Col; Dougherty. Detachments from cmpanies A, B, C, D, E and G, ot the Twenty-Second Illinois, were detailled fo...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
BlorrsHsIc Tragealy ozVEtoard tHo 2Jos?Rsa SJSTII 5,'zariiia—A BJ>es-»e!rs»i<! Mate. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

BlorrsHsIc Tragealy ozVEtoard tHo 2Jos?Rsa SJSTII 5,'zariiia—A BJ>es-»e!rs»i<! Mate. The Boston "Traveler" g ives the parlir-idRi-s of the trage.ly pp. board the Huston bark Czaiina, reported in our dispatches :—One o! ihe crew of the O.atina, named Jehu .Shaw, an Indian, of Oldtown, known among his tribe ws "Pushaw,'' mak'.-s the i.i'.owinp; statement: Or. the lath 1,1". ;•;! >• the Captain and Alate had a ;t)tv in tin- e;i * ,;ii ; the Captain culled or; 1.11 i'.andb lo cuiiie and put the Mate in iron:; ; tiie Alaio was then armed with a large revolver; the Captain Uoked him why he was-drmed; the Mate said. ' "Co away from nie, 1 am a desperate mnn ;" vvu . stued back, end the Caplahi and Mate made tip, when we went forward. On the HOth of.Inly I went to the wheel at four m the morning ; saw soon oft.-T the »ec.-n;i! male drank ; saw the.mate, with bottlo arid cup, ho got the second mate (trunk, so tint he was speechless ; afterwards lie was quiet; soon ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Squabble Among Rebel Leaders—Who Shall be President—Danger of a Grand Flare Uji. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

A Squabble Among Rebel Leaders—Who Shall be President—Danger of a Grand Flare Uji. The Government has reliable information, says a dispatch to the Times, that a quarrel has broken out among the leading traitors of the rebel States, that promises to be as disastrous to Mom as H'as the Bull Run affair lo us. The belligerents are Toombs and the Virginians and North Carolinians on tho one side, and Davis, VVi gfall and the extremist of South Carolina on the other. The complaint among the disaffected is, that Davis is making rather fast to the legitimate results of treason, the abnegation of State and individual rights. The government ot Georgia, you recolect, protested , against some acts of President Davis, and it is here understood that in doing 30 ho acted in concert with the malcontents at Richmond. The quarrel between these parties has alread y reached the extent that the disaffected do not hesitate to openly denounce Davis in the streets and public places of Richmond. The ne...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Commttwartums. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Commttwartums. MILO WETZEL co. VA., \ Aug. 23d 18U1 ) Messrs. Jones ^r Jennings *—The Wheel* in"- Convention nas ut length, so far as their power goes, inado a new .State. They comp leted their labors on Wednesday last. The projects has yet however to pass severe ordeals before the stale of ••Kenhawa" is 11 lixed fact, lt has 10 receive 11 lavorable vote of the people within its bounds ; have a Constitution formed and favorably passed on by the people; be accepted by the next Legislature ol tho State and then be recognized by Congress also. There is no doubt, 1 think, that a large majority of the pojde within the proposed bounds are in favor of a new State—yet there was consic!(*ablo opposition to its passage—many good friends of the measures thinking matters were sufficiently complicated at present —while others passed it on the grounds of having all our troubles over as soon as possible by taking them altogether. Some members, ah'O, wished to include more Counties and have a...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
MARTINSVILLE, Aug, 19th, "1881. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

MARTINSVILLE, Aug, 19th, "1881. For the Messenger. Messrs. Jonest gr Jennings—(JESTLKAIE.N: I —For the first time in my life, I ask for a j space in your paper to contradict a report ; circulated throughoutthis county, and part ! of Washington county, my former place j of residence, by some unprincipled AboU 1 itionists, whom I shall not name, that I jam a Secostn.-nisi, and'thit I am makingi up a .M'cess-.rt ':om|>.,nv; iv.i. furiher ¦ that i have a Seeds';-n flag ' unfurled, and ! that all the DairrcrnH in ihij vicinity me ' disloyal to the t.' nion. TV Ihe author Mj i this report 1 hav? to say t'nat he isablaOkfe ' hearted. Abolition falsi'.:- who, with hm political associates, is trying to break up the Union and stir up strife among neighbors by calling good, loyal citizens traitors , for expressing their own sentiments. 1 have never meddled much in politics, but always voted the Democratic ticket; and when beaten, was always ready to submit and stand up to th...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
x
Loading...
x
x